Special Issue "Short Packet Communications for 5G and Beyond"

A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300). This special issue belongs to the section "Information Theory, Probability and Statistics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mahyar Shirvanimoghaddam
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for IoT and Telecommunications, School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney, Darlington, NSW 2006, Australia
Interests: Information and Coding Theory; Communication Theory; Wireless Communications; Internet of Things; Rateless Codes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the emergence of Internet of Things applications and services and development of ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC) and massive machine-type communications (mMTC) in the 5th generation of mobile standards, short-packet communication has gained enormous attention in recent years. In many mMTC scenarios, a small amount of data should be exchanged between the transmitter and receiver, which necessitates the use of short packets to maximize bandwidth efficiency. On the other hand, short packet communication can significantly reduce the latency which is favorable for URLLC applications. The purpose of this Special Issue is to shed light on the novel approaches for short packet communications. Researchers are highly encouraged to submit their recent findings in the field of information and coding theory and wireless communications. Topics of submission include but are not limited to the following:

Physical Layer Techniques for Short Packet Communications

  • Fundamental information-theoretic limits of short packet communications
  • Diversity techniques for short packet communications
  • Physical-layer security for short packet communications
  • Energy efficiency analysis and optimization for short packet communications
  • Spectrum utilization and optimization for short packet communications
  • Channel coding for short packet communications
  • Modulation and signal design for short packet communications

MAC, application and other upper layer technologies for Short Packet Communications

  • Multi-layer networks for short packet communications
  • Information centralized networking (ICN) for short packet communications
  • Queuing theory and optimization for short packet communications
  • Retransmission techniques and HARQ for short packet communications
  • Cross layer optimization for short packet communications
  • AI-enabled resource allocation for short packet communications
  • Access techniques for short packet communications
  • NOMA and grant-free techniques for short packet communications
Information security technologies for short packet communications
  • Artificial intelligence-enabled security technologies for short packet communications
  • Fingerprint classification/identification for short packet communications
  • Endogenous security technologies for short packet communications
  • Identity authentication for short packet communications

Dr. Mahyar Shirvanimoghaddam
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • URLLC         
  • mMTC      
  • Grant-free access        
  • Channel coding
  • Resource allocation       
  • Short packet communication     
  • PHY        
  • MAC       
  • 5G        
  • B5G
  • 6G

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Low-Latency Short-Packet Transmission over a Large Spatial Scale
Entropy 2021, 23(7), 916; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/e23070916 - 19 Jul 2021
Viewed by 687
Abstract
Short-packet transmission has attracted considerable attention due to its potential to achieve ultralow latency in automated driving, telesurgery, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), and other applications emerging in the coming era of the Six-Generation (6G) wireless networks. In 6G systems, a paradigm-shifting [...] Read more.
Short-packet transmission has attracted considerable attention due to its potential to achieve ultralow latency in automated driving, telesurgery, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), and other applications emerging in the coming era of the Six-Generation (6G) wireless networks. In 6G systems, a paradigm-shifting infrastructure is anticipated to provide seamless coverage by integrating low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellite networks, which enable long-distance wireless relaying. However, how to efficiently transmit short packets over a sizeable spatial scale remains open. In this paper, we are interested in low-latency short-packet transmissions between two distant nodes, in which neither propagation delay, nor propagation loss can be ignored. Decode-and-forward (DF) relays can be deployed to regenerate packets reliably during their delivery over a long distance, thereby reducing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss. However, they also cause decoding delay in each hop, the sum of which may become large and cannot be ignored given the stringent latency constraints. This paper presents an optimal relay deployment to minimize the error probability while meeting both the latency and transmission power constraints. Based on an asymptotic analysis, a theoretical performance bound for distant short-packet transmission is also characterized by the optimal distance–latency–reliability tradeoff, which is expected to provide insights into designing integrated LEO satellite communications in 6G. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Short Packet Communications for 5G and Beyond)
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Article
Delay-Sensitive NOMA-HARQ for Short Packet Communications
Entropy 2021, 23(7), 880; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/e23070880 - 09 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 682
Abstract
This paper investigates the two-user uplink non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) paired with the hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) in the finite blocklength regime, where the target latency of each user is the priority. To limit the packet delivery delay and avoid packet queuing [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the two-user uplink non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) paired with the hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) in the finite blocklength regime, where the target latency of each user is the priority. To limit the packet delivery delay and avoid packet queuing of the users, we propose a novel NOMA-HARQ approach where the retransmission of each packet is served non-orthogonally with the new packet in the same time slot. We use a Markov model (MM) to analyze the dynamics of the uplink NOMA-HARQ with one retransmission and characterize the packet error rate (PER), throughput, and latency performance of each user. We also present numerical optimizations to find the optimal power ratios of each user. Numerical results show that the proposed scheme significantly outperforms the standard NOMA-HARQ in terms of packet delivery delay at the target PER. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Short Packet Communications for 5G and Beyond)
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Article
List Decoding of Arıkan’s PAC Codes
Entropy 2021, 23(7), 841; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/e23070841 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 678
Abstract
Polar coding gives rise to the first explicit family of codes that provably achieve capacity with efficient encoding and decoding for a wide range of channels. However, its performance at short blocklengths under standard successive cancellation decoding is far from optimal. A well-known [...] Read more.
Polar coding gives rise to the first explicit family of codes that provably achieve capacity with efficient encoding and decoding for a wide range of channels. However, its performance at short blocklengths under standard successive cancellation decoding is far from optimal. A well-known way to improve the performance of polar codes at short blocklengths is CRC precoding followed by successive-cancellation list decoding. This approach, along with various refinements thereof, has largely remained the state of the art in polar coding since it was introduced in 2011. Recently, Arıkan presented a new polar coding scheme, which he called polarization-adjusted convolutional (PAC) codes. At short blocklengths, such codes offer a dramatic improvement in performance as compared to CRC-aided list decoding of conventional polar codes. PAC codes are based primarily upon the following main ideas: replacing CRC codes with convolutional precoding (under appropriate rate profiling) and replacing list decoding by sequential decoding. One of our primary goals in this paper is to answer the following question: is sequential decoding essential for the superior performance of PAC codes? We show that similar performance can be achieved using list decoding when the list size L is moderately large (say, L128). List decoding has distinct advantages over sequential decoding in certain scenarios, such as low-SNR regimes or situations where the worst-case complexity/latency is the primary constraint. Another objective is to provide some insights into the remarkable performance of PAC codes. We first observe that both sequential decoding and list decoding of PAC codes closely match ML decoding thereof. We then estimate the number of low weight codewords in PAC codes, and use these estimates to approximate the union bound on their performance. These results indicate that PAC codes are superior to both polar codes and Reed–Muller codes. We also consider random time-varying convolutional precoding for PAC codes, and observe that this scheme achieves the same superior performance with constraint length as low as ν=2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Short Packet Communications for 5G and Beyond)
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