Special Issue "On Contemporary Architectural Design and the Rehabilitation of Built Heritage"

A special issue of Designs (ISSN 2411-9660).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ana M. T. Martins
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Beira Interior, Calçada Fonte do Lameiro, 6200-001 Covilhã. Portugal
Lab2PT-Landscapes, Heritage and Territory Laboratory, University of Minho, Portugal
Interests: architectural and urban rehabilitation; built environment; architectural history; architectural theory; architectural heritage; Cistercian architecture; monastic buildings

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Built heritage is a major cultural asset. It refers to all aspects of man-made environments such as houses, places of worship, commercial and office buildings, monuments and other places of historical significance. Built heritage helps to define a sense of place and identity for communities. It is not only about monuments of exceptional value, but it also includes modest vernacular buildings and popular architectures that represent other equally important historical, social, and cultural values. According to the Davos Declaration (2018), the building culture encompasses existing buildings, monuments, and other elements of cultural heritage, as well as the design and construction of contemporary buildings, infrastructures, public spaces, and landscapes. The actual technical requirements are not always compatible with older buildings. Regular maintenance of these buildings may include preservation, rehabilitation, restoration, reconstruction, refurbishment, adaptation, and interpretation of existing buildings and their environment.

This Special Issue will gather a wide range of perspectives and discussions on practical and theoretical aspects of contemporary architectural design and the rehabilitation of built heritage. The architectural, constructive, and technical possibilities that can be used in the rehabilitation of built heritage should also be approached.

The geographical scope of this Special Issue is global, comprising urban and rural contexts. We welcome both original research studies and literature reviews based on case studies as well as theoretical and methodological approaches regarding contemporary architectural design and the rehabilitation of built heritage. Submissions are encouraged on, but not limited to, the areas mentioned keywords listed.

