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Special Issue "Developments in Oil and Gas Engineering"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Geo-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alireza Bahadori
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Science & Engineering, Southern Cross University, P.O. Box 157, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia
Interests: renewable energy; sustainable energy; environmental engineering; oil and gas engineering; resource recovery and utilization; gasification, pyrolysis; air pollution control; waste management; waste treatment; waste to energy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I cordially invite you to contribute your original research articles, review articles, or case studies to this Special Issue on developments in oil and gas production and processing.

In petroleum fields, hydrocarbon production is often constrained by oil and gas reservoir conditions, deliverability of the pipeline network, the fluid-handling capacity of facilities, safety and economic considerations, or a combination of these considerations. The task of oil and gas engineers is to devise the best engineering strategies to achieve certain operational goals.

These targets can vary from field to field and with time. Typically, one may wish to maximize oil and gas production rates or minimize production costs. This Special Issue aims to provide high-quality papers addressing various oil and gas engineering issues that ease and automate the decision-making of oil and gas production and processing for certain operations. In this volume, high-quality papers related to the major components (the objective, control variables, and constraints) of oil and gas production and processing optimization problems are presented.

I look forward to receiving your high-quality manuscripts for this Special Issue. Thank you very much.

Dr. Alireza Bahadori
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oil and gas production
  • oil and gas processing and optimization
  • modeling oil and gas reservoirs, production and processing systems
  • oil and gas transmission
  • oil and gas reservoir engineering
  • oil and gas refining
  • petrochemical plants

