Childhood and Adolescence in the Digital Age

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2024) | Viewed by 10031

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychiatry, Tower Health/Phoenixville Hospital, Phoenixville, PA 19406, USA
2. Department of Psychiatry, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19102, USA
Interests: pediatric addictions; health risk behaviors; adolescent mental health; substance use disorders; public health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
Interests: cyberbullying; psychology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The present digital landscape raises many challenges for parents, teachers, and youth worldwide. Though the Internet and digital devices have many advantages, several risks must be considered when engaging in online activities, especially among children and adolescents. Previous research has presented considerable evidence regarding the negative outcomes of the misuse of digital technologies, screen time, social media, and the Internet in general. However, there is still a need for the gathering of evidence regarding how the digital age has changed parent–child relationships, academic engagement, moral behaviors, peer interaction, social support, and many other health and educational aspects. 

This Special Issue welcomes submissions from any discipline focused on the specific outcomes of digital use among children and adolescents. We particularly welcome multidisciplinary approaches examining different forms of technology use among youth and their outcomes regarding:

  • Attachment and digital learning during crisis control;
  • Parenting and morality in the era of artificial intelligence;
  • Online privacy and digital security;
  • Digital literacy and online safety education;
  • Gaming addiction and its impact on academic performance and social skills;
  • Online relationships and identity formation;
  • Parental monitoring of children's online activities;
  • Cyberbullying, cyber-gossip, breadcrumbing, and other technology-mediated behaviors.

Systematic reviews, case studies, descriptions of innovative practices, or impact evaluations of digitally based interventions for children and adolescents are also welcomed.

Dr. Saral Desai
Dr. Christopher P. Barlett
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digital use
  • children
  • adolescents
  • online privacy
  • digital parenting
  • cyberbullying

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 679 KiB  
Article
Digital Dilemma of Cyberbullying Victimization among High School Students: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Associations with Stress and Mental Well-Being
by Osama Mohamed Elsayed Ramadan, Majed Mowanes Alruwaili, Abeer Nuwayfi Alruwaili, Nadia Bassuoni Elsharkawy, Enas Mahrous Abdelaziz, Reda El Sayed El Badawy Ezzat and Eman Mahmoud Seif El-Nasr
Children 2024, 11(6), 634; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11060634 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 349
Abstract
Cyberbullying has emerged as a pervasive problem among high school students, with potentially severe consequences for their mental well-being. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence, risk factors, and associations of cyberbullying with stress and mental well-being among high school students in Zagazig, [...] Read more.
Cyberbullying has emerged as a pervasive problem among high school students, with potentially severe consequences for their mental well-being. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence, risk factors, and associations of cyberbullying with stress and mental well-being among high school students in Zagazig, Egypt. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 562 high school students using a random sampling technique. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire that included the Cyberbullying Scale, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Descriptive statistics, independent samples t-tests, multiple regression, mediation, and logistic regression analyses were employed for data analysis. The prevalence of cyberbullying victimization was 38.3%, with 20.6% exposed to two or three cyberbullying behaviors and 4.1% exposed to four or more. Female students, those under 18 years old, those with lower educational achievement, and those with higher daily internet use were more likely to experience cyberbullying. Cyberbullied students reported significantly higher levels of perceived stress and poorer mental well-being compared to non-cyberbullied students. Perceived stress likely mediated the relationship between cyberbullying victimization and general psychological health. Cyberbullying is a significant problem among high school students in Zagazig, Egypt, with detrimental effects on their stress levels and mental well-being. Targeted interventions and prevention strategies are needed to address cyberbullying and promote the well-being of adolescents in the digital age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Childhood and Adolescence in the Digital Age)
16 pages, 1529 KiB  
Article
Associating Parental Efficacy with the Utility of Smart Devices: A Cross-Sectional Study of Their Role in Alleviating Maternal Parenting Concerns among Infants Aged 6–11 Months
by Ryuta Onishi, Hanami Tone, Minori Kubota, Nana Chino and Funa Maruyama
Children 2023, 10(9), 1437; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children10091437 - 23 Aug 2023
Viewed by 979
Abstract
In digital societies, the use of smart devices to solve childcare problems has become commonplace. Mothers are influenced both positively and negatively by smart devices used to resolve childcare concerns. Focusing on parental self-efficacy, this study identified the factors associated with relief and [...] Read more.
In digital societies, the use of smart devices to solve childcare problems has become commonplace. Mothers are influenced both positively and negatively by smart devices used to resolve childcare concerns. Focusing on parental self-efficacy, this study identified the factors associated with relief and anxiety caused by the use of smart devices to eliminate parenting concerns among mothers with infants. A random sampling cross-sectional survey was administered to 257 Japanese mothers with infants aged 6–11 months. Structural equation modeling was used to explain the relief and anxiety caused by their use of smart devices in terms of maternal demographics, parental self-efficacy, smart-device dependence, and confidence in their ability to discriminate information. Mothers with high parental self-efficacy experienced increased relief and reduced anxiety by using smart devices to address concerns about child-rearing practices. Mothers who were highly dependent on smart devices felt more secure with their use of smart devices. Homemakers and highly educated mothers who used smart devices because of concerns regarding child health and development experienced more anxiety. Parenting professionals need to recognize the effectiveness of smart devices as a tool to relieve anxiety in parenting and provide additional support for parents to improve their parenting self-efficacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Childhood and Adolescence in the Digital Age)
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Review

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17 pages, 860 KiB  
Review
Screen Time and Its Health Consequences in Children and Adolescents
by Nikos Priftis and Demosthenes Panagiotakos
Children 2023, 10(10), 1665; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children10101665 - 8 Oct 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 8093
Abstract
Nowadays, children and adolescents are exposed to digital media (DM) from an early age. Therefore, specific guidelines have been published by the World Health Organization, whose aim is to limit daily screen time (ST) viewing. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, a rise in [...] Read more.
Nowadays, children and adolescents are exposed to digital media (DM) from an early age. Therefore, specific guidelines have been published by the World Health Organization, whose aim is to limit daily screen time (ST) viewing. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, a rise in DM use, and consequently ST viewing, was observed. More and more aspects of modern life are thought to be affected by excessive ST viewing. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to document the health effects of excessive ST viewing on children and adolescents. A narrative review was performed in searchable databases. In total, 43 original articles were considered. Excessive ST viewing was correlated with increased risk for obesity and other cardiometabolic risk factors, mental health, unhealthy dietary habits and eating disorders, and problems in development and child–parent relationships. Sleep, physical activity, eyesight, headaches, and the musculoskeletal system were negatively affected as well. However, the effect of ST was weighted by the type of media used and the way types of media were used. Other confounding factors were reported. There is evidence to suggest a negative correlation between excessive ST and youth health exists. Nevertheless, more research is needed if this correlation is to be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Childhood and Adolescence in the Digital Age)
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