Special Issue "The Roles of Farmers and Other Actors in Developing Adaptation Strategies to Climate Change and Variability"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Christopher Robin Bryant
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
Interests: the adaptation of human activities to climatic change, especially agriculture; sustainable community development; rural development; land use planning; strategic management/planning of development including agriculture; community participation; the dynamics and planning of urban agriculture; including pioneer work on adaptation behavior under stressful conditions; sustainable transport policies
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and variability (CCV) is broadly accepted as a reality. A major activity that is affected by CCV is agriculture, in different ways in different countries and territories. How does agriculture cope with CCV? Who can be involved in influencing the decisions taken by farmers? In this Special Issue, the first focus is on farmers individually and in groups. However, it is also important to understand the potential and actual roles of other actors, e.g. different levels of government. Some adaptation strategies to CCV can be put in place by individual farmers, but depending on the culture in a specific territory, different groups of farmers can also reflect on strategies that require the support of other actors, e.g. local and regional governments and organizations related to water management. This Special Issue is interested in research into farmer adaptation to CCV, as well as the involvement of different levels of government and other actors and, in some jurisdictions, the roles of effective crop insurance programs that do not lead to maladaptation on the part of farmers.

Prof. Dr. Christopher Bryant
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agricultural adaptation to CCV
  • climate change
  • farmers
  • government roles
  • crop insurance programs

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Indigenous Knowledge and Farmer Perceptions of Climate and Ecological Changes in the Bamenda Highlands of Cameroon: Insights from the Bui Plateau
Climate 2019, 7(12), 138; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cli7120138 - 08 Dec 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1949
Abstract
Anticipating seasonal and shorter time scale dynamics to farming practices is primordial for indigenous farmers’ resilience under extreme environmental conditions, where climate change is a menace to agro-hydro-ecological systems. This paper assesses the effectiveness of indigenous farmers’ knowledge and aptitude to read weather [...] Read more.
Anticipating seasonal and shorter time scale dynamics to farming practices is primordial for indigenous farmers’ resilience under extreme environmental conditions, where climate change is a menace to agro-hydro-ecological systems. This paper assesses the effectiveness of indigenous farmers’ knowledge and aptitude to read weather signs for informed decisions on their daily and seasonal activities. Such climate-proof development is anchored on indigenous people’s knowledge and perceptions in circumstances where the dearth of scientific evidence or information exists as in Cameroon. The study is based on eight focus group discussions and a survey of 597 farming households in seven agro-ecological basins on the Bui Plateau of the Bamenda Highlands. The results indicate that indigenous smallholder farmers value their ability to accurately observe and anticipate local conditions in various ways to serve their local realities more aptly than outside forecasts. Such local knowledge should thus exercise a complementary role weave in a local climate information understanding system that replicates ecological variability. Full article
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Article
Do Farmers Perceive the Trends of Local Climate Variability Accurately? An Analysis of Farmers’ Perceptions and Meteorological Data in Myanmar
Climate 2019, 7(5), 64; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cli7050064 - 05 May 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1992
Abstract
With the existing state of issues related to global climate change, the accuracy of farmers’ perceptions of climate is critically important if they plan to implement appropriate adaptation measures in their farming. This article evaluated if farmers perceive the trends of local climate [...] Read more.
With the existing state of issues related to global climate change, the accuracy of farmers’ perceptions of climate is critically important if they plan to implement appropriate adaptation measures in their farming. This article evaluated if farmers perceive the trends of local climate variability accurately, and was verified by the historical meteorological data analysis. Ordered probit perception models were applied in this study to determine the factors influencing the accuracy of farmer perception. It was observed that farmers’ perceptions of the rainfall amount during the early, mid, and late monsoon periods were highly accurate, and they also accurately perceived summer temperature change, but less accuracy of perception was observed of the temperate changes of the winter and monsoon seasons. Access to weekly weather information, participation in agricultural trainings, farming experience, and education level of the farmer were the major factors determining the accuracy of perception in this study. Based on the empirical results, this study suggested policy implications for (a) the locally specified weather information distribution, and (b) integration of weather information into agricultural training programs, which are available to the farming community to enhance the government implantation of the Myanmar Climate Smart Agriculture Strategy and Myanmar Climate Change Master Plan 2018–2030. Full article
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