Special Issue "Neuroendocrine, Endocrine and Metabolic Triggers of Impaired Female Reproduction"

A special issue of Endocrines (ISSN 2673-396X). This special issue belongs to the section "Female Reproductive System and Pregnancy Endocrinology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Alessandro Genazzani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecological Endocrinology Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
Interests: neuroendocrine/endocrine control of reproduction; hypothalamic dysfunctions; PCOS; obesity; hyperinsulinism; peri and postmenopausal disturbances

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

When dealing with abnormal menstrual occurrence or with inability to conceive, many issues can be taken in consideration. Stress, impaired metabolism, PCOS, ovarian failure, endocrine diseases, excess physical activity, or psychodynamic aspects can be effective in negatively modulating the reproductive axis, resulting in a defective reproductive ability.

This Special Issue aims to review the current knowledge and clinical experience of the many situations that have an impact on female reproductive function from adolescence to premenopause, from physiopathology to putative treatment options.

Prof. Dr. Alessandro Genazzani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Endocrines is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Neuroendocrinology 
  • NPY, kisspeptin, opioids, neuropeptides 
  • Stress 
  • PCOS 
  • Insulin resistance 
  • Endocrine diseases 
  • Ovarian failure

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Review
Neuroendocrine Changes during Menopausal Transition
Endocrines 2021, 2(4), 405-416; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2040036 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 259
Abstract
Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstrual cycles following the loss of ovarian follicular activity. Quality of life of postmenopausal woman is the result of a series of psychobiological transformations, that see in the reduction of sex hormones and steroids the etiopathogenetic determinant [...] Read more.
Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstrual cycles following the loss of ovarian follicular activity. Quality of life of postmenopausal woman is the result of a series of psychobiological transformations, that see in the reduction of sex hormones and steroids the etiopathogenetic determinant moment. Symptoms of menopause range from somatic side such as metabolic changes, increased cardiovascular disease, irregular vaginal bleeding, urogenital symptoms, vaginal dryness, osteoporosis and risk of bones fractures to changes of central nervous system as vasomotor symptoms, sleep disruption, mood changes, migraine, sexual dysfunctions. It is fundamental to know the mechanisms underlying changes in the central nervous system during menopause, related to hypoestrogenism, to be able to create appropriate target therapy for patients, improving their quality of life. In fact, the central nervous system is now one of the major targets of sex steroids that cannot be achieved disregard when dealing with the problem of choice of a particular type of MHT. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Thyroid, Adrenal, PRL Impairments and Ovarian Function
Endocrines 2021, 2(3), 212-225; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2030021 - 27 Jul 2021
Viewed by 460
Abstract
Endocrine axes (prolactin, thyroid and adrenal axes) directly and indirectly modulate and drive human female central functions, mainly behavior and reproduction. Though having distinct abilities, they greatly act both at peripheral as well as at neuroendocrine levels, so as to participate in the [...] Read more.
Endocrine axes (prolactin, thyroid and adrenal axes) directly and indirectly modulate and drive human female central functions, mainly behavior and reproduction. Though having distinct abilities, they greatly act both at peripheral as well as at neuroendocrine levels, so as to participate in the control of reproduction. Any event that changes these balanced activities produces specific peripheral signals that induce abnormal functions centrally, thus triggering menstrual disorders such as oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea. It is clear that the knowledge of the relationships that exist between the different endocrine axes becomes essential for the choice of therapeutical approach. This review aims to focus on the main aspects of the physiopathology of the endocrine diseases that might be at the basis of that interference with female reproductive capacity. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea: A Stress-Based Disease
Endocrines 2021, 2(3), 203-211; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2030020 - 24 Jul 2021
Viewed by 654
Abstract
The aim of the study is to present the problem of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, taking into account any disease and treatment, diagnosis, and consequences of this disease. We searched PubMed (MEDLINE) and included 38 original and review articles concerning functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. Functional [...] Read more.
The aim of the study is to present the problem of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, taking into account any disease and treatment, diagnosis, and consequences of this disease. We searched PubMed (MEDLINE) and included 38 original and review articles concerning functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea is the most common cause of secondary amenorrhea in women of childbearing age. It is a reversible disorder caused by stress related to weight loss, excessive exercise and/or traumatic mental experiences. The basis of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea is hormonal, based on impaired pulsatile GnRH secretion in the hypothalamus, then decreased secretion of gonadotropins, and, consequently, impaired hormonal function of the ovaries. This disorder leads to hypoestrogenism, manifested by a disturbance of the menstrual cycle in the form of amenorrhea, leading to anovulation. Prolonged state of hypoestrogenism can be very detrimental to general health, leading to many harmful short- and long-term consequences. Treatment of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea should be started as soon as possible, and it should primarily involve lifestyle modification. Only then should pharmacological treatment be applied. Importantly, treatment is most often long-term, but it results in recovery for the majority of patients. Effective therapy, based on multidirectional action, can protect patients from numerous negative impacts on fertility, cardiovascular system and bone health, as well as reducing mental morbidity. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Sex Differences in Renal Function: Participation of Gonadal Hormones and Prolactin
Endocrines 2021, 2(3), 185-202; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/endocrines2030019 - 05 Jul 2021
Viewed by 930
Abstract
Kidney pathophysiology is influenced by gender. Evidence suggests that kidney damage is more severe in males than in females and that sexual hormones contribute to this. Elevated prolactin concentration is common in renal impairment patients and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. However, [...] Read more.
Kidney pathophysiology is influenced by gender. Evidence suggests that kidney damage is more severe in males than in females and that sexual hormones contribute to this. Elevated prolactin concentration is common in renal impairment patients and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. However, PRL is involved in the osmoregulatory process and promotes endothelial proliferation, dilatation, and permeability in blood vessels. Several proteinases cleavage its structure, forming vasoinhibins. These fragments have antagonistic PRL effects on endothelium and might be associated with renal endothelial dysfunction, but its role in the kidneys has not been enough investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to describe the influence of sexual dimorphism and gonadal hormones on kidney damage, emphasizing the role of the hormone prolactin and its cleavage products, the vasoinhibins. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop