Special Issue "Electrocatalysis/Photocatalysis for CO2 Conversion, H2 Production, and Pollutant Removal"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrocatalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ki Tae Park
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Climate Change Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER), 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34129, Korea
Interests: electrocatalysis; electrocatalysts; fuel cell; CO2 conversion; carbon capture utilization (CCU)
Prof. Dr. Chang-Tang Chang
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Department of Environmental Engineering, National I-lan University, Yilan City, Taiwan
Interests: application and development of catalyst and photo-catalyst; Air quality and water quality assessment; Control and measurement of nanoparticle and surface studies
Dr. Wonhee Lee
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Climate Change Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER), 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34129, Korea
Interests: electrochemical CO2 conversion; novel electrochemical systems for CO2 conversion; electrochemical CO2 conversion mechanism; heterogeneous electrocatalysis; chlor-alkali process; oxygen reduction reaction (ORR); CO2 mineralization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electrocatalysis/photocatalysis are the acceleration of electroreactions/photoreactions by heterogeneous electrocatalysts/photocatalysts to produce valuable chemicals or to decompose harmful materials. These methods can provide various approaches to alleviate serious environmental problems. Above all, electrocatalysis/photocatalysis have been considered as promising strategies for CO2-derived chemical and H2 production, which could reduce the greenhouse gas emission and produce the alternative green fuel. Global warming induced by the release of CO2 and other greenhouse gases has led to climate change, melting of icebergs, and sea-level rise, which threatens human life and disturbs the ecosystem. CO2 is the inevitable product as a result of fossil fuel consumption and occupies more than 70% of the total amount of greenhouse gases. To alleviate the environmental problem, efficient catalytic processes for CO2 conversion or alternative green fuel production have to be studied and developed. Utilization of electricity or solar energy as sources for catalysis provides encouraging approaches to produce fuels and chemicals from carbon-based sources as well as H2. The electrocatalytic/photocatalytic conversion of CO2 can be the more environmentally friendly approach for production of the CO2-derived chemicals, such as formic acid, carbon monoxide, syngas, ethylene, various alcohols, and organic acids. In addition, H2 production by water splitting is one of the prominent methodologies which has been carried out for past few decades. Not only the production of the chemicals and fuels, but also the decomposition of harmful organic pollutants can be achieved by electrocatalysis/photocatalysis. These are the promising technologies which improve the indoor air quality or degrade water pollutants.

This Special Issue will provide information about novel advanced electrocatalysts/photocatalysts for efficient CO2 conversion, H2 production, and pollutant removal. Thus, we welcome the papers focusing on the diverse synthesis methods and novel designs of crystal structures for the electrocatalysts/photocatalysts to improve their electrochemical/photochemical performance with high stability, as well as theoretical reaction mechanisms at the molecular level occurring on the well-designed catalytic surfaces. We encourage the submission of all types of papers including communications, research and review papers, covering all the topics of innovative electrocatalysts/photocatalysts and their environmental applications.

Dr. Ki Tae Park
Prof. Dr. Chang-Tang Chang
Dr. Wonhee Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

Electrocatalysis

Photocatalysis

Photoelectrocatalysis

Electrocatalyst

Photocatalyst

Carbon dioxide conversion

Carbon capture and utilization (CCU)

