Risk and Resilience Factors Associated with Peer Victimization in Children and Adolescents

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2024) | Viewed by 17693

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019, USA
Interests: adolescence; peer victimization; loneliness; mental health; social pain
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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, The University of North Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75241, USA
Interests: agression; peer victimization; violence; morality; mental health; development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce an upcoming Special Issue of Children on “Risk and Resilience Factors Associated with Peer Victimization in Children and Adolescents.”

For full details, please read the full announcement below:

This Special Issue of Children will focus on “Risk and Resilience Factors Associated with Peer Victimization in Children and Adolescents.”

Estimates of the percentage of American children who report being repeatedly victimized by their peers have ranged from 10 to 30%. This is not just an American phenomenon; several international reports suggest that about 30% of children worldwide are bullied in any given month. Recently, bullying by peers has moved from the schoolyard to electronic mediums, such as cell phones and the Internet, making it even harder for the victim to escape the bullying.

Despite the fact that peer victimization is associated with poorer outcomes, not all children and adolescents who are victimized are condemned to these negative developmental consequences later in life. As such, we are interested in publishing empirical articles on one or more risk or resilience factors that influence peer victimization and its outcomes. For example, research that examines factors that influence the likelihood of being peer victimized (e.g., school climate, personality traits) will be considered.

Research also needs to understand better why some children experience long-term negative outcomes associated with victimization when others do not. Thus, this issue will focus on factors that may attenuate or exacerbate the victimization-health link (e.g., personality, genetic polymorphisms, social support). Finally, research that examines possible interventions that either decrease the rates of bullying or improve the health of the victimized child will be welcomed. Other topics related to peer victimization in schools, especially those that are theoretically or methodologically innovative are also of interest.

Dr. Lauri Jensen-Campbell
Dr. Priya Iyer-Eimerbrink
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • bullying
  • peer victimization
  • school climate
  • resilience
  • social support
  • personality
  • bullying inventions
  • cyber-bullying

Published Papers (3 papers)

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9 pages, 189 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Linkage between Exposure to Violence and Victimization, Coping, and Adjustment among Urban Youth: Findings from a Research Study on Adolescents
by Zina McGee, Chelsea Alexander, Khasya Cunningham, Celine Hamilton and Courtney James
Children 2019, 6(3), 36; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children6030036 - 27 Feb 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4388
Abstract
From examinations of the literature on the influence that exposure to violence and coping strategies have on delinquent behavior and emotional outcomes, this study addresses the association between violent victimization and the moderating effects of coping strategies among 500 African-American adolescents who exhibit [...] Read more.
From examinations of the literature on the influence that exposure to violence and coping strategies have on delinquent behavior and emotional outcomes, this study addresses the association between violent victimization and the moderating effects of coping strategies among 500 African-American adolescents who exhibit both externalizing behaviors such as delinquency and internalizing symptoms, including anxiety and depression. The investigation examines the development of the aforementioned adjustment problems in response to victimization, and the findings indicate a relationship between the specific indices of victimization, including peer violence, and the symptomatology and coping mechanisms utilized by the youth in this study. Suggestions for future research in this area are discussed. Full article
10 pages, 204 KiB  
Article
Risk Factors for Peer Victimization among Middle and High School Students
by Rebecca A. Vidourek and Keith A. King
Children 2019, 6(1), 11; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children6010011 - 15 Jan 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5348
Abstract
Peer victimization at school is a pressing public health issue. Peer victimization has a deleterious impact on the victim and can lead to lifelong negative outcomes such as depression. The purpose of the present study is to examine peer victimization and potential individual, [...] Read more.
Peer victimization at school is a pressing public health issue. Peer victimization has a deleterious impact on the victim and can lead to lifelong negative outcomes such as depression. The purpose of the present study is to examine peer victimization and potential individual, school, and peer correlates in a national sample of middle and high school students. A secondary data analysis of the School Crime and Safety survey was conducted to investigate study aims. Greater than one in 20 (7.2%) of students reported peer victimization at school. Multiple individual factors were found to increase the odds of victimization including grade level, grades received, and school avoidance among other variables. School and peer factors were also found to be significant. Study findings may be useful to school personnel for reducing peer victimization at school. Specific recommendations for school personnel are offered. Full article

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12 pages, 380 KiB  
Brief Report
Does Peer Rejection Moderate the Associations among Cyberbullying Victimization, Depression, and Anxiety among Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder?
by Michelle F. Wright and Sebastian Wachs
Children 2019, 6(3), 41; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children6030041 - 4 Mar 2019
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 7330
Abstract
While the consequences of cyberbullying victimization have received some attention in the literature, to date, little is known about the multiple types of strains in adolescents’ lives, such as whether cyberbullying victimization and peer rejection increase their vulnerability to depression and anxiety. Even [...] Read more.
While the consequences of cyberbullying victimization have received some attention in the literature, to date, little is known about the multiple types of strains in adolescents’ lives, such as whether cyberbullying victimization and peer rejection increase their vulnerability to depression and anxiety. Even though some research found that adolescents with disabilities show higher risk for cyberbullying victimization, most research has focused on typically developing adolescents. Thus, the present study focused on examining the moderating effect of peer rejection in the relationships between cyberbullying victimization, depression, and anxiety among adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. There were 128 participants (89% male; ages ranging from 11–16 years old) with autism spectrum disorder in the sixth, seventh, or eighth grade at 16 middle schools in the United States. Participants completed questionnaires on cyberbullying victimization, peer rejection, depression, and anxiety. Results revealed that cyberbullying victimization was associated positively with peer rejection, anxiety, and depression among adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Further, peer rejection was linked positively with depression and anxiety. Peer rejection moderated the positive relationship between cyberbullying victimization and depression, but not anxiety. Implications for prevention programs and future research are discussed. Full article
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