Special Issue "Feature Papers on Luminescent Sensing"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Analytical Methods, Instrumentation and Miniaturization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 2943

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jin-Ming Lin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Beijing Key Laboratory of Microanalytical Methods and Instrumentation, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Interests: bio- and environmental analytical chemistry; microfluidics and mass spectrometry for cell analysis; chemiluminescence/fluorescence immunoassay for protein and DNA analysis; analytical methods for negative oxygen ions and reactive oxygen species (ROS); sample pretreatment for mass spectrometry and chromatography analysis; development of analytical instrumentation
Prof. Dr. Qiongzheng Hu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Qilu University of Technology (Shandong Academy of Sciences), Jinan 250014, China
Interests: liquid crystals; sensors; polymer dots; fluorescent materials; paper-based devices
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Luminescent sensors act as critical detection tools in a broad range of areas in biology, medicine, environmental care, etc. This Special Issue will provide a forum for the latest research activities in the field of luminescent sensors such as bioluminescent sensors, chemiluminescent sensors, electrochemiluminescent sensors, sonoluminescent sensors, triboluminescent sensors, and fluorescent and phosphorescent sensors. Both review articles and original research papers are encouraged in, though not limited to, the following areas:

  • The new concepts of developing luminescent sensors;
  • The design of new luminescent materials for sensing applications;
  • The use of new materials for the development of luminescent sensors;
  • The emerging applications of luminescent sensors;
  • State-of-the-art technologies to improve the performance of luminescent sensors;
  • The fabrication of custom-made luminescent sensors;
  • The development of luminescence-based instruments for sensing applications;

If you want to learn more information or need any advice, you can contact the Special Issue Editor Tammy Zhang via <[email protected]> directly.

Prof. Dr. Jin-Ming Lin
Prof. Dr. Qiongzheng Hu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioluminescent sensors
  • chemiluminescent sensors
  • electrochemiluminescent sensors
  • sonoluminescent sensors
  • triboluminescent sensors
  • fluorescent sensors
  • phosphorescent sensors

