Research Progress of Lung and Thoracic Abnormalities in Children

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2025 | Viewed by 621

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Pediatric and Neonatal Surgery Unit, Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital, 10126 Turin, Italy
Interests: thoracic and neonatal minimally invasive surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The knowledge about and optimal treatment of pulmonary congenital anomalies and thoracic deformities are non-marginal parts of Pediatric Surgery, but unfortunately, due to the rarity of the presentation, achieving adequate learning curves and excellent levels of care is often difficult for Pediatric Surgeons.

In addition, the operating indications are changing with time in light of new pathophysiological knowledges and what was once mandatory to operate on is now being questioned.

The same applies to pulmonary sequestrations for example, and to the new orthotic treatments for pectus carinatum and excavatum (Vacuum Bell and corsets).

The intent of this Special Issue is to take stock of the state of the art to date pulmonary and thoracic malformations in children.

Many thanks in advance for your precious contributions.

Dr. Riccardo Guanà
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • congenital pulmonary airways malformation
  • pulmonary sequestration
  • bronchogenic cyst
  • lobar emphysema
  • pectus excavatum
  • pectus carinatum

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

21 pages, 18819 KiB  
Review
Congenital Lung Malformations: A Pictorial Review of Imaging Findings and a Practical Guide for Diagnosis
by Giovanna Cancemi, Giulio Distefano, Gioele Vitaliti, Dario Milazzo, Giuseppe Terzo, Giuseppe Belfiore, Vincenzo Di Benedetto, Maria Grazia Scuderi, Maria Coronella, Andrea Giovanni Musumeci, Daniele Grippaldi, Letizia Antonella Mauro, Pietro Valerio Foti, Antonio Basile and Stefano Palmucci
Children 2024, 11(6), 638; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11060638 - 25 May 2024
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Abstract
The term congenital lung malformation (CLM) is used to describe a wide range of pathological conditions with different imaging and clinical manifestations. These anomalies stem from abnormal embryological lung development, potentially occurring across various stages of prenatal life. Their natural history can be [...] Read more.
The term congenital lung malformation (CLM) is used to describe a wide range of pathological conditions with different imaging and clinical manifestations. These anomalies stem from abnormal embryological lung development, potentially occurring across various stages of prenatal life. Their natural history can be variable, presenting in a wide range of severity levels and encompassing asymptomatic individuals who remain so until adulthood, as well as those who experience respiratory distress in the neonatal period. Through the PubMed database, we performed an extensive review of the literature in the fields of congenital lung abnormalities, including their diagnostic approach and findings. From our RIS-PACS database, we have selected cases with a final diagnosis of congenital lung malformation. Different diagnostic approaches have been selected, including clinical cases studied using plain radiograph, CT scan, prenatal ultrasound, and MR images. The most encountered anomalies can be classified into three categories: bronchopulmonary anomalies (congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAMs), congenital lobar hyperinflation, bronchial atresia, and bronchogenic cysts), vascular anomalies (arteriovenous malformation), and combined lung and vascular anomalies (scimitar syndrome and bronchopulmonary sequestration). CLM causes significant morbidity and mortality; therefore, the recognition of these abnormalities is necessary for optimal prenatal counseling and early peri- and postnatal management. This pictorial review aims to report relevant imaging findings in order to offer some clues for differential diagnosis both for radiologists and pediatric consultants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress of Lung and Thoracic Abnormalities in Children)
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