Special Issue "Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Children"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Integrative Pediatrics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Min Cheol Chang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Taegu, Korea
Interests: rehabilitation; image; neurological disorder; muculoskeletal disorder

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pediatric rehabilitation is a medical subspecialty that helps children with a disability and those at risk of a disability due to a disease or accident in early childhood before growth and development are complete to minimize the effects of their disability and help them to develop appropriately for their age. The diseases in which pediatric rehabilitation can be applied include cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, traumatic brain injury, developmental delay, and other neurological and orthopedic problems. This Special Issue, titled “Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Children”, covers advances in knowledge and presents the results of novel research on diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic methods for the above-mentioned diseases. We anticipate that this Special Issue will help medical staff working in pediatric rehabilitation departments to advance their practical knowledge on diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. We also hope that papers published in this Special Issue will generate ideas for new lines of research among researchers working in the field of pediatric rehabilitation.

Dr. Min Cheol Chang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatrics
  • rehabilitation
  • physical medicine
  • diagnosis
  • prognosis
  • treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Developmental Traits of Impulse Control Behavior in School Children under Controlled Attention, Motor Function, and Perception
Children 2021, 8(10), 922; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8100922 - 16 Oct 2021
Viewed by 178
Abstract
This research surveyed the characteristics of the developmental traits of impulse control behavior in children through parent-report questionnaires. After matching for gender and attention behavior, as well as controlling for variables (motor and perception) which might confound impulse control, 710 participants (355 girls [...] Read more.
This research surveyed the characteristics of the developmental traits of impulse control behavior in children through parent-report questionnaires. After matching for gender and attention behavior, as well as controlling for variables (motor and perception) which might confound impulse control, 710 participants (355 girls and 355 boys; grade, 1–5; age, 7–12 years) were recruited from a database of 1763 children. Results demonstrated that there was a significant difference between grade 1 and grade 5 in impulse control. Conversely, no significant differences were found when comparing other grades. The present findings indicate that a striking development of impulse control occurs from grade 4 to 5. Moreover, the plateau of impulse control development from grade 1 to 4 implies that a long transition period is needed to prepare children to develop future impulse control. In conclusion, the age-dependent maturation associated with stage-wise development is a critical characteristic of impulse control development in school age children. Further discussions are made regarding this characteristic, such as from the perspective of frontal lobe development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Children)
Article
Neurodevelopmental Outcomes after Congenital Heart Disease Surgery in Infancy: A 2-Year Serial Follow-Up
Children 2021, 8(10), 911; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8100911 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 167
Abstract
Background: The aim of this study is to assess the neurodevelopmental status of infant patients who underwent cardiac surgery in infancy and to investigate the factors affecting the neurodevelopmental status. Methods: This retrospective study included 108 patients who underwent cardiac surgery before the [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of this study is to assess the neurodevelopmental status of infant patients who underwent cardiac surgery in infancy and to investigate the factors affecting the neurodevelopmental status. Methods: This retrospective study included 108 patients who underwent cardiac surgery before the age of one. We used the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II to evaluate the neurodevelopmental status. All patients were analyzed according to the presence of the syndrome. Patients without the syndrome were analyzed according to the presence of brain lesions. Results: The mean mental developmental index (MDI) and the mean psychomotor developmental index (PDI) were 76.11 ± 20.17 and 65.95 ± 18.34, respectively, in the first evaluation, and 73.98 ± 22.53 and 69.48 ± 20.86, respectively, in the second evaluation. In the subgroup analysis, no significant difference was observed between the first evaluation and the second evaluation. Conclusions: No significant difference was observed in the degree of development of the patients in the two evaluation periods. Although the presence of syndrome, brain lesion, or gestational age affected the degree of developmental delay, more than half of the patients had developmental delay in the two evaluation periods in any of the subgroup. Therefore, the necessity of early screening and early rehabilitation intervention is emphasized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Children)
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