Topical Collection "Technical Forum for Fire Science Laboratory and Field Methods"

A topical collection in Fire (ISSN 2571-6255). This collection belongs to the section "Fire Science Models, Remote Sensing, and Data".

Editors

Prof. Dr. Claire Belcher
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Geography, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QE, UK
Interests: fire and the Earth system; fire behavior; fire severity
Dr. David M.J.S. Bowman
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
School of Natural Sciences, The University of Tasmania, Private Bag 55Hobart TAS 7001, Australia
Interests: fire ecology; pyrogeography; human fire use; landscape ecology; biogeography; wildlife management; fire and soils; vegetation dynamics; flammability; smoke health effects; fire management policy
Dr. Evan Ellicott
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Collection Editor
Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740, USA
Interests: wildfire; fire; remote sensing; land cover; land use
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Peter Hamlington
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Turbulence and Energy Systems Laboratory (teslacu.org) Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
Interests: high-fidelity simulations; physics-based combustion; computational fluid dynamics
Dr. Chad M. Hoffman
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Forest & Rangeland Stewardship, Colorado State University, 1472 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: wildland fire science; fire behavior modeling and simulation; fuel dynamics; fuel management; forest restoration; fire ecology; disturbance ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. William M. Jolly
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 5775 US West Highway 10, Missoula, MT 59808, USA
Interests: fire behavior; ecophysiology; phenology; modeling
Dr. Rodman Linn
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Earth and Environmental Science Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
Interests: wildfire behavior; atmosphere/turbine interaction; ecosystem/atmosphere coupling; turbulence; multiphase flow
Dr. Sara McAllister
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
United States Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory, 5775 Hwy 10 W, Missoula, MT 59808, USA
Interests: burning rates; convection ignition; physics of fire spread
Dr. Joseph O'Brien
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
USDA Forest Service, 320 Green Street, Athens, GA 30602-2044, USA
Interests: fire ecology; ecophysiology; forest disturbance; interactions among disturbances; conservation biology and management of rare and endangered species
Prof. Dr. Albert Simeoni
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Worcester Polytechnic Institute 100 Institute Rd, Worcester, MA 01609, USA
Interests: fires; combustion; wildland fires; wildfires
Prof. Dr. Alistair M. S. Smith
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Dr. Wojciech Węgrzyński
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Fire Research Department, Instytut Techniki Budowlanej, Filtrowa 1 St., Warsaw 00-611, Poland
Interests: smoke management; wind and fire coupled modeling; CFD modeling; building fires; visibility in smoke; smart systems in fire safety; smoke dispersion in the urban environment

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the 1950s, significant advances in wildland fire science have arisen due to research at combustion laboratories and during scaling and validation experiments in planned landscape fires. Often, calibration experiments, technical descriptions of methods and equipment, and descriptions of data go unpublished or are relegated to supplemental material. However, this can make it difficult for standards to be identified or for mistakes to be avoided by subsequent researchers. Furthermore, available data on physical properties such as thermal conductivity, bulk density, specific gravity, and heat of combustion are often difficult to find. This Topical Collection provides a permanent forum for wildland fire combustion laboratory and associated field researchers to share advances associated with data, equipment, and analytical methods.

We welcome articles, technical notes, reviews, perspectives and viewpoints, and conference papers. Articles should seek to validate or cross-compare a method or model using laboratory or in situ measurements.

Topics can include but are not limited to technical descriptions and assessments of the following:

  • Combustion laboratory experimental designs to explore any aspect of fire science (structural or wildland fire).
  • Landscape fire or in situ field experimental designs that scale up laboratory research to assess wildland fuel, fire behavior, or fire effects.
  • Models used in structural or wildland fire science, provided information is included on how they can be validated using laboratory or in situ measurements.
  • Sensors, methods, and equipment to measure properties of wildland fuel in combustion laboratories and scaled-up in situ fires (e.g., moisture content, mineral and chemical composition, bulk density, flammability).
  • Sensors, methods, and equipment to measure properties of fire behavior in combustion laboratories and scaled-up in-situ fires (e.g., rates of spread, heat transfer, air flow, flame heights, temperatures, environmental conditions).
  • Sensors, methods, and equipment to measure properties of post-fire effects in combustion laboratories and scaled-up in situ fires (e.g., emissions, mass-loss rates, plant morphology and physiology, soil processes).
  • Calibration and validation experiments related to models or new sensors and equipment in combustion laboratories and scaled-up in situ fires.
  • Technical notes describing how to correctly conduct common fire science laboratory and in situ measurements, especially where mistakes are common in the literature or in practice.
  • Articles focused on scaling of research from laboratories to in situ fires.

