Special Issue "Advances in Plant Epigenetics and Epigenomics"

A special issue of Epigenomes (ISSN 2075-4655).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cao Xuan Hieu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Biology/Plant Physiology, Weinbergweg, D-06120, Halle (Saale), Germany
Interests: plant genomics; epigenetics; plant physiology; plant development; genome evolution; plant cytogenetics; stress tolerance; next-generation sequencing; ChIP-seq; proteomics; protein–protein interaction; genome editing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Vu Thi Ha Giang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), D-06466, Gatersleben, Germany
Interests: plant genetics; plant genomics; epigenetics; genome evolution; DNA repair; chromosome biology; crop breeding; next-generation sequencing; genome editing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advancements in high-throughput sequencing technologies and powerful computational tools have provided the unprecedented opportunity to explore the complex epigenetic and chromatin dynamics at genome-wide levels. This Special Issue provides a forum for state-of-the-art studies on plant epigenetics and epigenomics. We welcome submissions of original research, cutting-edge methods, or expert review manuscripts reporting, but not limited to, on the following topics:

  • Epigenomics, chromatin compartments, and the functional structure of the plant genome
  • Epigenomics and the control of fate, form, and function in plant cells
  • Chromatin and epigenome dynamics during plant development and in response to environmental factors
  • Bridging plant epigenomics and the mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance and plasticity
  • Adaptation and evolution of genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks
  • Framework for the integration of genomics, epigenomics, and transcriptomics in crop breeding
  • Future of plant research in the age of epigenomics, single-cell epigenomics, and epigenetic editing

Dr. Cao Xuan Hieu
Dr. Vu Thi Ha Giang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Epigenomes is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant epigenomics
  • epigenetic inheritance
  • chromatin organization
  • DNA methylation
  • histone modification

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
The EpiDiverse Plant Epigenome-Wide Association Studies (EWAS) Pipeline
Epigenomes 2021, 5(2), 12; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/epigenomes5020012 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 292
Abstract
Bisulfite sequencing is a widely used technique for determining DNA methylation and its relationship with epigenetics, genetics, and environmental parameters. Various techniques were implemented for epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) to reveal meaningful associations; however, there are only very few plant studies available to [...] Read more.
Bisulfite sequencing is a widely used technique for determining DNA methylation and its relationship with epigenetics, genetics, and environmental parameters. Various techniques were implemented for epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) to reveal meaningful associations; however, there are only very few plant studies available to date. Here, we developed the EpiDiverse EWAS pipeline and tested it using two plant datasets, from P. abies (Norway spruce) and Q. lobata (valley oak). Hence, we present an EWAS implementation tested for non-model plant species and describe its use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Epigenetics and Epigenomics)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Quantitative Epigenetics: A New Avenue for Crop Improvement
Epigenomes 2020, 4(4), 25; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/epigenomes4040025 - 07 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1531
Abstract
Plant breeding conventionally depends on genetic variability available in a species to improve a particular trait in the crop. However, epigenetic diversity may provide an additional tier of variation. The recent advent of epigenome technologies has elucidated the role of epigenetic variation in [...] Read more.
Plant breeding conventionally depends on genetic variability available in a species to improve a particular trait in the crop. However, epigenetic diversity may provide an additional tier of variation. The recent advent of epigenome technologies has elucidated the role of epigenetic variation in shaping phenotype. Furthermore, the development of epigenetic recombinant inbred lines (epi-RILs) in model species such as Arabidopsis has enabled accurate genetic analysis of epigenetic variation. Subsequently, mapping of epigenetic quantitative trait loci (epiQTL) allowed association between epialleles and phenotypic traits. Likewise, epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) and epi-genotyping by sequencing (epi-GBS) have revolutionized the field of epigenetics research in plants. Thus, quantitative epigenetics provides ample opportunities to dissect the role of epigenetic variation in trait regulation, which can be eventually utilized in crop improvement programs. Moreover, locus-specific manipulation of DNA methylation by epigenome-editing tools such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) can potentially facilitate epigenetic based molecular breeding of important crop plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Epigenetics and Epigenomics)
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