Special Issue "Special Care Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Arkadiusz Dziedzic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Conservative Dentistry with Endodontics, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, SUM, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Pl. Akademicki 17, 41-902 Bytom, Poland
Interests: special care dentistry; oral medicine; integrated dentistry; endodontics; periodontology; conscious sedation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As professionals, we have a particular duty to provide a wide range of dental care for the individuals who present themselves with various systemic medical problems, learning and physical disabilities, cognitive impairments, as well as young patients with congenital diseases, ADHD, or autistic spectrum disorders. Moreover, as a result of current demographic changes, our patients receive more complex pharmacological therapies which can potentially interfere with certain dental procedures. On a daily basis, dental practitioners face an increasing number of patients undergoing chemo- and radiotherapy, which impact on oral health and cause acute symptoms affecting patients’ quality of life. As a result, we must tackle complex treatment plans, including restorative care provided for elderly groups of patients with underlying medical problems for which they are taking multiple medications. Mental capacity assessment, valid/informed consent, specialist consultations, and ‘best interest meeting’ with other individuals involved in a patient’s care are currently becoming an essential part of routine dental practice, reflecting the real complexity of individual treatment planning. The growing demand for specialist dental care as a result of more complex oral health problems has stimulated the establishment of new academic training curricula, and this trend has appeared all over the world. Undoubtedly, dental students need to acquire more integrated and feasible approaches during education to supporting them in being well prepared when dealing with challenging clinical cases. Over the last decades, general dental practitioners have noticed a significant change in reducing exodontia in favor of more conservative approaches, due to the ageing population and demographic shift. Finally, it is worth mentioning that the tendency of replacing dental general anesthesia with conscious sedation services might also be applicable when managing patients with dental phobia or learning disabilities.

I hereby invite to contribute to this Special Issue of Dental Journal. It is hoped that this Special Issue will improve our knowledge of special care dentistry provision for the most vulnerable groups of our patients. By joining our forces, we aim to promote clinical excellence by reducing inequalities related to the access to primary and specialist dental care.

Dr. Arkadiusz Dziedzic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Medically compromised groups, complex medical co-morbidities
  • Multidrug pharmacotherapy
  • Bisphosphonates, new oral anticoagulants
  • Oral medicine, oral manifestations of systemic diseases
  • Interdisciplinary and integrated approach
  • Conscious dental sedation, general anesthesia
  • Gerodontology

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Getting Special Care Dentistry Ready for a Foreseeable Future. Reinstated Services and Mitigation Measures to Curb COVID-19 Disruption
Dent. J. 2021, 9(2), 16; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9020016 - 31 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1061
Abstract
In March 2020, dental care providers, including special care dentistry (SCD) services, had to face an extraordinary change of their standard operating procedures (SOP), with deferred domiciliary dental care, withholding conscious dental sedation services and disrupted routine care [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Care Dentistry)
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Editorial
Special Care Dentistry and COVID-19 Outbreak: What Lesson Should We Learn?
Dent. J. 2020, 8(2), 46; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj8020046 - 09 May 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2771
Abstract
The recent outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the declaration of pandemic by the World Health Organization have made an enormous impact on medical and dental care across the world. The [...] Read more.
The recent outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the declaration of pandemic by the World Health Organization have made an enormous impact on medical and dental care across the world. The current COVID-19 situation may teach dental teams a better approach and optimal ways concerning the management of patients with special needs, by bringing people together to discuss and optimize standards of care, as often happens in challenging situations. We can always learn new things that turn out to be valuable and useful even in exceptionally difficult times, and in addition, dental services can benefit from enabling positive attitudes and introducing constructive changes. Clinicians just need to keep in mind that adjustment to a new future reality appears inevitable for both patients and professionals who provide care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Care Dentistry)