Prof. Dr. Claire Belcher
Dr. David M.J.S. Bowman
Dr. Evan Ellicott
Dr. Peter Hamlington
Dr. Chad M. Hoffma
Dr. William M. Jolly
Dr. Rodman Linn
Dr. Sara McAllister
Dr. Joseph O'Brien
Prof. Dr. Albert Simeoni
Dr. Alistair M. S. Smith
Dr. Wojciech Węgrzyński
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fire is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • calibration
  • validation
  • modeling
  • data
  • standards
  • scaling

Published Papers (2 papers)

2021

Article
Numerical Analysis of Smoke Behavior and Detection of Solid Combustible Fire Developed in Manned Exploration Module Based on Exploration Gravity
Fire 2021, 4(4), 85; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fire4040085 - 19 Nov 2021
Viewed by 205
Abstract
A fire during manned space exploration can cause serious casualties and disrupt the mission if the initial response is delayed. Therefore, measurement technology that can detect fire in the early stage of ignition is important. There have been a number of works that [...] Read more.
A fire during manned space exploration can cause serious casualties and disrupt the mission if the initial response is delayed. Therefore, measurement technology that can detect fire in the early stage of ignition is important. There have been a number of works that investigate the smoke behaviors in microgravity as the foundation for a reliable method for sensing a fire during spaceflight. For space missions to the outer planets, however, a strategy of detecting smoke as an indicator of fire should be adjusted to cover the fire scenario that can be greatly affected by changes in gravity (microgravity, lunar, Mars, and Earth gravity). Therefore, as a preliminary study on fire detectors of the manned pressurized module, the present study examined the smoke particle behavior and detection characteristics with respect to changes in gravity using numerical analysis. In particular, the effects of the combination of buoyancy and ventilation flow on the smoke particle movement pattern was investigated to further improve the understanding of the fire detection characteristics of the smoke detector, assuming that a fire occurred in different gravity environments inside the pressurized module. To this end, we modeled the internal shape of Destiny and performed a series of numerical analysis using the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS). The findings of this study can provide basic data for the design of a fire detection system for manned space exploration modules. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Numerical Analysis of Seismic Performances of Post-Fire Scoria Aggregate Concrete Beam-Column Joints
Fire 2021, 4(4), 70; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fire4040070 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 302
Abstract
In order to analyze the post-fire seismic performances of scoria aggregate concrete (SAC) beam-column joints precisely and effectively, one finite element model (FEM) was developed to simulate the seismic behavior of SAC beam-column joints. The FEM consists of two sequential parts: firstly, the [...] Read more.
In order to analyze the post-fire seismic performances of scoria aggregate concrete (SAC) beam-column joints precisely and effectively, one finite element model (FEM) was developed to simulate the seismic behavior of SAC beam-column joints. The FEM consists of two sequential parts: firstly, the heat transfer analysis of the beam-column joints, and then the seismic analysis of the SAC joints by combining the temperature field distribution obtained from the heat transfer analysis with the mechanical properties of the SAC after fire, both of which were implemented in ABAQUS. In order to make the simulation results more accurate, spring elements were applied to simulate the bond–slip behavior with material degradation due to fire damage in the simulation of seismic analysis. Moreover, in order to validate the FEM, the seismic behavior of the natural aggregate concrete (NAC) beam-column joints after fire was simulated with the established FEM, and the simulation results were compared with the available test data. It is proved that the FEM we built was accurate and effective and provided efficient solutions for evaluating the seismic performance of post-fire beam-column joints so that the effects of various parameters, namely, fire time, longitudinal reinforcement ratio, and axial compression ratio on the seismic performance of SAC beam-column joints after fire were investigated in depth, which indicated the increase of axial compression ratio can improve the strength, initial stiffness, and energy dissipation capacity of SAC joints, while the increase of longitudinal reinforcement ratio can increase the strength and stiffness of SAC joints to a small extent, but too high reinforcement ratio will significantly weaken the energy dissipation capacity of SAC joints. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

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