Hydrogen production

Pollutant Removal

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Constructing g-C3N4/Cd1−xZnxS-Based Heterostructures for Efficient Hydrogen Production under Visible Light
Catalysts 2021, 11(11), 1340; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/catal11111340 - 06 Nov 2021
Viewed by 411
Abstract
Two types of photocatalysts, 1%Pt/Cd1−xZnxS/g-C3N4 (x = 0.2–0.3) and Cd1−xZnxS/1%Pt/g-C3N4 (x = 0.2–0.3), were synthesized by varying the deposition order of platinum, and a solid solution of cadmium and [...] Read more.
Two types of photocatalysts, 1%Pt/Cd1−xZnxS/g-C3N4 (x = 0.2–0.3) and Cd1−xZnxS/1%Pt/g-C3N4 (x = 0.2–0.3), were synthesized by varying the deposition order of platinum, and a solid solution of cadmium and zinc sulfides onto the surface of g-C3N4. The characterization of photocatalysts showed that, for 1%Pt/Cd1−xZnxS/g-C3N4, small platinum particles were deposited onto a solid solution of cadmium and zinc sulfides; in the case of Cd1−xZnxS/1%Pt/g-C3N4, enlarged platinum clusters were located on the surface of graphitic carbon nitride. Based on the structure of the photocatalysts, we assumed that, in the first case, type II heterojunctions and, in the latter case, S-scheme heterojunctions were realized. The activity of the synthesized samples was tested in hydrogen evolution from triethanolamine (TEOA) basic solution under visible light (λ = 450 nm). A remarkable increase in hydrogen evolution rate compared to single-phase platinized 1%Pt/Cd1−xZnxS photocatalysts was observed only in the case of ternary photocatalysts with platinum located on the g-C3N4 surface, Cd1−xZnxS/1%Pt/g-C3N4. Thus, we proved using kinetic experiments and characterization techniques that, for composite photocatalysts based on Cd1−xZnxS and g-C3N4, the formation of the S-scheme mechanism is more favorable than that for type II heterojunction. The highest activity, 2.5 mmol H2 g−1 h−1, with an apparent quantum efficiency equal to 6.0% at a wavelength of 450 nm was achieved by sample 20% Cd0.8Zn0.2S/1% Pt/g-C3N4. Full article
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Article
Facile Synthesis of Tin Dioxide Nanoparticles for Photocatalytic Degradation of Congo Red Dye in Aqueous Solution
Catalysts 2020, 10(7), 792; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/catal10070792 - 16 Jul 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 930
Abstract
This research work reports an approach used to prepare a SnO2 photocatalyst by precipitation and calcination pathways and describes an investigation of the effects of preparation parameters on SnO2 yield. The SnO2 photocatalyst was further used for the photocatalytic degradation [...] Read more.
This research work reports an approach used to prepare a SnO2 photocatalyst by precipitation and calcination pathways and describes an investigation of the effects of preparation parameters on SnO2 yield. The SnO2 photocatalyst was further used for the photocatalytic degradation of Congo red (CR) dye, and the removal efficiency was optimized using response surface methodology. The results indicate that the SnO2 photocatalyst yield was the highest in 0.05 M of the precursor, stannous chloride and 28 wt % ammonia as the precipitant, pH 10, at 30 °C. The transmission electron microscopy results of the SnO2 photocatalyst illustrate that the average particle size was mainly around 30–50 nm and had a solid spherical shape. The X-ray diffraction results reveal that the prepared sample had a highly crystalline SnO2 rutile crystal structure. The prediction and experimental results of the Response surface methodology (RSM) indicate that, when the reaction time was 97 min, the operating temperature was 47 °C, the photocatalyst dosage was 751 mg/L, and the optimal degradation rate of the CR dye was 100%. After five consecutive photodegradation reactions, the degradation rate remained at 100%. The results demonstrated that the SnO2 photocatalyst prepared in this study possesses excellent reusability. Full article
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Article
Photocatalytic Performance of NiO/NiTiO3 Composite Nanofiber Films
Catalysts 2019, 9(6), 561; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/catal9060561 - 24 Jun 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1557
Abstract
Photocatalytic degradation of pollutants is one of the cleanest technologies for environmental remediation. Herein, we prepared NiO/NiTiO3 heterostructure nanofiber (200 nm) films by electrospinning and high temperature heat treatment, using nickel acetate and tetrabutyltitanate as nickel and titanium sources, respectively. The NiO/NiTiO [...] Read more.
Photocatalytic degradation of pollutants is one of the cleanest technologies for environmental remediation. Herein, we prepared NiO/NiTiO3 heterostructure nanofiber (200 nm) films by electrospinning and high temperature heat treatment, using nickel acetate and tetrabutyltitanate as nickel and titanium sources, respectively. The NiO/NiTiO3 heterostructure has advantages of good photodegradation rate constant and stability. By controlling the temperature, we can optimize the phase composition of these nanofibers for better photocatalytic performance. Based on our findings of the Rhodamine B degradation results, the best performance was obtained with 10% NiO and 90% NiTiO3; 92.9% of the Rhodamine B (5 mg/L) was degraded after reaction under full spectrum irradiation for 60 min. More importantly, the repeating test showed that these nanofiber films can remain active and stable after multiple cycles. The mechanisms of the photocatalysis reactions were also discussed. This demonstration provides a guideline in designing a new photocatalyst that we hope will serve the environmental needs for this and the coming century. Full article
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Review

