Special Issue "Effect of Environmental Pollutants on Metabolic Defects"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (14 May 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Céline Aguer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institut du Savoir Montfort, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Interests: insulin resistance; skeletal muscle; myokines; fatty acid metabolism; mitochondrial function; oxidative stress; environmental pollutants; cytokines; physical activity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In times of environmental concern and activism, we are becoming more aware of the effects of our environment on our health. Due to the industrialization of our societies, we are constantly exposed to chemical pollutants that may contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancers, allergies, respiratory diseases, and metabolic diseases. At present, there is a growing global epidemic of diabesity, defined as the coexistence of both diabetes and obesity. Diabetes and obesity prevalence has nearly quadrupled and tripled in the past 40 years, respectively. While the diabesity epidemic is mainly attributed to excess caloric intake and lack of physical activity, the role of environmental chemicals should not be overlooked. There are clear trends between increased obesity and diabetes prevalence and exposure to chemicals. This Special Issue will highlight recent data on the link between exposure to environmental pollutants and the development of metabolic diseases. We invite experts in the field to submit their critical review or original articles to emphasize the role played by these chemicals on our metabolic health.

Dr. Céline Aguer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • metabolic syndrome
  • environmental chemicals
  • persistent organic pollutants
  • endocrine disruptors
  • adipogenesis
  • insulin resistance
  • beta-cell dysfunction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Prenatal Exposure to Persistent Organic Pollutants and Maternal Folic Acid Supplementation: Their Impact on Glucose Homeostasis in Male Rat Descendants
Environments 2021, 8(3), 24; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments8030024 - 22 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1019
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is associated with insulin resistance while folic acid (FA) may offer a protective effect. However, the paternal contribution to metabolic phenotypes in offspring is not well known yet. Hence, we investigated whether maternal exposure to POPs affects [...] Read more.
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is associated with insulin resistance while folic acid (FA) may offer a protective effect. However, the paternal contribution to metabolic phenotypes in offspring is not well known yet. Hence, we investigated whether maternal exposure to POPs affects glucose homeostasis and whether maternal FA supplementation counteracts POP effects transmitted via male descendants. Sprague–Dawley founder dams (F0) were fed a diet containing 2 or 6 mg/kg of FA and were force-fed with either a POP mixture or corn oil for 9 weeks. Subsequent male descendants did not receive any treatment. Blood glucose, plasma insulin and C-peptide were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test in males aged 90 and 180 days from generation 1 (F1), 2 (F2) and 3 (F3). Prenatal POP exposure increased fasting glucose in 90-day-old F1 males and C-peptide in 90-day-old F2 males. Prenatal FA supplementation decreased C-peptide in 90 and 180-day-old F1 males. In 180-day-old F3 males, FA supplementation counteracted POPs on fasting and postglucose C-peptide, indicating reduced insulin secretion. Prenatal exposure to an environmentally relevant POP mixture caused abnormalities in glucose homeostasis that are transmitted from one generation to the next through the paternal lineage. Prenatal FA supplementation counteracted some of the deleterious effects of POPs on glucose homeostasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Environmental Pollutants on Metabolic Defects)
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Review

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Review
Bisphenols and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes: The Role of the Skeletal Muscle and Adipose Tissue
Environments 2021, 8(4), 35; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments8040035 - 19 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 958
Abstract
Bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol S (BPS) are environmental contaminants that have been associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Two organs that are often implicated in the development of insulin resistance are the skeletal muscle and the [...] Read more.
Bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol S (BPS) are environmental contaminants that have been associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Two organs that are often implicated in the development of insulin resistance are the skeletal muscle and the adipose tissue, however, seldom studies have investigated the effects of bisphenols on their metabolism. In this review we discuss metabolic perturbations that occur in both the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue affected with insulin resistance, and how exposure to BPA or BPS has been linked to these changes. Furthermore, we highlight the possible effects of BPA on the cross-talk between the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Environmental Pollutants on Metabolic Defects)
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