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
Studies on the Efficiency of the Impact of Paraffin Inhibitors on Lowering the WAT Temperature and Reducing the Amount of Paraffin Deposit
Energies 2020, 13(18), 4653; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/en13184653 - 07 Sep 2020
Viewed by 479
Abstract
This paper discusses the issues of the impact of pressure and temperature on the precipitation of paraffin deposits from reservoir fluids in the presence of previously prepared paraffin inhibitors. Using a properly modified PVT apparatus, the temperature of the beginning of paraffin precipitation [...] Read more.
This paper discusses the issues of the impact of pressure and temperature on the precipitation of paraffin deposits from reservoir fluids in the presence of previously prepared paraffin inhibitors. Using a properly modified PVT apparatus, the temperature of the beginning of paraffin precipitation (wax appearance temperature—WAT) has been determined, below which the solid paraffin phase was captured on a specialized filter in various temperatures. Based on the conducted experiments, a boundary has been established separating the paraffin area (the presence of paraffins as their solid phase) from an area without paraffin. Measurements of the amount of paraffin using the filter allowed the determination of the WPC (wax precipitation curve), due to which additional data is provided regarding the amount of precipitated paraffin deposit below the WAT. The developed methodology enables to conduct the measurements within a wide range of pressures using the sample saturated with reservoir gas, which can test the crude oil sample that corresponds to the actual production conditions. Most known research methods do not allow such preparation of a sample and conducting the measurements under pressurized conditions; therefore, the produced results are subject to errors. The paper describes also the studies of efficiency and differences in the action of various paraffin inhibitors. Based on the performed research, a comparison was made involving the action of agents under the pressureless conditions of dead oil and pressurized crude oil samples saturated with gas. The performed studies allowed the determination of equilibrium conditions (in a pressure–temperature system), under which deposition of the solid paraffin phase occurs during the use of three various inhibitors. Based on the performed experiments, an area with a paraffin hazard was determined, along with an area without paraffins. Due to the separation of the precipitated solid paraffin phase, an increase in the mass of the paraffin deposit associated with a temperature drop was determined (wax precipitation curve), as well as the impact of the applied inhibitors on its course. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Oil and Gas Engineering)
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Article
Influence of Sulfate Ions on the Combined Application of Modified Water and Polymer Flooding—Rheology and Oil Recovery
Energies 2020, 13(9), 2356; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/en13092356 - 08 May 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 718
Abstract
Oil recovery using modified/smart water technology can be maximized by optimizing the composition of the injected water. Brine optimization is also believed to improve polymer flooding performance. This chapter assesses and defines the potential impact of combining low-salt-modified water with polymer flooding, based [...] Read more.
Oil recovery using modified/smart water technology can be maximized by optimizing the composition of the injected water. Brine optimization is also believed to improve polymer flooding performance. This chapter assesses and defines the potential impact of combining low-salt-modified water with polymer flooding, based on the presence of sulfate in the injection water. Hence, we evaluated the influence of sodium sulfate on (1) polymer viscoelasticity, under the assumption that the phenomena exists, and (2) oil recovery and pressure response. Mainly, a comprehensive rheological evaluation and two-phase core flood experiments are the focus of this work. Composition of injection brine is optimized after having synthetic seawater as a base brine. Core-flood experiments were performed in a secondary, tertiary and a sort of post-tertiary (quaternary) mode to evaluate the feasibility of applying both processes (modified water and polymer flood). Obtained data was subsequently cross-analyzed and as an overall observation, sodium sulfate helped with improving polymer viscosity compared to sodium chloride or divalent cation presence. Moreover, optimized modified water, with the higher amount of sulfate ions, showed an additional oil recovery in both secondary and tertiary mode of about 5.0%. Additionally, polymer injection in tertiary mode, after modified-water injection, showed significant additional oil recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Oil and Gas Engineering)
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Article
Calibration of the Interaction Parameters between the Proppant and Fracture Wall and the Effects of These Parameters on Proppant Distribution
Energies 2020, 13(8), 2099; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/en13082099 - 23 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 677
Abstract
Saltation and reputation (creep) dominate proppant transport rather than suspension during slickwater fracturing, due to the low sand-carrying capacity of the slickwater. Thus, the interaction parameters between proppants and fracture walls, which affect saltation and reputation, play a more critical role in proppant [...] Read more.
Saltation and reputation (creep) dominate proppant transport rather than suspension during slickwater fracturing, due to the low sand-carrying capacity of the slickwater. Thus, the interaction parameters between proppants and fracture walls, which affect saltation and reputation, play a more critical role in proppant transport. In this paper, a calibration method for the interaction parameters between proppants and walls is built. A three-dimensional coupled computational fluid dynamics–discrete element method (CFD–DEM) model is established to study the effects of the interaction parameters on proppant migration, considering the wall roughness and unevenly distributed diameters of proppants. The simulation results show that a lower static friction coefficient and rolling friction coefficient can result in a smaller equilibrium height of the sand bank and a smaller build angle and drawdown angle, which is beneficial for carrying the proppant to the distal end of the fracture. The wall roughness and the unevenly distributed diameter of the proppants increase the collision between proppant and proppant or the wall, whereas the interactions have little impact on the sandbank morphology, slightly increasing the equilibrium height of the sandbank. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Oil and Gas Engineering)
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Article
Recipe of Lightweight Slurry with High Early Strength of the Resultant Cement Sheath
Energies 2020, 13(7), 1583; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/en13071583 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 771
Abstract
Admixtures of mineral or waste filling materials are used to reduce slurry density. However, the sheath made of lightweight cement slurry has low mechanical performance at the initial bonding time. The required strength is achieved later. This is the main problem when evaluating [...] Read more.