Prof. Dr. Ana M. T. Martins
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Designs is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Adaptive re-use
  • Architectural design
  • Architectural history
  • Architectural theory
  • Architectural rehabilitation
  • Built environment
  • Built heritage
  • Building culture
  • Building performance
  • Building rehabilitation
  • Construction engineering
  • Contemporary architectural design
  • Cultural heritage
  • Industrial buildings
  • Monastic buildings
  • Popular architecture
  • Vernacular architecture
  • Urban rehabilitation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Place-Making of Transit Towns in Qatar: The Case of Qatar National Museum-Souq Waqif Corridor
Designs 2021, 5(1), 18; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/designs5010018 - 09 Mar 2021
Viewed by 387
Abstract
Over the last two decades, Doha, the capital city of Qatar, has undergone rapid urbanization. The city has capitalized large-scale urban and infrastructural projects resulting in a loss of historical areas of heritage value to people. Recent construction of the Doha Metro is [...] Read more.
Over the last two decades, Doha, the capital city of Qatar, has undergone rapid urbanization. The city has capitalized large-scale urban and infrastructural projects resulting in a loss of historical areas of heritage value to people. Recent construction of the Doha Metro is opening avenues for place-making of transit towns through a framework envisioned by the need to shape compact, livable and sustainable neighborhoods and to mitigate the effects of urbanization on valuable historical heritage sites. Due to its historic significance, the Qatar National Museum (QNM)-Souq Waqif corridor is the case study selected for exploring and defining a framework for a contextualized place-making transit-oriented development (TOD) model. The research design is structured by reviewing the literature about TODs and the need for place-making model in Qatar, followed by collecting visual data from municipal authorities, through site visits, and site observations. The data are then analyzed to propose a novel masterplan, rooted in key urban design components of place-making. The insights will contribute to proposals for context-driven design strategies to enhance livability of the site and to extend its application to other potential transit hubs in metropolitan Doha and in the Middle East. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Colonial Architecture in Panama City. Analysis of the Heritage Value of Its Monastic Buildings
Designs 2020, 4(4), 57; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/designs4040057 - 21 Dec 2020
Viewed by 793
Abstract
The Historic District of Panama City was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1997 for representing an exceptional example of 17th century colonial urban planning in the Americas. This article focuses on the specific analysis of the deteriorated monastic typology, highlighting its [...] Read more.
The Historic District of Panama City was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1997 for representing an exceptional example of 17th century colonial urban planning in the Americas. This article focuses on the specific analysis of the deteriorated monastic typology, highlighting its historical role as an articulating piece of the original urban layout designed in 1673 after the transfer from Panamá Viejo to the current location and which continues today. Our methodology consisted of reviewing the different stages of each of these buildings, extracting common events, and identifying the examples of the greatest value loss, with the aim of enhancing and highlighting their historical footprint. This study includes approaches from urbanism, architectural history, and heritage preservation that allows us to discuss possible tools, either for protection or adaptative reuse, to avoid the deterioration of such important historical heritage. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Old Buildings’ Façades: Fieldwork and Discussion of Thermal Retrofitting Strategies in a Mediterranean Climate
Designs 2020, 4(4), 45; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/designs4040045 - 28 Oct 2020
Viewed by 810
Abstract
This work is within the scope of thermal retrofitting, applied to old buildings’ façades (built between 1700 and 1960) located in Mediterranean climates, such as Portugal. The aim is to increase the sustainability of existing buildings, by reducing their energy consumption needs, for [...] Read more.
This work is within the scope of thermal retrofitting, applied to old buildings’ façades (built between 1700 and 1960) located in Mediterranean climates, such as Portugal. The aim is to increase the sustainability of existing buildings, by reducing their energy consumption needs, for heating and cooling, and the corresponding gaseous emissions, while increasing their users’ comfort. Firstly, an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of several thermal insulation solutions for façades was carried out, supported in current literature. Then, a survey of real retrofitting scenarios and interviews with experts was completed, to allow the selection of the most adequate thermal insulation techniques. Finally, as a result of this study, the discussion of retrofitting strategies was carried out to support the designer’s decision process, based on a flowchart with complementary tables, discussing the best thermal retrofitting technique to be implemented on old buildings’ façades, case-by-case. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Architecture and Steel. Reflection and Analysis on the Use of Steel Structures (in Sight) as a Concept in the History of Architecture
Designs 2020, 4(3), 30; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/designs4030030 - 05 Aug 2020
Viewed by 875
Abstract
This is the first of two companion articles which aim to address the research on Architecture and Steel. In this article, some architectural projects are analyzed to show the potentiality to conjugate architectural conception and steel structures, as well as to show the [...] Read more.
This is the first of two companion articles which aim to address the research on Architecture and Steel. In this article, some architectural projects are analyzed to show the potentiality to conjugate architectural conception and steel structures, as well as to show the contribution and influence from architectural history. This article also aims to contribute to the reflection of the knowledge and legacy left to us by several architects throughout the history of architecture in using aesthetic, visual and structurally safe profiled steel structures in architectural conception. The presented analysis and reflection are based on the characteristics and influences of the Industrial Revolution and, mainly, the Modern Movement, where the first housing projects came up with this constructive system, combined with the “simplistic” ways of living in architecture, highlighting the relationship with the place, cultural, spatial and typological references, the structural systems and associated materiality. In view of the diversity of alternatives allowed by the use of steel “Skeletons”, modular and standardized, combined with a huge variety of existing materials and constructive complexity, well combined and interconnected, it is possible to obtain a final product whose characteristics seduce by their beauty and elegance. Moreover, the practical and functional comfort which allows the safeguarding of the architectural integration of such product, with the necessary serenity in space and nature, in full environmental integration, is also emphasized. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Architecture and Steel Prototype in Steel Structure with Equal Angles Steel Profiles, in Greek cross Shape, Applied in an Architectural Project
Designs 2020, 4(3), 24; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/designs4030024 - 28 Jul 2020
Viewed by 813
Abstract
This is the second of two companion articles which aim to address the research on architecture and steel. In the first article, some architectural projects were analyzed to show the potentiality to conjugate architectural conception and steel structures (in sight), as well as [...] Read more.
This is the second of two companion articles which aim to address the research on architecture and steel. In the first article, some architectural projects were analyzed to show the potentiality to conjugate architectural conception and steel structures (in sight), as well as to show the contribution and influence from architectural history. As a result of the previous work, this second article discusses the development of an innovative prototype in steel structure, which constitutes a modular system applied for a single-family housing. In this prototype, steel is part of the design concept, not only as a structural element, but also as an aesthetic element. The needs of contemporary “living” are reinterpreted, considering all the changes and cultural influences due to globalization, compared with the living in Portuguese popular architecture, with its simplistic character and minimal spaces, and referring to a place. The proposed modular system, which is applied repeatedly, shows a huge potential for reorganizing, in a short period of time, urban areas with housing shortages in cases of emergency, while respecting population needs and providing construction quality. This Prototype Model, which combines the architectural concept with the lightweight character of steel structures, aims to provide an “other” way of “living”. It transmits “harmony” both in the experience of the interior space and in its relationship with the outer space, respecting the cultural references. In this study, the prototype is applied to popular Portuguese schist architecture, combining the basic structuring idea and the way how the project develops for the application of the conceptual and constructive process, thus relating two periods of architecture. Full article
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