Special Issue "Quantum Collision Models"

A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300). This special issue belongs to the section "Quantum Information".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Francesco Ciccarello
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica - Emilio Segrè, University of Palermo, 90128 Palermo, Italy
2. NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, I-56127 Pisa, Italy
Interests: quantum optics; open quantum systems; waveguide QED; quantum correlations without entanglement; quantum information processing implementations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Open quantum systems (OQSs) are topical these days. Most notably, their study is essential within the very broad framework of quantum technologies whose full development is hindered by decoherence.

Being inherently difficult to study, OQS dynamics demand effective descriptions and models. In this respect, an emerging approach is to adopt quantum collision models (CMs), also known as repeated interactions schemes; the reservoir is simply described as a collection of smaller units with which the open system interacts one at a time.

First introduced decades ago for investigating weak measurements and micromaser dynamics and then reconsidered in the 2000s from a quantum information theory perspective, the last few years have seen a fast spread of CMs especially in research areas such as quantum non-Markovian dynamics, non-equilibrium quantum thermodynamics, quantum optics, and even gravitational decoherence.

Currently, the number of problems where a collisional approach finds application is growing. Natural questions include: To what extent are CMs a helpful tool? Can we envisage a CM-based approach for tackling potentially any OQS problem? Are there interesting applications of CMs yet unknown? In this spirit, the present Special Issue (the first fully dedicated to CMs to our knowledge) welcomes research papers where quantum CMs are effectively employed for investigating a physical phenomenon, possibly in new areas or when an advantage emerges over more conventional approaches.

Prof. Dr. Francesco Ciccarello
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Open quantum systems
  • Quantum thermodynamics
  • Quantum information
  • Quantum non-Markovianity
  • Non-equilibrium processes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Stochastic Collisional Quantum Thermometry
Entropy 2021, 23(12), 1634; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/e23121634 - 06 Dec 2021
Viewed by 241
Abstract
We extend collisional quantum thermometry schemes to allow for stochasticity in the waiting time between successive collisions. We establish that introducing randomness through a suitable waiting time distribution, the Weibull distribution, allows us to significantly extend the parameter range for which an advantage [...] Read more.
We extend collisional quantum thermometry schemes to allow for stochasticity in the waiting time between successive collisions. We establish that introducing randomness through a suitable waiting time distribution, the Weibull distribution, allows us to significantly extend the parameter range for which an advantage over the thermal Fisher information is attained. These results are explicitly demonstrated for dephasing interactions and also hold for partial swap interactions. Furthermore, we show that the optimal measurements can be performed locally, thus implying that genuine quantum correlations do not play a role in achieving this advantage. We explicitly confirm this by examining the correlation properties for the deterministic collisional model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Collision Models)
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Article
Battery Charging in Collision Models with Bayesian Risk Strategies
Entropy 2021, 23(12), 1627; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/e23121627 - 02 Dec 2021
Viewed by 191
Abstract
We constructed a collision model where measurements in the system, together with a Bayesian decision rule, are used to classify the incoming ancillas as having either high or low ergotropy (maximum extractable work). The former are allowed to leave, while the latter are [...] Read more.
We constructed a collision model where measurements in the system, together with a Bayesian decision rule, are used to classify the incoming ancillas as having either high or low ergotropy (maximum extractable work). The former are allowed to leave, while the latter are redirected for further processing, aimed at increasing their ergotropy further. The ancillas play the role of a quantum battery, and the collision model, therefore, implements a Maxwell demon. To make the process autonomous and with a well-defined limit cycle, the information collected by the demon is reset after each collision by means of a cold heat bath. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Collision Models)
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