Special Issue "Digital Advancements in the Psychological Management of Pediatric Chronic Illness"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Patricia A. Richardson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departments of Pediatric Psychology and Pediatric Pain and Palliative Medicine, Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA
Department of Pediatrics and Human Development, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: pediatric chronic pain; behavioral health interventions; self-management; digital health
Dr. Natoshia R. Cunningham
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Family Medicine, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA
Interests: pediatric psychology; pain; anxiety; cognitive behavioral therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Digitally delivered healthcare is rapidly expanding across pediatrics, and specifically in behavioral medicine. The proliferation of digital management (e.g., eHealth, mHealth, and telehealth) and data collection (e.g., wearable sensors, ecological momentary assessment, and passive mobile sensing) systems, as well as novel adaptive clinical trial designs, has shifted the way we think about engaging with patients, extended the reach of specialized care, and moved the field closer to personalized medicine. These advancements have been made possible by improvements in digital technology and near ubiquitous access to the Internet and Internet-accessible personal devices for children across the developmental spectrum and their families. Over the past year, the access to digital healthcare has been enhanced during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional study into the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of these strategies is critical. With appropriate evaluation, digital healthcare is primed to continue improving the lives of children and families living with chronic conditions.

This Special Issue will explore a range of digital advancements in the psychological assessment and treatment of pediatric chronic illness with the ultimate goal of charting a pathway for new and promising directions for the field.

Dr. Natoshia R. Cunningham
Dr. Patricia A. Richardson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatrics
  • behavioral medicine
  • psychology
  • ehealth
  • mhealth
  • chronic illness
  • self-management

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Engagement during a Mixed In-Person and Remotely Delivered Psychological Intervention for Youth with Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders and Anxiety
Children 2021, 8(9), 775; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8090775 - 02 Sep 2021
Viewed by 548
Abstract
Functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPD) are common disabling pain conditions frequently associated with co-occurring mental health problems such as anxiety. Psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have been shown to be effective. Therefore, it is important to understand participant engagement (i.e., [...] Read more.
Functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPD) are common disabling pain conditions frequently associated with co-occurring mental health problems such as anxiety. Psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have been shown to be effective. Therefore, it is important to understand participant engagement (i.e., use of intervention tools) to such approaches, and if engagement impacts treatment response. The Aim to Decrease Anxiety and Pain Treatment (ADAPT) is an effective psychological treatment approach using a blend of in-person sessions and interventionist phone support with self-paced web modules to manage pain and anxiety. The current study used a mixed-methods approach to investigate micro-level and macro-level participant engagement during the ADAPT program. In-person/phone session attendance was high (>95%) although scheduling adjustments were common (25.5%). Varied levels of engagement with web tools were observed. Thematic analysis also revealed variability in patterns of use. Additionally, while participants indicated they generally understood how to use certain skills (e.g., problem solving, detective thinking), and these skills were effective in managing symptoms during treatment, these activities were generally underutilized. Further, participant engagement did not predict response to the ADAPT intervention. These findings are important as the demand for accessible psychotherapeutic tools to manage pain and anxiety is likely to remain high. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Using Technology to Assess Bidirectionality between Daily Pain and Physical Activity: The Role of Marginalization during Emerging Adulthood
Children 2021, 8(9), 756; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8090756 - 30 Aug 2021
Viewed by 402
Abstract
Emerging adulthood is often overlooked as a developmental time period critical to shaping future health outcomes. Recurrent pain is a commonly experienced health concern within this age group, particularly headaches and low back pain, and early experiences of recurrent pain are related to [...] Read more.
Emerging adulthood is often overlooked as a developmental time period critical to shaping future health outcomes. Recurrent pain is a commonly experienced health concern within this age group, particularly headaches and low back pain, and early experiences of recurrent pain are related to subsequent chronic pain and disability. Furthermore, adults from marginalized populations report more frequent and severe recurrent pain. Many studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effect of physical activity on pain relief; however, others have demonstrated that physical activity can also exacerbate pain symptoms. Therefore, the current study aimed to (1) assess a bidirectional relationship between reported pain and engagement in physical activity among an emerging adult sample (N = 265) and (2) determine whether sociodemographic factors moderate this relationship. Using longitudinal daily reported pain and ActiGraph monitor data collected over two weeks, a novel dynamic structural equation modeling approach was employed. Results indicated no significant cross-lagged relationships between pain and physical activity, and no significant moderation effects. These findings suggest that a bidirectional relationship does not exist among a diverse college sample of emerging adults even after considering sociodemographic moderators. Excellent retention and few missing data suggest that using accelerometers and daily diaries are feasible methods to collect data in this population. Sample considerations and future analytical approaches are discussed. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Evaluating Telehealth Implementation in the Context of Pediatric Chronic Pain Treatment during COVID-19
Children 2021, 8(9), 764; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8090764 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 554
Abstract
Telehealth has emerged as a promising healthcare delivery modality due to its ability to ameliorate traditional access-level barriers to treatment. In response to the onset of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, multidisciplinary pain clinics either rapidly built telehealth infrastructure from the ground up [...] Read more.
Telehealth has emerged as a promising healthcare delivery modality due to its ability to ameliorate traditional access-level barriers to treatment. In response to the onset of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, multidisciplinary pain clinics either rapidly built telehealth infrastructure from the ground up or ramped up existing services. As the use of telehealth increases, it is critical to develop data collection frameworks that guide implementation. This applied review provides a theoretically-based approach to capitalize on existing data sources and collect novel data to inform virtually delivered care in the context of pediatric pain care. Reviewed multisource data are (1) healthcare administrative data; (2) electronic chart review; (3) clinical health registries; and (4) stakeholder feedback. Preliminary telehealth data from an interdisciplinary pediatric chronic pain management clinic (PPMC) serving youth ages 8–17 years are presented to illustrate how relevant implementation outcomes can be extracted from multisource data. Multiple implementation outcomes were assessed, including telehealth adoption rates, patient clinical symptoms, and mixed-method patient-report telehealth satisfaction. This manuscript provides an applied roadmap to leverage existing data sources and incorporate stakeholder feedback to guide the implementation of telehealth in pediatric chronic pain settings through and beyond COVID-19. Strengths and limitations of the modeled data collection approach are discussed within the broader context of implementation science. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop