Special Issue "Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mehdi Mirsaeidi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA
Interests: sarcoidosis; nontuberculous mycobacteria; bronchial epithelial cells; ex-vivo lung model; animal model of pulmonary diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Parvaneh Baghaei Shiva
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA
Interests: mycobacterial diseases (TB and non-tuberculous mycobacterial disease); HIV; diabetes; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem, in spite of availability of drugs to cure TB as of a few decades ago. Some of the global issues in fighting TB are lack of appropriate diagnostic tools in high incidence countries, increasing incidence of drug-resistant TB due to misusing anti-TB medications, and lack of appropriate Direct Observed Therapy (DOT). The laboratory is an essential part of diagnosis, which should be able to perform mycobacterial culture and molecular methods to differentiate non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, it would be useful for screening of other diseases like diabetes and HIV.

The problem of drug-resistant TB is growing worldwide. It has significant impact on patients and their family, and public health systems. To combat this relatively new threat, improving TB observed therapy methods, early detection of high-risk groups of drug-resistant TB and enhancement of national TB programs with prevention strategies and treatment protocols are considered crucial.

The primary goal of this Special Issue is to build a platform to exchange experience, knowledge between epidemiologists, clinician-scientists, laboratory-scientists, and all related health professionals.

We are interested in patient-oriented and biologic-centered papers with solid clinical data that are generalizable in the field of TB.

Topics that will be considered for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Current situation of drug-resistant TB in national and international levels
  • New diagnostic tools, particularly point of care methods
  • Frequency of NTM among TB subjects and its impact on TB outcome
  • Tele-medicine and TB
  • Potential role of biologic agents in TB treatment
  • TB vaccine
  • Current situation of diabetes in TB patients in national levels
  • Current situation of HIV in TB patients in national levels

Dr. Mehdi Mirsaeidi
Dr. Parvaneh Baghaei Shiva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  •  Drug-resistant TB
  •  NTM
  •  HIV
  •  Diabetes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Communication
Feasibility of Direct Sputum Molecular Testing for Drug Resistance as Part of Tuberculosis Clinical Trials Eligibility Screening
Diagnostics 2019, 9(2), 56; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/diagnostics9020056 - 30 May 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1988
Abstract
A rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is critical for early initiation of effective therapy. Molecular testing with line probe assays (MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl) on culture isolates has been available for some time and significantly reduces the time to diagnosis [...] Read more.
A rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is critical for early initiation of effective therapy. Molecular testing with line probe assays (MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl) on culture isolates has been available for some time and significantly reduces the time to diagnosis of drug resistance. However, routine use of this test directly on sputum is less common. As part of enrollment screening procedures for tuberculosis clinical trials conducted in Hanoi, Vietnam, we evaluated the feasibility and performance of line probe assay (LPA) testing directly on sputum samples from 315 participants with no prior history of TB treatment. Test performance characteristics for the detection of rifampin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) drug resistance as compared to culture-based drug susceptibility testing (DST) reference standard were calculated. LPA demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of drug resistance. Scaling up molecular testing on sputum as part of time-sensitive clinical trial screening procedures in high TB burden settings is feasible and will reduce both time to initiation of appropriate therapy and the risk of late exclusions due to microbiologic ineligibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis)

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Challenges and Progress with Diagnosing Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Diagnostics 2018, 8(4), 78; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/diagnostics8040078 - 23 Nov 2018
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2994
Abstract
Case finding and the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) are key activities to reach the World Health Organization’s End TB targets by 2030. This paper focuses on the diagnosis of pulmonary TB (PTB) in low- and middle-income countries. Sputum smear microscopy, despite its many [...] Read more.
Case finding and the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) are key activities to reach the World Health Organization’s End TB targets by 2030. This paper focuses on the diagnosis of pulmonary TB (PTB) in low- and middle-income countries. Sputum smear microscopy, despite its many limitations, remains the primary diagnostic tool in peripheral health facilities; however, this is being replaced by molecular diagnostic techniques, particularly Xpert MTB/RIF, which allows a bacteriologically confirmed diagnosis of TB along with information about whether or not the organism is resistant to rifampicin within two hours. Other useful diagnostic tools at peripheral facilities include chest radiography, urine lipoarabinomannan (TB-LAM) in HIV-infected patients with advanced immunodeficiency, and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (TB-LAMP) test which may be superior to smear microscopy. National Reference Laboratories work at a higher level, largely performing culture and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing which is complemented by genotypic methods such as line probe assays for detecting resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, and second-line drugs. Tuberculin skin testing, interferon gamma release assays, and commercial serological tests are not recommended for the diagnosis of active TB. Linking diagnosis to treatment and care is often poor, and this aspect of TB management needs far more attention than it currently receives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis)
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