Special Issue "Effect of the Application of Organic Waste on the Dynamics of Pesticides in Soils"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. María Sonia Rodríguez-Cruz
E-Mail Website1 Website2 Website3
Guest Editor
CSIC-Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Salamanca (IRNASA), Salamanca, Spain
Interests: pesticide; soil; adsorption–desorption; leaching; immobilization; biodegradation; dissipation; organic sorbents; contamination; soil remediation; organic amendments; soil microbiology
Dr. Jesús M. Marín-Benito
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Salamanca (IRNASA), CSIC, 37008 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: pesticide dynamics; adsorption; desorption; degradation; mobility; soil; water; contamination; organic amendments; pollution prevention; pesticide fate models

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The application of organic wastes as soil amendments improves the organic matter (OM) content, and preserves the functionality and fertility of soils, especially in those with a poor OM content. Pesticides ensure food supply, increase crop yields, and protect crops from pests. The simultaneous application of organic wastes and pesticides to soils is now a common agricultural management practice. The dynamics of pesticides in soils can be modified after the application of different organic wastes with high OM content. The solid and liquid OM of these organic wastes may modify the physicochemical behavior of pesticides in soils (adsorption–desorption, mobility, degradation, etc.), affecting soil quality and surface and ground waters when these compounds are applied to the soil. This Special Issue invites critical reviews and research papers providing innovative insights into the effect of applying organic wastes on the dynamics of pesticides in soils from agricultural and environmental perspectives.

We particularly invite contributions concerning various aspects of the agricultural and environmental implications of the application of organic wastes of different origin (agricultural, urban, agro-forestry, agro-industry, etc.) in soils to assess their long-term impact on soil OM and quality, its effect on the dynamics of pesticides at laboratory and field scale across different soil types and agricultural systems, as well as pesticide fate modelling studies within this context and these scales. Moreover, evaluations of the impact of organic wastes and pesticides on the structure and functioning of soil microbial communities are also welcome.

Dr. María Sonia Rodríguez-Cruz
Dr. Jesús M. Marín-Benito
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pesticides (herbicides/fungicides/insecticides, etc.)
  • organic residue/waste/amendment
  • agricultural soil
  • dissipation/degradation/mineralization
  • adsorption/retention/immobilization/desorption
  • leaching/mobility/transport
  • remediation of soil contamination
  • water contamination prevention
  • soil microbiology
  • pesticide fate modelling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Adsorption and Degradation of Three Pesticides in a Vineyard Soil and in an Organic Biomix
Environments 2020, 7(12), 113; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments7120113 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1661
Abstract
A soil and an organic biomix (soil/vine branch/garden compost 20/40/40) were used in this lab experiment to evaluate adsorption and degradation parameters for three pesticides (chlorpyrifos, metalaxyl and cymoxanil) used in a vineyard. Adsorption in the biomix material was higher than in the [...] Read more.
A soil and an organic biomix (soil/vine branch/garden compost 20/40/40) were used in this lab experiment to evaluate adsorption and degradation parameters for three pesticides (chlorpyrifos, metalaxyl and cymoxanil) used in a vineyard. Adsorption in the biomix material was higher than in the soil for the three pesticides and chlorpyrifos was the most adsorbed pesticide. The role of the organic carbon is essential for enhancing the adsortion of the three pesticides, especially for the most apolar chlorpyrifos. Degradation was generally faster in the biomix material than in the soil although the process was slower in the case of chlorpyrifos if compared with the other two chemicals, due to a more toxic effect of this pesticide on soil microflora and a larger adsorption of this pesticide on the organic biomix that reduces its availability for dissipation. Amendment with cheap and available organic wastes or a grass-covered management of soil in the vineyard could reduce the impact of pesticides in the vineyard ecosystem and contribute to the sustainable management of chemicals in the environment. Full article
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Article
Effect of Multiple Stresses, Organic Amendment and Compaction, on the Fate and Impact of Isoproturon in Soil
Environments 2020, 7(10), 79; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments7100079 - 29 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1464
Abstract
Organic matter decline and compaction are two major processes of soil degradation. Organic amendment is a current practice to compensate the loss of organic matter, which could in addition contribute to increase soil aggregate stability and limit compaction. Therefore, the objective of this [...] Read more.
Organic matter decline and compaction are two major processes of soil degradation. Organic amendment is a current practice to compensate the loss of organic matter, which could in addition contribute to increase soil aggregate stability and limit compaction. Therefore, the objective of this work was to study the effect of multiple physico-chemical stresses, organic amendment (compost of sewage sludge and green waste) addition and soil compaction, on the fate and impact (measured through the urease enzyme activity) of isoproturon. Compost addition and compaction did not significantly affect the fate and impact of isoproturon. The lack of effect of compost can be due to the delay between soil sampling and soil amendment. Compaction had no effect probably because the porosity reduction does not affect the habitable pore space accessible to degrading microorganisms. Nevertheless, isoproturon significantly increased the urease enzyme activity in compacted and not compacted unamended soils contrary to the amended ones. It seems that the organic amendment could act as a buffer with regards to the impact of isoproturon. The results obtained in this work suggest that, in general, the fate and impact of isoproturon in soils will not change following compaction and/or organic amendment addition, neither the corresponding risks for the environment. Full article
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Review

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Review
Effect of Organic Residues on Pesticide Behavior in Soils: A Review of Laboratory Research
Environments 2021, 8(4), 32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments8040032 - 14 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1358
Abstract
The management of large volumes of organic residues generated in different livestock, urban, agricultural and industrial activities is a topic of environmental and social interest. The high organic matter content of these residues means that their application as soil organic amendments in agriculture [...] Read more.
The management of large volumes of organic residues generated in different livestock, urban, agricultural and industrial activities is a topic of environmental and social interest. The high organic matter content of these residues means that their application as soil organic amendments in agriculture is considered one of the more sustainable options, as it could solve the problem of the accumulation of uncontrolled wastes while improving soil quality and avoiding its irreversible degradation. However, the behavior of pesticides applied to increase crop yields could be modified in the presence of these amendments in the soil. This review article addresses how the adsorption–desorption, dissipation and leaching of pesticides in soils is affected by different organic residues usually applied as organic amendments. Based on the results reported from laboratory studies, the influence on these processes has been evaluated of multiple factors related to organic residues (e.g., origin, nature, composition, rates, and incubation time of the amended soils), pesticides (e.g., with different use, structure, characteristics, and application method), and soils with different physicochemical properties. Future perspectives on this topic are also included for highlighting the need to extend these laboratory studies to field and modelling scale to better assess and predict pesticide fate in amended soil scenarios. Full article
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