Special Issue "Probiotics and Prebiotics: New Knowledge"

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Metabolism, Physiology & Genetics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Plessas Stavros
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Microbiology, Biotechnology and Hygiene, Department of Agricultural Development, Democritus University of Thrace, 68200 Orestiada, Greece
Interests: functional foods; fruit juices; probiotics; prebiotics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Probiotics are claimed to deliver several substantial health benefits when consumed. The major advantage provided by probiotics is the maintenance of the microbial balance, which leads to the improvement of gut function. The probiotic bacteria dominate over the pathogenic microorganisms either because of their competition for the points of attachment in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract or because of produced antimicrobial substances from the probiotics. On the other hand, prebiotic substances alter the microbial balance in the GI tract, favoring the growth of probiotic bacteria. Prebiotics selectively modulate and stimulate the microbiota's diversity and improve the integrity of the intestinal barrier.

This Special Issue of Fermentation aims to disseminate recent innovative research regarding probiotics and prebiotics, as well as authoritative reviews that compile information from previously published material. Topics include (but are not limited to) microorganisms for the production of functional foods, nutraceutical, starter cultures, lactic acid bacteria, fermentation, fructooligosaccharides, synbiotics, immobilized cells, etc.

Assistant Professor Plessas Stavros
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • probiotics
  • prebiotics
  • functional
  • nutraceutical
  • starter cultures
  • lactic acid bacteria
  • fermentation
  • fructooligosaccharides
  • synbiotics
  • fermentation technology
  • immobilized cells

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
In Vitro Evaluation of Adhesion Capacity, Hydrophobicity, and Auto-Aggregation of Newly Isolated Potential Probiotic Strains
Fermentation 2019, 5(4), 100; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation5040100 - 04 Dec 2019
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 1912
Abstract
We isolated several strains of human and animal origin, focusing on the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Samples of cow colostrum, feces and saliva of calves and piglets, and infant feces were acquired, bacterial strains were isolated and identified, and twenty strains of [...] Read more.
We isolated several strains of human and animal origin, focusing on the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Samples of cow colostrum, feces and saliva of calves and piglets, and infant feces were acquired, bacterial strains were isolated and identified, and twenty strains of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were shortlisted for further in vitro analysis of adhesion capacity to human cells, surface hydrophobicity, and auto-aggregation. Adhesion capacity was evaluated using a mixture of Caco-2 and HT-29-MTX cells and hydrophobicity was measured using the microbial adhesion to the hydrocarbon method. Lactobacillus reuteri was the most frequently isolated species, followed by L. casei subsp. paracasei and L. gasseri; all strains were isolated from infant feces. Bifidobacteria were represented by the species B. longum (infant feces), and B. thermophilum and B. pseudolongum (calves, piglets). All twenty strains showed good adhesion capacities to the mixed cell culture (17.7–37.2%), particularly, L. reuteri isolates K7 and K14 (37.2% and 35.5%, respectively). In hydrophobicity and auto-aggregation assays, strain-specific differences irrespective of the origin or taxonomic group were observed. Hydrophobicity values varied considerably (from 6.1% to 87.4%), whereas auto-aggregation ability ranged from 21.7% to 69.7%. No relation was observed between hydrophobicity and adhesion capacity; instead, auto-aggregation was apparently related with adhesion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics: New Knowledge)
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Article
Assessment of Volatile Compounds Evolution, Antioxidant Activity, and Total Phenolics Content during Cold Storage of Pomegranate Beverage Fermented by Lactobacillus paracasei K5
Fermentation 2018, 4(4), 95; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation4040095 - 15 Nov 2018
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2171
Abstract
A recently isolate from feta type cheese, potential probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei K5, was applied for pomegranate juice (Punica granutum L.) fermentation. Fermentations were carried out for 24 h followed by the storage of pomegranate juices at 4 °C for 4 weeks. [...] Read more.
A recently isolate from feta type cheese, potential probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei K5, was applied for pomegranate juice (Punica granutum L.) fermentation. Fermentations were carried out for 24 h followed by the storage of pomegranate juices at 4 °C for 4 weeks. The parameters examined were a composition of volatile compounds, antioxidant activity, total phenolic content, and consumers’ acceptance. The results were encouraging showing that lactic acid fermentation enhanced the composition of volatile compounds even at the fourth week of storage. Increased antioxidant activity (151.44 mg TE/100 mL at the second week) and total phenolics content (285 mg GAE/100 mL at the third week) were observed for all the storage times compared to the initial pomegranate beverage. The fermented pomegranate beverage received better scores for the last 3 weeks of cold storage compared to the non-fermented one. Likewise, L. paracasei K5 was proved to be suitable for the production of functional pomegranate beverages with enhanced aromatic characteristics and high nutritional value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics: New Knowledge)
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Review

