Special Issue "Study of Relationship between Oral Health and Systemic Health"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 April 2021).

Special Issue Editor

DDS MSD, Prof. Leena Palomo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Periodontics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA and Private Practice of Periodontics, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
Interests: oral-systemic links in periodontitis and peri-implantitis; innovation through multidisciplinary and interprofessional care

Special Issue Information

People are living longer, fuller lives than ever before while managing chronic systemic conditions, and environmental risks. The interplay of how these conditions and interventions affect oral health, and how compromised oral health affects the host, drives the need to understand the intricacies of host immune-inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens in a fast-increasing number of patients. Globally, we strive to give underserved populations access to the care they deserve. Research elucidates the quality of life that comes from a healthy dentition has far reaching impacts. For example, healthy dentition allows for balanced, fiber- and protein-rich nutrition required to maintain glycemic control; it allows for comfortable speaking and pain-free function; and it is a large part of high esthetics, which are obviously in great demand because of the psycho-social impact of a great smile.

Lighting our path from research to clinical application, we take advantage of innovative technologies and multidisciplinary and interprofessional contributions. The relationships between oral and systemic health have been long been researched and published. Like any longstanding topic of research, the concepts proven invalid through well designed studies and meta-analytic analysis are discarded, while those concepts that stand up to evaluation and re-evaluation shape clinical practice. Unfortunately, in this process, information and misinformation intermingle through the sieve of individual opinion on the path to clinical implementation. The purpose of this Issue is to take a close, evidence-based look at the oral-systemic link in an attempt to apply it to multidisciplinary dental practice needed to manage increasing numbers of complex cases.

DDS MSD, Prof. Leena Palomo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • periodontal disease
  • inflammation
  • wellness

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Dentinogenesis Imperfecta and Caries in Osteogenesis Imperfecta among Vietnamese Children
Dent. J. 2021, 9(5), 49; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj9050049 - 27 Apr 2021
Viewed by 597
Abstract
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder characterized by increased bone fragility and low bone mass, caused mainly by mutations in collagen type I encoding genes. The current study aimed to evaluate dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), oral manifestations and caries status of OI children. [...] Read more.
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder characterized by increased bone fragility and low bone mass, caused mainly by mutations in collagen type I encoding genes. The current study aimed to evaluate dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), oral manifestations and caries status of OI children. Sixty-eight children (41 males, 27 females) aged from 3 to 17 years old (mean 9 ± 4.13) participated in the study. Participants were classified into three OI type groups (I—2 cases, III—31 cases and IV—35 cases). Clinical examination and an orthopantomogram were used to obtain prevalences and associations of DI, caries status, malocclusion, crossbite, open bite, eruption, impaction and missing teeth with OI. The prevalence of DI among OI patients was 47.1%, more common in OI type III than type IV. The yellow-brown discoloration type was more vulnerable to attrition than the opalescent-grey one in the primary dentition. OI seemed not to have a high risk of caries; the prevalence of caries was 69.1%. A high incidence of malocclusion, crossbite and open bite was observed. In-depth oral information would provide valuable data for better dental management in OI patients. Parents and general doctors should pay more attention to dental care to prevent caries and premature tooth loss. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study of Relationship between Oral Health and Systemic Health)
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Article
Formative and Pilot Study for an Effectiveness-Implementation Hybrid Cluster Randomized Trial to Incorporate Oral Health Activities into Pediatric Well-Child Visits
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 101; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj8030101 - 01 Sep 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1400
Abstract
Background: Dental caries in pediatric patients are noted to have broad impacts on systemic health and well-being. Thus, utilizing an effectiveness-implementation hybrid I design, the Pediatric Providers Against Cavities in Children’s Teeth (PACT) trial is investigating multi-level interventions at the practice (incorporation [...] Read more.
Background: Dental caries in pediatric patients are noted to have broad impacts on systemic health and well-being. Thus, utilizing an effectiveness-implementation hybrid I design, the Pediatric Providers Against Cavities in Children’s Teeth (PACT) trial is investigating multi-level interventions at the practice (incorporation of oral health in electronic medical record [EMR]) and provider levels (theory-based didactic and skills training to communicate oral health facts to parent/caregiver, give a prescription to see a dentist and a list of area dentists) to increase dental utilization among 3 to 6 year old Medicaid-enrolled children attending well-child visits (WCV). The formative and pilot work for the larger main trial are presented. Methods: Formative work—Focus groups with 26 participants (Community leaders, providers, parent/caregivers); and key informant interviews with practice leadership (n = 4). Topics discussed were: core oral health (OH) information to communicate at WCVs and study logistics. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using Atlas.ti; Pilot study was refined using the formative findings and was conducted at two pediatric practices to test the implementation of: the provider didactic and skills training curriculum; EMR incorporation of four OH questions; logistics of incorporating OH activities at a WCV; and parent/caregiver recruitment. Results: Formative work showed that providers and parent/caregivers required knowledge of dental caries, and a list of area Medicaid-accepting dentists. Providers and practice leadership advised on the logistics of incorporating oral health into WCVs. All groups suggested asking parent/caregivers their preferred method of contact and emphasizing importance of OH to motivate participation. Utilizing these findings, the curriculum and protocol was revised. The pilot study in two practices successfully implemented the protocol as follows: all seven providers were trained in two 45 min didactic education and skills session; incorporation of OH questions into practices EMR; recruited 86 child-parent dyads (95% participation) at the WCV; providers delivered the OH intervention to parent/caregivers in <2 min and 90% completed EMR documentation of OH questions. These findings were instrumental in finalizing the main PACT trial in 18 practices. The RE-AIM framework is used in the main trial to collect effectiveness and implementation measures at baseline and follow-up visits. Conclusions: The formative and pilot findings were instrumental in refining the OH intervention and protocol which has resulted in successful implementation of the main trial. Trial Registration: Clinical trials.gov, Registered 9 November 2017, NCT03385629. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study of Relationship between Oral Health and Systemic Health)
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Review

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Review
Periodontal Health and Systemic Conditions
Dent. J. 2020, 8(4), 130; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj8040130 - 19 Nov 2020
Viewed by 1380
Abstract
According to the new classification proposed by the recent 2017 World Workshop on Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases and Conditions, periodontitis, necrotizing periodontal diseases, periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases, and systemic diseases or conditions affecting the periodontal supporting tissues, are considered as [...] Read more.
According to the new classification proposed by the recent 2017 World Workshop on Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases and Conditions, periodontitis, necrotizing periodontal diseases, periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases, and systemic diseases or conditions affecting the periodontal supporting tissues, are considered as separate entities. Scientific evidence has demonstrated that periodontal diseases are not just simple bacterial infections but rather complex diseases of multifactorial complexity that interplay with the subgingival microbes, the host immune, and inflammatory responses. Despite dental plaque biofilm being considered the primary risk factor for periodontitis in the vast majority of patients that dentists encounter on a daily basis, there are other factors that can also contribute and/or accelerate pathologic progressive attachment loss. In this article, the authors aim to briefly review and discuss the present evidence regarding the association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases and conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study of Relationship between Oral Health and Systemic Health)
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