Special Issue "Cellular Processes of Energy Transduction in Physiological and Pathological Conditions"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Cellular Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Maria Pina Mollica
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, 80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: mitochondria; energy metabolism; obesity and insulin resistance; oxidative stress; inflammation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Marianna Crispino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: cellular and molecular mechanism of synaptic plasticity; synaptic protein synthesis; serotonin receptors; neurodevelopment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In physiological conditions, cell energy homeostasis is tightly controlled by the contribution of different metabolic tissues. Among them, a crucial role is played by peripheral tissues with a high metabolic rate such as liver, skeletal muscle, and heart, but also by the central nervous system that has high energy demands to perform its numerous functions. Energy homeostasis is maintained in response to energy challenges such as diet, exercise or body weight changes. The decline in cellular energy processes is observed in physiological aging and in noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes, obesity, heart failure, and neurodegenerative diseases characterized by low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of altered energy transduction in physiological and pathological conditions may give an essential contribution in diagnosis and therapy of different pathologies. From this point of view, a crucial role is played by mitochondria that provide ATP for the cells but are also involved in several metabolic pathways, apoptosis, and programmed cell death, as well as in the synthesis of key molecules related to inflammation and oxidative stress. Therefore, it is no surprise that mitochondrial dysfunctions are part of the wide spectrum of metabolic changes induced by low-grade inflammation and other energy-dependent disturbances. It is important to underline that mitochondria are dynamic organelles that support metabolic adaptations to several cell energy demands. These mitochondrial responses might be either protective or become progressively detrimental. This Special Issue of Cells is dedicated to illustrating all the cellular and molecular events controlling energy homeostasis in different tissues and organs in response to energy challenges such as diet, exercise, body weight changes and aging process, but also underlying the decline in energy processes associated to non-communicable diseases. This Special Issue welcomes studies that approach some of these aspects in the attempt to deepen the knowledge related to the cellular energy processes in physiological and pathological conditions.

We are looking forward to your contributions to this Special Issue.

Prof. Maria Pina Mollica
Prof. Marianna Crispino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy homeostasis
  • energy transduction
  • mitochondria
  • neurogenerative diseases
  • aging
  • non-communicable diseases
  • inflammation
  • oxidative stress

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
The Liver under the Spotlight: Bile Acids and Oxysterols as Pivotal Actors Controlling Metabolism
Cells 2021, 10(2), 400; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cells10020400 - 16 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1779
Abstract
Among the myriad of molecules produced by the liver, both bile acids and their precursors, the oxysterols are becoming pivotal bioactive lipids which have been underestimated for a long time. Their actions are ranging from regulation of energy homeostasis (i.e., glucose and lipid [...] Read more.
Among the myriad of molecules produced by the liver, both bile acids and their precursors, the oxysterols are becoming pivotal bioactive lipids which have been underestimated for a long time. Their actions are ranging from regulation of energy homeostasis (i.e., glucose and lipid metabolism) to inflammation and immunity, thereby opening the avenue to new treatments to tackle metabolic disorders associated with obesity (e.g., type 2 diabetes and hepatic steatosis) and inflammatory diseases. Here, we review the biosynthesis of these endocrine factors including their interconnection with the gut microbiota and their impact on host homeostasis as well as their attractive potential for the development of therapeutic strategies for metabolic disorders. Full article
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