Admixtures of mineral or waste filling materials are used to reduce slurry density. However, the sheath made of lightweight cement slurry has low mechanical performance at the initial bonding time. The required strength is achieved later. This is the main problem when evaluating the cement bond logging. The waiting time for geophysical measurements after injecting and bonding of cement is nowadays increasingly shortened. This is forced by economic factors. Too early geophysical measurements may result in obtaining a false indication of the cement bond logging. The lack of cement or partial bonding, despite the presence of slurry in the annular space is then found. The slurry developed by the author achieves high compressive strength after a short bonding time. Reducing the amount of water in the slurry resulted in a lowered filtration value. This is important in preventing gas migration after the cementing. The designed slurry also reaches the value of 3.5 MPa in a short time. This allows for an earlier commencement of a well drilling. The use of said slurry improves the effectiveness of the well sealing and makes it possible to obtain a reliable knowledge of the bond logging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Oil and Gas Engineering)
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Article
Analysis of Pressure and Production Transient Characteristics of Composite Reservoir with Moving Boundary
Energies 2020, 13(1), 34; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/en13010034 - 19 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 559
Abstract
The mathematical model of composite reservoir has been widely used in well test analysis. In the process of oil recovery, due to the injection or replacement of the displacement agent, the model boundary can be moved. At present, the mathematical model of a [...] Read more.
The mathematical model of composite reservoir has been widely used in well test analysis. In the process of oil recovery, due to the injection or replacement of the displacement agent, the model boundary can be moved. At present, the mathematical model of a composite reservoir with a moving boundary is less frequently studied and cannot meet industrial demand. In this paper, a mathematical model of a composite reservoir with a moving boundary is developed, with consideration of wellbore storage and skin effects. The characteristics of pressure transient in moving boundary composite reservoir are studied, and the influences of parameters, such as initial boundary radius, moving boundary velocity, skin factor, wellbore storage coefficient, diffusion coefficient ratio, and mobility ratio on pressure and production, are analyzed. The moving boundary effects are noticeable mainly in the middle and late production stages. The proposed model provides a novel theoretical basis for well test analysis in these types of reservoirs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Oil and Gas Engineering)
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Article
Role of Shearing Dispersion and Stripping in Wax Deposition in Crude Oil Pipelines
Energies 2019, 12(22), 4325; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/en12224325 - 13 Nov 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 617
Abstract
Wax deposition during crude oil transmission can cause a series of negative effects and lead to problems associated with pipeline safety. A considerable number of previous works have investigated the wax deposition mechanism, inhibition technology, and remediation methods. However, studies on the shearing [...] Read more.
Wax deposition during crude oil transmission can cause a series of negative effects and lead to problems associated with pipeline safety. A considerable number of previous works have investigated the wax deposition mechanism, inhibition technology, and remediation methods. However, studies on the shearing mechanism of wax deposition have focused largely on the characterization of this phenomena. The role of the shearing mechanism on wax deposition has not been completely clarified. This mechanism can be divided into the shearing dispersion effect caused by radial migration of wax particles and the shearing stripping effect caused by hydrodynamic scouring. From the perspective of energy analysis, a novel wax deposition model was proposed that considered the flow parameters of waxy crude oil in pipelines instead of its rheological parameters. Considering the two effects of shearing dispersion and shearing stripping coexist, with either one of them being the dominant mechanism, a shearing dispersion flux model and a shearing stripping model were established. Furthermore, a quantitative method to distinguish between the roles of shearing dispersion and shearing stripping in wax deposition was developed. The results indicated that the shearing mechanism can contribute an average of approximately 10% and a maximum of nearly 30% to the wax deposition process. With an increase in the oil flow rate, the effect of the shearing mechanism on wax deposition is enhanced, and its contribution was demonstrated to be negative; shear stripping was observed to be the dominant mechanism. A critical flow rate was observed when the dominant effect changes. When the oil flow rate is lower than the critical flow rate, the shearing dispersion effect is the dominant effect; its contribution rate increases with an increase in the oil flow temperature. When the oil flow rate is higher than the critical flow rate, the shearing stripping effect is the dominant effect; its contribution rate increases with an increase in the oil flow temperature. This understanding can be used to design operational parameters of the actual crude oil pipelines and address the potential flow assurance problems. The results of this study are of great significance for understanding the wax deposition theory of crude oil and accelerating the development of petroleum industry pipelines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Oil and Gas Engineering)
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Article
Reaction Kinetics and Coreflooding Study of High-Temperature Carbonate Reservoir Stimulation Using GLDA in Seawater
Energies 2019, 12(18), 3407; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/en12183407 - 04 Sep 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 974
Abstract
Well stimulation using hydrochloric acid (HCl) is a common practice in carbonate reservoirs to overcome formation damage in the near wellbore area. Using HCl for matrix acidizing has many limitations at high-temperature (HT) conditions, such as tubulars corrosion and face dissolution due to [...] Read more.
Well stimulation using hydrochloric acid (HCl) is a common practice in carbonate reservoirs to overcome formation damage in the near wellbore area. Using HCl for matrix acidizing has many limitations at high-temperature (HT) conditions, such as tubulars corrosion and face dissolution due to the fast reaction rate. Chelating agents, such as L-glutamic acid-N,N-diacetic acid (GLDA), are alternatives to HCl to overcome these problems. We studied the effect of diluting GLDA in seawater on the reaction kinetics with carbonate rocks under HT conditions at low pH (3.8). Results of the reaction of carbonate at 1000 psi and 150, 200, and 250 °F with GLDA prepared in both fresh and seawater, GLDA/DI and GLDA/SW, respectively, are presented. The reaction kinetics experiments were carried out in HT rotating disk apparatus (RDA) at rotational speeds ranging from 500 to 2000 revolutions per minute (RPM) at a fixed temperature. Indiana limestone and Austin chalk were used to studying the effect of rock facies on the reaction of GLDA with rock samples. In both GLDA/DI and GLDA/SW, the reaction regime of 20 wt% GLDA (3.8 pH) with Indiana limestone was mass transfer limited. The reaction rate and diffusion coefficient were highly dependent on the temperature. For Austin chalk, at 200 °F and 1000 psi the diffusion coefficient of GLDA/SW is an order of magnitude of its value with Indiana limestone using the same fluid. Diffusion coefficients were used to estimate the optimum injection rate for stimulating HT carbonate formation and compared with coreflooding results. The data presented in this paper will support the numerical simulation of the acid flow in carbonate reservoirs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Oil and Gas Engineering)
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