Special Issue "Soil Nutrient Dynamics and Plant Response"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 May 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Elias Afif Khouri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Organisms and Systems Biology, University of Oviedo, 33003 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: sorption; environment; soil; organic matter
Prof. Jose Alberto Oliveira Prendes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Organisms and Systems Biology, University of Oviedo, 33003 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: pasture management; genetic diversity; crop production; forage crops; soil fertility
Dr. Pedro Álvarez-Álvarez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Organisms and Systems Biology, Polytechnic School of Mieres, University of Oviedo, E-33600 Mieres, Asturias, Spain
Interests: forest ecosystems; ecosystems services; spatial patterns; ecological process; multi-scale
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The dynamics of macro and micro metal elements in the soil determines the efficiency of plant nutrient use, its productivity and its response to environmental changes to a great extent. Anthropogenic additions increase the availability of some chemical elements in industrialized areas altering the nutrient balance in the soil. Under natural conditions, other factors such as climate (especially temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration) and water availability in the soil or atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide limit plant production and reduce the importance of nutrients as limiting factors. For example, it is known that an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide causes an increase in forest biomass in forests established on rich soils, but not in those found on poor soils.

We invite authors to present current research on how the nutrient cycle is affected by the interaction of global change and human activities. We also welcome presentations of studies related to the interaction between organic matter and soil minerals, the effect of soil contamination and degradation on its fertility and plant adaptations to increase efficiency in nutrient use.

Dr. Elias Khouri
Prof. Jose Alberto Oliveira Prendes
Dr. Pedro Álvarez-Álvarez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • methods for predicting soil carbon and nutrients
  • mineral-organic associations
  • nutrient assimilation efficiency
  • soil carbon and nutrients
  • soil properties
  • sorption / precipitation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Screening of Pioneer Metallophyte Plant Species with Phytoremediation Potential at a Severely Contaminated Hg and As Mining Site
Environments 2021, 8(7), 63; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments8070063 - 05 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Phytoremediation of mine soils contaminated by potentially toxic elements (PTEs) requires the use of tolerant plants given the specific conditions of toxicity in the altered soil ecosystems. In this sense, a survey was conducted in an ancient Hg-mining area named “El Terronal” (Asturias, [...] Read more.
Phytoremediation of mine soils contaminated by potentially toxic elements (PTEs) requires the use of tolerant plants given the specific conditions of toxicity in the altered soil ecosystems. In this sense, a survey was conducted in an ancient Hg-mining area named “El Terronal” (Asturias, Spain) which is severely affected by PTE contamination (As, Hg, Pb) to obtain an inventory of the spontaneous natural vegetation. A detailed habitat classification was performed and a specific index of coverage was applied after a one-year quadrat study in various sampling stations; seven species were finally selected (Agrostis tenuis, Betula celtiberica, Calluna vulgaris, Dactylis glomerata, Plantago lanceolata, Salix atrocinerea and Trifolium repens). A total of 21 samples (3 per plant) of the soil–plant system were collected and analyzed for the available and total concentrations of contaminants in soil and plants (roots and aerial parts). Most of the studied plant species were classified as non-accumulating plants, with particular exceptions as Calluna vulgaris for Pb and Dactylis glomerata for As. Overall, the results revealed interest for phytoremediation treatments, especially phytostabilization, as most of the plants studied were classified as excluder metallophytes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Nutrient Dynamics and Plant Response)
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Article
Effects of Management Practices on Soil Properties and Plant Nutrition in Hay Meadows in Picos de Europa
Environments 2021, 8(5), 38; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments8050038 - 25 Apr 2021
Viewed by 750
Abstract
Fertilization and mowing affects the physico-chemical properties of soils, as well as the characteristics of the plants growing on them. Changes in the management techniques are causing semi-natural grasslands to disappear all over Europe. These grasslands host a great amount of diversity, thus [...] Read more.
Fertilization and mowing affects the physico-chemical properties of soils, as well as the characteristics of the plants growing on them. Changes in the management techniques are causing semi-natural grasslands to disappear all over Europe. These grasslands host a great amount of diversity, thus their conservation is a top priority. This work studies whether the kind of management has an influence on the soil properties and the foliar content in macronutrients in 25 hay meadows located in Picos de Europa (10 in Asturias, 10 in Castilla y León and 5 in Cantabria). Soils at a 0–20 cm depth showed a high content of organic matter and a low C/N ratio. Effective cation exchange capacity was adequate for a texture, which varied from sandy clay loam to loam, with an average clay content of 17%. Mean values of foliar nutrient concentrations showed a deficiency in K. In this study, management practices were shown to affect some properties of the soils, namely pH, sand percentage and exchangeable K and Ca, to different extents. The highest values of pH and exchangeable Ca were significantly correlated with the least intensive management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Nutrient Dynamics and Plant Response)
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