Special Issue "Considering Host-Biomaterials and Microbial Interactions in Oral Health and Their Impact on the Development of Dental Material"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Dental Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yoav Finer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Dentistry and Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 124 Edward Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1G6, Canada
2. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
Interests: biomaterials; prosthodontics; host–biomaterials and –microbial interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Traditional dental material developments have focused on physical and mechanical properties. However, dental materials are not inert and interact with the host and oral bacteria. The effect of host and microbial degradative activities on the materials and the tooth, and the impact on oral health, as well as the reciprocal effect of the materials and the material’s by-products on the host and bacteria, will be the focus of this Special Issue. Recent developments in addressing the above challenges by developing testing methods that consider the host–biomaterials and –microbial interactions and challenges, and the development of innovative restorative, endodontic and implant coating biomaterials that are resistant to host and microbial degradation and/or actively counteracting these activities and modulating microbial and host response to the materials, will be covered in this Special Issue. We are welcoming relevant original studies, systematic and narrative reviews related to host-biomaterials and microbial interactions on oral health, and the development of innovative dental biomaterials that consider these interactions for this Special Issue. All submissions will be subject to a rigorous review process, as are submissions to the regular issues of Dentistry Journal.

Sincerely,

Yoav Finer, DMD, PhD, FRCD(C), George Zarb Nobel-Biocare Chair in Prosthodontic

Faculty of Dentistry, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto

Prof. Dr. Yoav Finer

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral health
  • dental biomaterials
  • dental restoration performance
  • host–biomaterial and –microbial interactions
  • biodegradation
  • enzyme
  • oral bacteria
  • immune system
  • restorative dentistry
  • dental implants
  • endodontics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Improper Light Curing of Bulkfill Composite Drives Surface Changes and Increases S. mutans Biofilm Growth as a Pathway for Higher Risk of Recurrent Caries around Restorations
Dent. J. 2021, 9(8), 83; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9080083 - 30 Jul 2021
Viewed by 558
Abstract
How dentists cure a resin-based material has deleterious effects on the material’s properties and its interaction with surrounding dental tissues. Biofilm accumulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of carious lesions around dental restorations, with its composition manifesting expressed dysbiosis in patients suffering [...] Read more.
How dentists cure a resin-based material has deleterious effects on the material’s properties and its interaction with surrounding dental tissues. Biofilm accumulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of carious lesions around dental restorations, with its composition manifesting expressed dysbiosis in patients suffering from dental caries. To evaluate the influence of varying radiant exposure on the degree of conversion (DC%), Streptococcus mutans biofilm growth, and surface roughness of bulk-fill composites under different light-curing conditions. Two light-curing units (LCU) at 600 and 1000 mW/cm2 were used to simulate curing conditions with different angulations (∢20° and ∢35°) or 2 mm-distance displacements of the LCU tip. The radiant exposure (RE) was assessed, and the composites were analyzed for DC%. Biofilm formation was induced over the bulk-fill composites and analyzed via colony-forming units counting and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface roughness was analyzed via a profilometer and SEM after biofilm formation. Curing conditions with different angulation or displacement decreased RE compared to the “optimal condition”. The moderately (∢35°) angulated LCU tip and low (600 mW/cm2) radiant emittance significantly reduced the DC% (p < 0.05). The difference in DC% between the top and bottom of the composites ranged from 8 to 11% for 600 mW/cm2 and 10 to 20% for 1000 mW/cm2. Greater S. mutans biofilm and surface changes were found in composites with non-optimal RE delivery (e.g., tip displacement and angulation) (p < 0.05). Inadequate polymerization of bulk-fill composites was associated with more biofilm accumulation and surface topography changes. Overall, non-optimally performed curing procedures reduced the amount of delivered RE, which led to low DC%, more biofilm formation, and higher surface roughness. The improper light-curing of bulk-fill composites compromises their physicochemical and biological properties, which could lead to inferior clinical performance and reduced restorative treatments’ longevity. Full article
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