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Review
From CO2 to Value-Added Products: A Review about Carbon-Based Materials for Electro-Chemical CO2 Conversion
Catalysts 2021, 11(3), 351; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/catal11030351 - 09 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1446
Abstract
The global warming and the dangerous climate change arising from the massive emission of CO2 from the burning of fossil fuels have motivated the search for alternative clean and sustainable energy sources. However, the industrial development and population necessities make the decoupling [...] Read more.
The global warming and the dangerous climate change arising from the massive emission of CO2 from the burning of fossil fuels have motivated the search for alternative clean and sustainable energy sources. However, the industrial development and population necessities make the decoupling of economic growth from fossil fuels unimaginable and, consequently, the capture and conversion of CO2 to fuels seems to be, nowadays, one of the most promising and attractive solutions in a world with high energy demand. In this respect, the electrochemical CO2 conversion using renewable electricity provides a promising solution. However, faradaic efficiency of common electro-catalysts is low, and therefore, the design of highly selective, energy-efficient, and cost-effective electrocatalysts is critical. Carbon-based materials present some advantages such as relatively low cost and renewability, excellent electrical conductivity, and tunable textural and chemical surface, which show them as competitive materials for the electro-reduction of CO2. In this review, an overview of the recent progress of carbon-based electro-catalysts in the conversion of CO2 to valuable products is presented, focusing on the role of the different carbon properties, which provides a useful understanding for the materials design progress in this field. Development opportunities and challenges in the field are also summarized. Full article
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Review
Hierarchical Ternary Sulfides as Effective Photocatalyst for Hydrogen Generation Through Water Splitting: A Review on the Performance of ZnIn2S4
Catalysts 2021, 11(2), 277; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/catal11020277 - 19 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1381
Abstract
One of the major aspects and advantages of solar energy conversion is the photocatalytic hydrogen generation using semiconductor materials for an eco-friendly technology. Designing a low-cost efficient material to overcome limited light absorption as well as rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers is [...] Read more.
One of the major aspects and advantages of solar energy conversion is the photocatalytic hydrogen generation using semiconductor materials for an eco-friendly technology. Designing a low-cost efficient material to overcome limited light absorption as well as rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers is essential to achieve considerable hydrogen generation. In recent years, sulfide based semiconductors have attracted scientific research interest due to their excellent solar response and narrow band gap. The present review focuses on the recent approaches in the development of hierarchical ternary sulfide based photocatalysts with a special focus on ZnIn2S4. We also observe how the electronic structure of ZnIn2S4 is beneficial for water splitting and the various strategies involved for improving the material efficiency for photocatalytic hydrogen generation. The review places emphasis on the latest advancement/new insights on ZnIn2S4 being used as an efficient material for hydrogen generation through photocatalytic water splitting. Recent progress on essential aspects which govern light absorption, charge separation and transport are also discussed in detail. Full article
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Review
Mimicking the Catalytic Center for the Water-Splitting Reaction in Photosystem II
Catalysts 2020, 10(2), 185; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/catal10020185 - 03 Feb 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1383
Abstract
The oxygen-evolving center (OEC) in photosystem II (PSII) of plants, algae and cyanobacteria is a unique natural catalyst that splits water into electrons, protons and dioxygen. The crystallographic studies of PSII have revealed that the OEC is an asymmetric Mn4CaO5 [...] Read more.
The oxygen-evolving center (OEC) in photosystem II (PSII) of plants, algae and cyanobacteria is a unique natural catalyst that splits water into electrons, protons and dioxygen. The crystallographic studies of PSII have revealed that the OEC is an asymmetric Mn4CaO5-cluster. The understanding of the structure-function relationship of this natural Mn4CaO5-cluster is impeded mainly due to the complexity of the protein environment and lack of a rational chemical model as a reference. Although it has been a great challenge for chemists to synthesize the OEC in the laboratory, significant advances have been achieved recently. Different artificial complexes have been reported, especially a series of artificial Mn4CaO4-clusters that closely mimic both the geometric and electronic structures of the OEC in PSII, which provides a structurally well-defined chemical model to investigate the structure-function relationship of the natural Mn4CaO5-cluster. The deep investigations on this artificial Mn4CaO4-cluster could provide new insights into the mechanism of the water-splitting reaction in natural photosynthesis and may help the development of efficient catalysts for the water-splitting reaction in artificial photosynthesis. Full article
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