Special Issue "Integration of Nutrition and Physiology in Aquatic Animals"

A special issue of Fishes (ISSN 2410-3888).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Vikas Kumar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Aquaculture Research Institute, Department of Animal, Veterinary and Food Sciences, University of Idaho. 875 Perimeter Drive MS 2330, Moscow, ID 83844, USA
Interests: fish nutrition and nutrient requirements; feed processing and manufacturing technology; nutritional physiology; nutrient metabolism; nutrigenomics
Dr. Beth Cleveland
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Leetown Rd, Kearneysville, WV 25430, USA
Interests: nutritional physiology; nutrient–gene interaction; muscle physiology; functional genomics; gene editing; nutrient partitioning
Dr. Janet Genz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mathematics, Sciences, and Technology, University of West Georgia, 1601 Maple Street, Carrollton, GA 30118, USA
Interests: epithelial transport physiology; nutrition; energy metabolism; larval development of fishes; conservation aquaculture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our Special Issue “Integration of Nutrition and Physiology in Aquatic Animals” welcomes the submission of reviews or manuscripts describing original research aimed at improving aquatic animal performance under dietary intervention and environmentally associated nutrients. The goal of this Special Issue is to collect contributions of high scientific quality that focus on the integration of nutrition and physiology and its subsequent impacts on aquatic animal metabolism, overall growth performance, or ecological performance. Our major focus is the latest advances in the field of nutritional physiology at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. Investigations into interactions between nutrition and ecological adaptations are also of interest.

Dr. Vikas Kumar
Dr. Beth Cleveland
Dr. Janet Genz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fishes is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fish and shellfish
  • integrated nutrition
  • dietary manipulations
  • digestive physiology
  • nutrient metabolism
  • nutrient–gene interactions
  • nutritional ecology
  • nutrient impacts on ecological performance and/or growth
  • ecological physiology
  • environmental physiology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Growth, Chemical Composition, Histology and Antioxidant Genes of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Fed Whole or Pre-Processed Nannochloropsis oceanica and Tetraselmis sp.
Fishes 2021, 6(3), 23; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes6030023 - 23 Jul 2021
Viewed by 626
Abstract
New sustainable feed ingredients are a necessity for the salmon aquaculture industry. In this study, we examined the effect of pre-extrusion processing of two microalgae, Nannochloropsis oceanica and Tetraselmis sp., on the growth, fatty acid content in the flesh and health of [...] Read more.
New sustainable feed ingredients are a necessity for the salmon aquaculture industry. In this study, we examined the effect of pre-extrusion processing of two microalgae, Nannochloropsis oceanica and Tetraselmis sp., on the growth, fatty acid content in the flesh and health of Atlantic salmon. The fish were fed one of the following five diets for nine weeks: (1) CO: a fish meal-based control (basal) diet, (2) NU: a Nannochloropsis diet, (3) NE: a pre-extruded Nannochloropsis diet, (4) TU: a Tetraselmis diet, and (5) TE: a pre-extruded Tetraselmis diet. The algae-incorporated diets contained 30% of the respective microalgae. Our results showed that the best growth performance was achieved by the CO diet, followed by the NE diets. Feeding of unprocessed Nannochloropsis and Tetraselmis resulted in a significant reduction in enterocyte vacuolization compared to the CO feeding. A significant effect of processing was noted in the fillet fatty acid content, the intestine and liver structure and the expression of selected genes in the liver. The expression of antioxidant genes in both the liver and intestine, and the accumulation of different fatty acids in the fillet and liver of the extruded algae-fed groups, warrants further investigation. In conclusion, based on the short-term study, 30% inclusion of the microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica and Tetraselmis sp. can be considered in Atlantic salmon feeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integration of Nutrition and Physiology in Aquatic Animals)
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Communication
Acceptance of a Protein Concentrate from Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) by Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) Fed a Formulated Diet
Fishes 2021, 6(2), 9; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes6020009 - 25 Mar 2021
Viewed by 773
Abstract
The majority of plant proteins used in aquatic feeds are derived from seed meals, which may contain antinutritional factors. Protein concentrates from plant foliage have received less attention in fish feeding trials. Alfalfa protein concentrate (APC) is derived from fresh alfalfa foliage that [...] Read more.
The majority of plant proteins used in aquatic feeds are derived from seed meals, which may contain antinutritional factors. Protein concentrates from plant foliage have received less attention in fish feeding trials. Alfalfa protein concentrate (APC) is derived from fresh alfalfa foliage that contains approximately 52% protein and is low in fiber. A feeding trial was done to assess growth and feed efficiency responses of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) fed a formulated diet with 180 g/kg APC replacing all fishmeal compared to a control isonitrogenous diet with fishmeal. Yellow perch accepted the APC diet but gained weight at a lower specific growth rate (−0.07% per day) and had an elevated feed conversion ratio (+0.32 g feed/g growth) than fish on the control diet containing fishmeal. There was no impact on survivorship or condition nor differences in fillet yield or composition in fish on the diet with APC compared to the control fishmeal diet. These findings indicate that although replacing fishmeal with APC in a perch diet resulted in slower growth rates, the APC was accepted and has promise as a sustainable protein in aquatic feeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integration of Nutrition and Physiology in Aquatic Animals)
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Article
Evaluating Coexistence of Fish Species with Coastal Cutthroat Trout in Low Order Streams of Western Oregon and Washington, USA
Fishes 2021, 6(1), 4; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes6010004 - 30 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1519
Abstract
When multiple species of fish coexist there are a host of potential ways through which they may interact, yet there is often a strong focus on studies of single species without considering these interactions. For example, many studies of forestry–stream interactions in the [...] Read more.
When multiple species of fish coexist there are a host of potential ways through which they may interact, yet there is often a strong focus on studies of single species without considering these interactions. For example, many studies of forestry–stream interactions in the Pacific Northwest have focused solely on the most prevalent species: Coastal cutthroat trout. To examine the potential for interactions of other fishes with coastal cutthroat trout, we conducted an analysis of 281 sites in low order streams located on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula and along the central Oregon coast. Coastal cutthroat trout and juvenile coho salmon were the most commonly found salmonid species within these streams and exhibited positive associations with each other for both presence and density. Steelhead were negatively associated with the presence of coastal cutthroat trout as well as with coho salmon and sculpins (Cottidae). Coastal cutthroat trout most frequently shared streams with juvenile coho salmon. For densities of these co-occurring species, associations between these two species were relatively weak compared to the strong influences of physical stream conditions (size and gradient), suggesting that physical conditions may have more of an influence on density than species interactions. Collectively, our analysis, along with a review of findings from prior field and laboratory studies, suggests that the net effect of interactions between coastal cutthroat trout and coho salmon do not appear to inhibit their presence or densities in small streams along the Pacific Northwest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integration of Nutrition and Physiology in Aquatic Animals)
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