Research

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Article
Effects of Different Application Times of Silver Diamine Fluoride on Mineral Precipitation in Demineralized Dentin
Dent. J. 2021, 9(6), 70; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9060070 - 14 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1209
Abstract
Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is a cost-effective method for arresting active dental caries. However, the limited cooperation of patients may lead to an SDF application time that is shorter than the recommended 1–3 min for carious lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study [...] Read more.
Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is a cost-effective method for arresting active dental caries. However, the limited cooperation of patients may lead to an SDF application time that is shorter than the recommended 1–3 min for carious lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of different application times of SDF on the degree of mineral precipitation in demineralized dentin. Demineralized dentin specimens from permanent maxillary molars were treated by applying 38% SDF for 30, 60, or 180 s. Water was applied in the control group. The specimens were immersed in simulated body fluid for 2 weeks, and the mineral precipitation in demineralized dentin was then analyzed using FTIR-ATR, SEM-EDX, and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM). The FTIR-ATR results showed a significant increase in mineral precipitation in the 180 s group after 1 week. However, after 2 weeks, the SRXTM images indicated comparable mineral density between the 30, 60, and 180 s groups. The precipitation of silver chloride and calcium phosphate crystals that occluded dentinal tubules was similar in all experimental groups. In conclusion, an application time of either 30, 60, or 180 s promoted a comparable degree of mineral precipitation in demineralized dentin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Care Dentistry)
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Other

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Case Report
Oral Healthcare and Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Early Recognition, Dental Management and Case Report
Dent. J. 2021, 9(9), 108; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9090108 - 12 Sep 2021
Viewed by 287
Abstract
A 47-year-old Caucasian man, in good general, oral and periodontal health, presented with a non-bleeding bluish lesion on the back of his tongue, presumably due to an ecchymotic area of traumatic origin which was left untreated. The day after, other ecchymotic-type lesions on [...] Read more.
A 47-year-old Caucasian man, in good general, oral and periodontal health, presented with a non-bleeding bluish lesion on the back of his tongue, presumably due to an ecchymotic area of traumatic origin which was left untreated. The day after, other ecchymotic-type lesions on the mucous membranes of the cheeks and the upper lip, a bleeding lesion at the apex of the tongue and gingivorrhagia, along with petechiae on the back, scalp, lower limbs and feet, occurred, with rapid clinical deterioration, requiring immediate hospitalization. Oral, dermatological, and hematological evaluations lead to idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) diagnosis and hydrocortisone prescription, with a complete recovery in the next few days.The presented case of ITP, with early intra-oral manifestations, aimed both to emphasize the role of oral healthcare workers in theearly recognition of ITP, which may be especially relevant for those cases with extremely fast platelet depletion, high risk of internal bleeding and consequent potentially fatal complications, and in the differential diagnosis of the diseasethat may be aided by the diagnostic protocol described, and to provide dentists with recommendations on oral care management of cases of ITP, both in dental and multi-disciplinary settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Care Dentistry)
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Case Report
Ankylosed Primary Molar in a Japanese Child with Hypophosphatasia
Dent. J. 2021, 9(1), 3; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9010003 - 29 Dec 2020
Viewed by 1487
Abstract
Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare genetic disorder; affected patients may experience early exfoliation of primary teeth, especially anterior teeth. However, there have been few reports regarding longitudinal follow-up for primary teeth, especially posterior teeth, until their replacement with permanent teeth. Here, we describe [...] Read more.
Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare genetic disorder; affected patients may experience early exfoliation of primary teeth, especially anterior teeth. However, there have been few reports regarding longitudinal follow-up for primary teeth, especially posterior teeth, until their replacement with permanent teeth. Here, we describe a patient with HPP who underwent follow-up from 1 to 9 years of age. A 14-month-old boy was referred to our hospital with the chief complaint of early loss of primary anterior teeth. He was diagnosed with odonto-type HPP by his pediatrician, due to low serum alkaline phosphatase concentration and early exfoliation of primary teeth with bone hypomineralization. The patient experienced exfoliation of three additional primary anterior teeth by 4 years and 1 month of age. Partial dentures were applied for space maintenance; there were no problems regarding subsequent replacement with permanent teeth in the anterior region. However, the primary mandibular right first molar appeared to be submerged when the patient was 8 years and 3 months of age; the severity of submergence was greater when the patient was 9 years of age. The affected primary molar was considered to be ankylosed; it was extracted when the patient was 9 years and 4 months of age. Histopathological analysis of the tooth revealed disturbed cementum formation, which is a typical characteristic of teeth in patients with HPP. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize that the disturbed cementum formation could lead to susceptibility to early exfoliation of anterior teeth, as well as occurrence of ankylosis involving posterior teeth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Care Dentistry)
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