Special Issue "Recent Advancement in the Management of COVID-19"

A special issue of COVID (ISSN 2673-8112).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Swarna Jaiswal
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Food Science and Environmental Health, College of Sciences and Health, Technological University Dublin, D07 ADY7 Dublin, Ireland
Interests: antimicrobial agents; antimicrobial coatings; active/intelligent packaging; biodegradable polymer; biomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Amit K. Jaiswal
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Food Science and Environmental Health, College of Sciences and Health, Technological University Dublin, D07 ADY7 Dublin, Ireland
Interests: food engineering; industrial biotechnology; biobased chemicals; nutraceuticals; waste valorisation; novel food processing technologies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

The COVID-19 outbreak was declared a global pandemic by the WHO in early 2020, causing a major threat to public health worldwide, with 187 million cases and 4.00 million deaths to date. The symptoms of COVID-19 disease include fever, cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, a loss of taste and smell, and gastrointestinal issues. It is either asymptomatic or symptomatic with a high risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), devastating pneumonia with bilateral lung infiltrates, cytokine storm syndrome, shock, and death. The COVID-19 pandemic has created a global crisis in both public health as well as the economy, thus creating the need for rapid development in diagnosis, fast-paced vaccine development, and associated medical research using modern technologies. The various management strategies are functioning to overcome the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, the aim of this Special Issue is to present innovative ideas and recent advances in the management of the COVID-19 pandemic, including diagnostics, current development in vaccine, and advancement in treatment strategies aside from vaccines.  

In this Special Issue, we invite you to submit original research, review articles, and opinions in the broad area of COVID-19.

Dr. Swarna Jaiswal
Dr. Amit K. Jaiswal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. COVID is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diagnostic methods
  • vaccine development
  • therapeutic
  • immune response
  • advancement in treatment
  • pathogenesis
  • immunotherapy
  • epidemiology
  • knowledge and practice

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
COVID-19 Related Knowledge, Risk Perceptions, and Practices amongst Irish Residents
COVID 2021, 1(1), 166-185; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/covid1010015 - 31 Jul 2021
Viewed by 415
Abstract
The COVID-19 disease was declared a global pandemic by the 11th of February 2020, presenting a major threat to public health worldwide. Success in the battle against COVID-19 depends on public adherence to control measures. Their adherence is greatly affected by their knowledge, [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 disease was declared a global pandemic by the 11th of February 2020, presenting a major threat to public health worldwide. Success in the battle against COVID-19 depends on public adherence to control measures. Their adherence is greatly affected by their knowledge, perceptions, and practices; therefore, the aim of this study was to assess and understand the knowledge, perceptions, practices, and trusted information sources of COVID-19 among Irish residents. A quantitative survey was performed by means of an online questionnaire, which comprised five sections to collect data regarding demographics, knowledge, perceptions, practices, and information sources. A total of 1007 participants completed the online survey between February and March 2021. The majority of respondents (69.4% female and 30.3% male) had a correct rate of knowledge (88%) and practices (68.1%), with health organisations being the most trusted information source (70.7%); 87.4% understand good mask etiquette. Only 53.7% agreed that closing schools or mass gathering events are an effective way to reduce the spread of the virus, while 81.3% are aware that COVID-19 is more severe than the flu; 64% of respondents said that the pandemic has negatively affected their mental health. It was observed that a higher level of knowledge is positively correlated with good practices. The study concludes that most of the respondents have shown a good level of knowledge and right practices towards the COVID-19 pandemic, and that the higher the level of knowledge of individuals, the better the COVID-19 safety practices are that they perform. It has been observed that the continuous improvement on an individual’s level of knowledge of COVID-19 is essential to maintain good safety practices and reduce the spread. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancement in the Management of COVID-19)
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