Special Issue "The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases"

A special issue of Diseases (ISSN 2079-9721).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Marwan El Ghoch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Beirut Arab University, P.O. Box 11-5020 Riad El Solh, Beirut 11072809, Lebanon
Interests: clinical nutrition; obesity; sarcopenic obesity; type 2 diabetes; eating disorders; weight-related diseases; body composition; weight cycling; physical activity; energy expenditure
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Agnes Ayton
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Honorary Senior Lecturer, University of Oxford, Consultant Psychiatrist, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom
Interests: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, obesity; metabolic syndrome; type 2 diabetes; eating disorders; psychiatry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diseases is launching a Special Issue entitled “The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases”. Diseases is an international, peer-reviewed, open access, multidisciplinary journal which focuses on the latest and most outstanding research on diseases and conditions, published quarterly online by MDPI. The first issue was released in 2013.

Hippocrates said “Let food be thy medicine, and let medicine be thy food” and since that time, there has been a great and growing interest in studying the potential link between nutrition and diseases, mainly under two disciplines, “Nutritional Epidemiology” and “Lifestyle Medicine”. To date, a wide spectrum of results have confirmed this link; however, many of those need to be interpreted with caution, before jumping to conclusions in proposing certain nutrients as preventative and therapeutic strategies for diseases. This is because many of these findings derive from cross-sectional studies that indicate only simple associations between a certain nutrient and specific a disease and do not provide solid information regarding any causal relationships between the two conditions.

This Special Issue will provide a platform for the presentation of recent advances in knowledge on the “real” relationship between nutrition and diseases, coming from diverse scientific disciplines.

Prof. Dr. Marwan El Ghoch
Dr. Agnes Ayton
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diseases is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cardiovascular diseases
  • diabetes
  • obesity
  • cancer dyslipidemia
  • clinical nutrition
  • weight–related morbidities
  • sarcopenia
  • eating disorders
  • gut microbiota
  • anorexia and bulimia nervosa
  • binge eating disorder
  • depression

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Nutrition Literacy among Adolescents and Its Association with Eating Habits and BMI in Tripoli, Lebanon
Diseases 2021, 9(2), 25; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/diseases9020025 - 29 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 964
Abstract
(1) Background: Adolescence is a period of increased autonomy and independent decision making; it determines health behaviors that can persist into the future. Individual factors like food choices and unhealthy lifestyle have an essential role in the development and prevention of obesity among [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Adolescence is a period of increased autonomy and independent decision making; it determines health behaviors that can persist into the future. Individual factors like food choices and unhealthy lifestyle have an essential role in the development and prevention of obesity among adolescents and are associated with the nutrition literacy of parents and other adults. While the association of parents’ nutrition literacy with adolescent BMI has been addressed, there is still a scarcity of studies that examine the effect of adolescents’ nutrition literacy on their eating habits and body mass index (BMI) status. (2) Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted that included 189 adolescents (68 with overweight and obesity and 121 with normal weight) aged between 14–19 years from four private schools in Tripoli, Lebanon. A self-administered questionnaire that included the Nutrition Literacy Assessment Instrument (NLAI) and the Adolescent Food Habits Checklist (AFHC) was used. Anthropometrics were measured using standardized procedures. The association between nutrition literacy, food habits and BMI was assessed using a chi squared test for independence and Poisson regression analysis where suitable. (3) Results: Results indicated no association between all five components of nutrition literacy and body mass index categories. Furthermore, there was no association between the Adolescent Food Habits Checklist and overweight or obese BMI status (RR = 0.947, 95%CI: 0.629–1.426) (p = 0.796). No association was observed between nutrition literacy and food habits, except for an inverse association with macronutrients literacy. (4) Conclusions: In conclusion, the study indicated that there was no association between the components of nutrition literacy with body mass index or with food habits, except for macronutrient literacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases)

Review

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Review
Overview of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Clinical Features, Treatment, and Nutritional Aspects
Diseases 2021, 9(4), 66; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/diseases9040066 - 23 Sep 2021
Viewed by 687
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a 0.5–1 µm wide, 2–4 µm long, short helical, S-shaped Gram-negative microorganism. It is mostly found in the pyloric region of the stomach and causes chronic gastric infection. It is estimated that these bacteria infect more [...] Read more.
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a 0.5–1 µm wide, 2–4 µm long, short helical, S-shaped Gram-negative microorganism. It is mostly found in the pyloric region of the stomach and causes chronic gastric infection. It is estimated that these bacteria infect more than half of the world’s population. The mode of transmission and infection of H. pylori is still not known exactly, but the faecal–oral and oral–oral routes via water or food consumption are thought to be a very common cause. In the last three decades, research interest has increased regarding the pathogenicity, microbial activity, genetic predisposition, and clinical treatments to understand the severity of gastric atrophy and gastric cancer caused by H. pylori. Studies have suggested a relationship between H. pylori infection and malabsorption of essential micronutrients, and noted that H. pylori infection may affect the prevalence of malnutrition in some risk groups. On the other hand, dietary factors may play a considerably important role in H. pylori infection, and it has been reported that an adequate and balanced diet, especially high fruit and vegetable consumption and low processed salty food consumption, has a protective effect against the outcomes of H. pylori infection. The present review provides an overview of all aspects of H. pylori infection, such as clinical features, treatment, and nutrition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases)
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Review
Fertility and Reproduction after Recovery from Anorexia Nervosa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Long-Term Follow-Up Studies
Diseases 2020, 8(4), 46; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/diseases8040046 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1731
Abstract
Reproductive health is compromised during anorexia nervosa (AN). However, it is still unclear whether this medical complication is reversible after recovery from AN. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of the major reproductive health outcomes in females after [...] Read more.
Reproductive health is compromised during anorexia nervosa (AN). However, it is still unclear whether this medical complication is reversible after recovery from AN. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of the major reproductive health outcomes in females after recovery from AN. The review was conducted in adherence to preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Data were collated using meta-analysis and a narrative approach. Of the 1186 articles retrieved, five studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. These studies monitored weight-restored females who had recovered from AN for a follow-up period of between six and 18 years. Their narrative analysis revealed that appropriate treatment of AN leads to the normalization of reproductive function, especially in terms of fertility, pregnancy, and childbirth rates. The meta-analysis confirmed this finding, where the pooled odds of childbirth rates between the AN group and the general population was not statistically significant (OR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.43–1.29, p = 0.41). We conclude that if patients undergo appropriate eating-disorder treatment and weight restoration, it appears to be unlikely that reproductive health is affected by AN. However, since this finding is derived from only a few studies, it requires replication and confirmation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship between Nutrition and Diseases)
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