Special Issue "Microbial Safety and Quality of Dairy Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Vincenzina Fusco
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Guest Editor
National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Sciences of Food Production, CNR-ISPA, Bari, Italy
Interests: nucleic acid-based methods to detect and quantify foodborne protechnological, probiotic, alterative and (opportunistic) pathogenic bacteria; microbial food quality, Weissella spp., lactic acid bacteria; selection and use of autochthonous (probiotic) microbial cultures; genomics; microbial food safety; (enterotoxigenic, methicillin-resistant) coagulase positive and negative staphylococci; Staphylococcus aureus; Listeria monocytogenes; Arcobacter spp.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesca Fanelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sciences of Food Production, Italian National Council of Research, ISPA-CNR, Via Amendola 122/O, 70126, Bari, Italy
Interests: genomics; microbial food safety; food spoilage; antibiotic resistance; virulence; biofilm; quorum sensing; foodborne pathogenic bacteria; Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus spp.; Arcobacter spp.; toxigenic fungi; fungal biotechnology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Fernando Pérez-Rodríguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence (ceiA3), University of Cordoba, 14014 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: food microbiology and safety; predictive microbiology; food biopreservation; molecular microbiology; high-throughput sequencing technologies; microbial risk assessment of foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This research topic will highlight the current knowledge on the microbial quality and safety of dairy foods. In particular we welcome research papers, case reports and reviews relevant but not limited to the composition, dynamics and role of microbial communities in dairy productions using omics approaches, quantitative microbial risk assessment, study and improvement (biopreservation technologies, isolation and use of autochthonous probiotic microorganisms, etc.) of microbial food quality and safety, molecular (genomic) characterization of emerging (opportunistic) dairy-borne pathogenic, probiotic, and alterative microorganisms and the relevant risk (benefit) assessment.

Dr. Vincenzina Fusco
Dr. Francesca Fanelli
Prof. Dr. Fernando Perez-Rodriguez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • probiotic bacteria
  • opportunistic pathogenic bacteria
  • dairy products
  • food omics
  • food safety
  • genomics
  • food quality
  • microbial risk assessment
  • sampling plan
  • food fermentation
  • microbial dynamics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Autochthonous and Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria Employed for Production of “Advanced Traditional Cheeses”
Foods 2019, 8(9), 412; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/foods8090412 - 13 Sep 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1597
Abstract
Microbial characterization of two Italian traditional cheeses, Giuncata and Caciotta Leccese, was carried out, with the aim to isolate autochthonous bacterial strains to be used as starters to improve and standardize the quality of these cheeses. More than 400 bacterial isolates were found, [...] Read more.
Microbial characterization of two Italian traditional cheeses, Giuncata and Caciotta Leccese, was carried out, with the aim to isolate autochthonous bacterial strains to be used as starters to improve and standardize the quality of these cheeses. More than 400 bacterial isolates were found, using PCR-based identification, to belong to 12 species of the Streptococcus, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, and Leuconostoc genera. The dominant strains were screened for antagonistic activity against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria and exopolysaccharide production, acidification, and proteolytic activity. Since Streptococcus macedonicus was found to be the most prevalent lactic acid bacteria species present in milk and in both types of cheese, the best performing strain of this species was successfully used, alone or in combination with a selected autochthonous Lactococcus lactis strain, in pilot-scale productions of Giuncata and Caciotta Leccese cheeses, respectively. The combined inoculums of selected autochthonous strains positively influenced the sensory characteristics of both Giuncata and Caciotta cheeses. Finally, the selected autochthonous cultures were enriched with a potentially probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain and successfully used in pilot-scale productions of these traditional cheeses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the use of an autochthonous S. macedonicus strain as a starter for the production of cheeses with added probiotics. In addition, the identification of the probiotic strain in the feces of healthy volunteers fed with the advanced traditional cheese proved its effectiveness as a carrier for the delivery of probiotics to the human body. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Safety and Quality of Dairy Foods)
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Review

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Review
Antibiotic Resistant Pseudomonas Spp. Spoilers in Fresh Dairy Products: An Underestimated Risk and the Control Strategies
Foods 2019, 8(9), 372; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/foods8090372 - 01 Sep 2019
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2776
Abstract
Microbial multidrug resistance (MDR) is a growing threat to public health mostly because it makes the fight against microorganisms that cause lethal infections ever less effective. Thus, the surveillance on MDR microorganisms has recently been strengthened, taking into account the control of antibiotic [...] Read more.
Microbial multidrug resistance (MDR) is a growing threat to public health mostly because it makes the fight against microorganisms that cause lethal infections ever less effective. Thus, the surveillance on MDR microorganisms has recently been strengthened, taking into account the control of antibiotic abuse as well as the mechanisms underlying the transfer of antibiotic genes (ARGs) among microbiota naturally occurring in the environment. Indeed, ARGs are not only confined to pathogenic bacteria, whose diffusion in the clinical field has aroused serious concerns, but are widespread in saprophytic bacterial communities such as those dominating the food industry. In particular, fresh dairy products can be considered a reservoir of Pseudomonas spp. resistome, potentially transmittable to consumers. Milk and fresh dairy cheeses products represent one of a few “hubs” where commensal or opportunistic pseudomonads frequently cohabit together with food microbiota and hazard pathogens even across their manufacturing processes. Pseudomonas spp., widely studied for food spoilage effects, are instead underestimated for their possible impact on human health. Recent evidences have highlighted that non-pathogenic pseudomonads strains (P. fluorescens, P. putida) are associated with some human diseases, but are still poorly considered in comparison to the pathogen P. aeruginosa. In addition, the presence of ARGs, that can be acquired and transmitted by horizontal genetic transfer, further increases their risk and the need to be deeper investigated. Therefore, this review, starting from the general aspects related to the physiological traits of these spoilage microorganisms from fresh dairy products, aims to shed light on the resistome of cheese-related pseudomonads and their genomic background, current methods and advances in the prediction tools for MDR detection based on genomic sequences, possible implications for human health, and the affordable strategies to counteract MDR spread. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Safety and Quality of Dairy Foods)
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