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Signal-On and Highly Sensitive Electrochemiluminescence Biosensor for Hydrogen Sulfide in Joint Fluid Based on Silver-Ion-Mediated Base Pairs and Hybridization Chain Reaction
Chemosensors 2022, 10(7), 250; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/chemosensors10070250 - 28 Jun 2022
Viewed by 154
Abstract
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in joint fluid acts as a signal molecule to regulate joint inflammation. Direct detection of H2S in joint fluid is of great significance for the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis. However, due to the low volume [...] Read more.
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in joint fluid acts as a signal molecule to regulate joint inflammation. Direct detection of H2S in joint fluid is of great significance for the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis. However, due to the low volume of joint fluid and low H2S concentration, existing methods face the problem of the insufficient limit of detection. In this study, a highly sensitive biosensor was proposed by designing a primer probe and combining it with hybrid chain reaction (HCR) under the strong interaction between metal ions and H2S to achieve H2S detection. The primer probe containing multiple cytosine (C) sequences was fixed on a gold electrode, and the C–Ag–C hairpin structure was formed under the action of Ag+. In the presence of H2S, it can combine with Ag+ in the hairpin structure to form Ag2S, which leads to the opening of the hairpin structure and triggers the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) with another two hairpin structures (H1 and H2). A large number of double-stranded nucleic acid structures can be obtained on the electrode surface. Finally, Ru(phen)32+ can be embedded into the double chain structure to generate the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal. The linear response of the H2S biosensor ranged from 0.1000 to 1500 nM, and the limit of detection concentration of H2S was 0.0398 nM. The developed biosensor was successfully used to determine H2S in joint fluid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers on Luminescent Sensing)
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Article
Self-Assembled Inkjet Printer for Droplet Digital Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification
Chemosensors 2022, 10(7), 247; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/chemosensors10070247 - 28 Jun 2022
Viewed by 109
Abstract
Developing rapid and inexpensive diagnostic tools for molecular detection has been pushed forward by the advancements of technical aspects. However, attention has rarely been paid to the molecular detection methodology using inkjet printing technique. Herein, we developed an approach that employed a self-assembled [...] Read more.
Developing rapid and inexpensive diagnostic tools for molecular detection has been pushed forward by the advancements of technical aspects. However, attention has rarely been paid to the molecular detection methodology using inkjet printing technique. Herein, we developed an approach that employed a self-assembled inkjet printer as the enabling technology to realize droplet digital loop-mediated isothermal amplification in a low-cost and practical format. An inkjet printer is a self-assembled tool for the generation of discrete droplets in controllable volumes from a picoliter to a nanoliter. A microfluidic chip serves as a droplets reservoir to perform droplet digital LAMP assays. The inkjet printer approach successfully quantified the HPV16 from CaSki cells. This self-assembled and practical inkjet printer device may therefore become a promising tool for rapid molecular detection and can be extended to on-site analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers on Luminescent Sensing)
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Article
Photoluminescence Sensing of Chloride Ions in Sea Sand Using Alcohol-Dispersed CsPbBr3@SiO2 Perovskite Nanocrystal Composites
Chemosensors 2022, 10(5), 170; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/chemosensors10050170 - 02 May 2022
Viewed by 652
Abstract
In this study, CsPbBr3@SiO2 perovskite nanocrystal composites (CsPbBr3@SiO2 PNCCs) were synthesized by a benzyl bromide nucleophilic substitution strategy. Homogeneous halide exchange between CsPbBr3@SiO2 PNCCs and Cl solution (aqueous phase) was applied to the [...] Read more.
In this study, CsPbBr3@SiO2 perovskite nanocrystal composites (CsPbBr3@SiO2 PNCCs) were synthesized by a benzyl bromide nucleophilic substitution strategy. Homogeneous halide exchange between CsPbBr3@SiO2 PNCCs and Cl solution (aqueous phase) was applied to the determination of Cl in sea sand samples. Fast halide exchange with Cl in the aqueous phase without any magnetic stirring or pH regulation resulted in the blue shift of the photoluminescence (PL) wavelength and vivid PL color changes from green to blue. The results show that the PL sensing of Cl in aqueous samples could be implemented by using the halide exchange of CsPbBr3@SiO2 PNCCs. A linear relationship between the PL wavelength shift and the Cl concentration in the range of 0 to 3.0% was found, which was applied to the determination of Cl concentration in sea sand samples. This method greatly simplifies the detection process and provides a new idea for further broadening PL sensing using the CsPbBr3 PNC halide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers on Luminescent Sensing)
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Article
Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Photonic Hydrogel Films Immobilized with Urease Used for the Detection of Hg2+
Chemosensors 2022, 10(4), 140; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/chemosensors10040140 - 08 Apr 2022
Viewed by 693
Abstract
Mercury ion is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminants which can accumulate in the body through multiple channels, posing a detrimental impact on human health. We demonstrate a simple and low-cost method for the detection of Hg2+ assisted by a [...] Read more.
Mercury ion is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminants which can accumulate in the body through multiple channels, posing a detrimental impact on human health. We demonstrate a simple and low-cost method for the detection of Hg2+ assisted by a cholesteric liquid crystal photonic hydrogel (polyacrylic acid (PAA)) film with immobilized urease (CLC-PAAurease film). In the absence of Hg2+, a significant change in color and an obvious red shift in the reflected light wavelength of the prepared film were observed, since urease can hydrolyze urea to produce NH3, resulting in an increasing pH value of the microenvironment of CLC-PAAurease film. Hg2+ can inhibit the activity of urease so that the color change of the film is not obvious, corresponding to a relatively small variation of the reflected light wavelength. Therefore, Hg2+ can be quantitatively detected by measuring the displacement of the reflected light wavelength of the film. The detection limit of Hg2+ is about 10 nM. This approach has a good application prospect in the monitoring of heavy metal ions in environmental water resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers on Luminescent Sensing)
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Article
A Label-Free Colorimetric Assay Based on Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of H2O2 and Glucose
Chemosensors 2022, 10(3), 100; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/chemosensors10030100 - 05 Mar 2022
Viewed by 747
Abstract
The significance of sensing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is due to its ubiquity, being a potential biomarker as well as an end-product of several oxidation reactions. Herein, based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and coupled with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and ceria [...] Read more.
The significance of sensing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is due to its ubiquity, being a potential biomarker as well as an end-product of several oxidation reactions. Herein, based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and coupled with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and ceria nanoparticles (CeO2), we developed a novel colorimetric method to detect H2O2 and glucose in NaCl solutions. In the presence of H2O2, ssDNA adsorbed on the surface of CeO2 could be released and subsequently decorated AuNPs, resulting in a distinct color change of the aqueous solution from purple to red, which could be observed by the naked eye. Since H2O2 can be produced in the process of glucose oxidation by glucose oxidase (GOx), this approach can also be employed to detect glucose. By employing this sensing system, the detection limits for H2O2 and glucose are about 0.21 μM and 3.01 µM, respectively. Additionally, monitoring the content of glucose in blood serum samples was successfully achieved by the proposed strategy. This work opens a potential avenue for the quantitative detection of H2O2 and glucose in clinical diagnostics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers on Luminescent Sensing)
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