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Review
Review on Non-Dairy Probiotics and Their Use in Non-Dairy Based Products
Fermentation 2020, 6(1), 30; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation6010030 - 26 Feb 2020
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 3387
Abstract
Consumer demands for foods promoting health while preventing diseases have led to development of functional foods that contain probiotic bacteria. Fermented dairy products are good substrates for probiotic delivery, but the large number of lactose intolerant people, their high fat and cholesterol content [...] Read more.
Consumer demands for foods promoting health while preventing diseases have led to development of functional foods that contain probiotic bacteria. Fermented dairy products are good substrates for probiotic delivery, but the large number of lactose intolerant people, their high fat and cholesterol content and also due to the growing vegetarianism the consumers are seeking for alternatives. Therefore, researches have been widely studied the feasibility of probiotic bacteria in non-dairy products such as fruits, vegetables, and cereals. This review describes the application of probiotic cultures in non-dairy food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics: New Knowledge)
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Review
Assessment of Pomegranate Juice as an Alternative “Substrate” for Probiotic Delivery. Recent Advances and Prospects
Fermentation 2020, 6(1), 24; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation6010024 - 12 Feb 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1457
Abstract
The probiotic products in the market are mostly milk-based products, such as yoghurts, cheese and fermented milk. However, lately, there has been an increasing demand for non-dairy probiotic products due to various reasons such as allergies, lactose intolerance, high cholesterol content and consumers [...] Read more.
The probiotic products in the market are mostly milk-based products, such as yoghurts, cheese and fermented milk. However, lately, there has been an increasing demand for non-dairy probiotic products due to various reasons such as allergies, lactose intolerance, high cholesterol content and consumers turning to more natural foods. Fruit juices are considered as an appropriate new substrate for probiotic delivery. From these, pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is gaining more attention in recent years. Pomegranate is a fruit known since ancient times for its therapeutic qualities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral and antitumor properties, among others. Pomegranate juice contains a range of bioactive compounds such as phytochemicals, like polyphenols, ellagitannins, anthocyanins and punicalagins. The fermentation of the juice with probiotic strains seems to provide beverages of high nutritional values and accepted organoleptic quality. Therefore, the aim of this comprehensive review is to present an overview of the innovative in vitro and in vivo assays that have taken place regarding fermentation of pomegranate juice by probiotic bacteria. In addition, various drawbacks are underlined and solutions are proposed and discussed regarding the feasibility of pomegranate juice as an alternative substrate for probiotic delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics: New Knowledge)
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Review
Bioprospecting for Bioactive Peptide Production by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Fermented Dairy Food
Fermentation 2019, 5(4), 96; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation5040096 - 05 Nov 2019
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 3272
Abstract
With rapidly ageing populations, the world is experiencing unsustainable healthcare from chronic diseases such as metabolic, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, and cancer disorders. Healthy diet and lifestyle might contribute to prevent these diseases and potentially enhance health outcomes in patients during and after therapy. Fermented [...] Read more.
With rapidly ageing populations, the world is experiencing unsustainable healthcare from chronic diseases such as metabolic, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, and cancer disorders. Healthy diet and lifestyle might contribute to prevent these diseases and potentially enhance health outcomes in patients during and after therapy. Fermented dairy foods (FDFs) found their origin concurrently with human civilization for increasing milk shelf-life and enhancing sensorial attributes. Although the probiotic concept has been developed more recently, FDFs, such as milks and yoghurt, have been unconsciously associated with health-promoting effects since ancient times. These health benefits rely not only on the occurrence of fermentation-associated live microbes (mainly lactic acid bacteria; LAB), but also on the pro-health molecules (PHMs) mostly derived from microbial conversion of food compounds. Therefore, there is a renaissance of interest toward traditional fermented food as a reservoir of novel microbes producing PHMs, and “hyperfoods” can be tailored to deliver these healthy molecules to humans. In FDFs, the main PHMs are bioactive peptides (BPs) released from milk proteins by microbial proteolysis. BPs display a pattern of biofunctions such as anti-hypertensive, antioxidant, immuno-modulatory, and anti-microbial activities. Here, we summarized the BPs most frequently encountered in dairy food and their biological activities; we reviewed the main studies exploring the potential of dairy microbiota to release BPs; and delineated the main effectors of the proteolytic LAB systems responsible for BPs release. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics: New Knowledge)
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Review
Functional Role of Probiotics and Prebiotics on Skin Health and Disease
Fermentation 2019, 5(2), 41; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fermentation5020041 - 17 May 2019
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 7655
Abstract
Scientific and commercial interest of probiotics, prebiotics and their effect on human health and disease has increased in the last decade. The aim of this review article is to evaluate the role of pro- and prebiotics on the normal function of healthy skin [...] Read more.
Scientific and commercial interest of probiotics, prebiotics and their effect on human health and disease has increased in the last decade. The aim of this review article is to evaluate the role of pro- and prebiotics on the normal function of healthy skin as well as their role in the prevention and therapy of skin disease. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium are the most commonly used probiotics and thought to mediate skin inflammation, treat atopic dermatitis (AD) and prevent allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Probiotics are shown to decolonise skin pathogens (e.g., P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, A. Vulgaris, etc.) while kefir is also shown to support the immunity of the skin and treat skin pathogens through the production of antimicrobial substances and prebiotics. Finally, prebiotics (e.g., Fructo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides and konjac glucomannan hydrolysates) can contribute to the treatment of diseases including ACD, acne and photo aging primarily by enhancing the growth of probiotics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics: New Knowledge)
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