Special Issue "Carbon-Related Nanomaterials in Analytical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Maria Laura Soriano
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
Interests: graphene quantum dots; carbon dots; photoluminescence; sensors; sorbents; analytical nanoscience and nanotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of the Journal C is devoted to the Analytical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (AN&N), in which the impact of carbon-related nanomaterials in analytical science as an interdisciplinary interface is outlined.

The main interest of this Special Issue is to offer to specialists and non-specialised readers a panoramic view of the hot topics and the state-of-the-art of AN&N based on carbon-related nanomaterials and composites. First, reliability of the chemical information of carbon nanomaterials must be assured. Thus, the formation/growth processes as well as the structural characterization of nanosystems is of crucial consideration. Secondly, diverse roles of nano-sized carbon materials in analytical science can be explored, being considered i) as the target analyte (the analysis of the nanoworld), ii)  as the analytical tool (acting as sorbent, sensors, etc.) and iii) as both analyte and nanotool in the same analytical process (third way in AN&N). In this framework, novelties like the synthesis of nano- and micromotors as sensors or gel-like systems with specific nanopores as sorbent materials can be highlighted.

The main developments to date and the trends in AN&N are impacting in other fields of research like bioanalysis and bioimaging (implying qualitative/quantitative measurements). This is an interdisciplinary subject capable of solving environmental problems and controlling the reliability of nanotechnological processes and also the consuming products ‘content from unwanted substances. It is important not to forget the nanotoxicological aspects of carbon-related nanomaterials, their release to the environment and the consequently cascading effects in the ecosystem whether natural or human-induced. Thus, the exposure limits of nanomaterials are a pending subject which needs to be solved for developing new regulations about maximum tolerance levels.

Dr. Maria Laura Soriano
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. C is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Carbon-based nanodots
  • Graphene derivatives
  • Nanotubes
  • Diamond-like carbon
  • Fullerenes
  • Optical properties
  • Electrochemical properties
  • Structural characterization
  • Reliability
  • Sensing
  • Sorbents
  • Nanotoxicity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Removal of Lead by Oxidized Graphite
C 2021, 7(1), 23; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c7010023 - 20 Feb 2021
Viewed by 375
Abstract
Lead ion adsorption on the surfaces of pristine and oxidized graphite is studied quantitatively using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and standard electrochemical measurements. The XPS analysis confirmed the oxidation of graphite, yielding a final composite consisting of 15.97% of oxygen and 84.03% of [...] Read more.
Lead ion adsorption on the surfaces of pristine and oxidized graphite is studied quantitatively using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and standard electrochemical measurements. The XPS analysis confirmed the oxidation of graphite, yielding a final composite consisting of 15.97% of oxygen and 84.03% of carbon in comparison with the pristine graphite powder consisting of 6.13% oxygen and 93.87% carbon. The adsorption of lead (II) ion was confirmed by the peaks observed at 138 eV and 143.8 eV, associated with the emissions from Pb4f 7/2 and Pb4f 5/2, respectively. The effective concentration of Pb2+ ion and the optimum dosage of oxidized graphite were calculated to be 400 µM and 200 mg, respectively. Adsorption capacity of bare graphite was 41.18%, whereas that of oxidized graphite was 73.3%. The present results show that graphite oxide is a candidate material for the adsorption of Pb2+ ion from water. Full article
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