Special Issue "Detection, Control, Risk Assessment, and Prevention of Foodborne Microorganisms"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 26 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fernando Pérez-Rodríguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence (ceiA3), University of Cordoba, 14014 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: food microbiology and safety; predictive microbiology; food biopreservation; molecular microbiology; high-throughput sequencing technologies; microbial risk assessment of foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Arícia Possas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence (ceiA3), University of Cordoba, 14014 Córdoba, Spain
Interests: food safety; food hygiene; predictive microbiology; microbial risk assessment; modelling; emerging technologies; biopreservation; antimicrobial resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite the efforts made by governments and industry in recent decades, enteric foodborne diseases continue being a public health problem worldwide, significantly contributing to the total disease and mortality burden. According to The European Union One Health 2019 Zoonoses Report, the incidence of Campylobacter and Salmonella illness cases in humans remained stable, while Escherichia coli (STEC) infection cases increased from 2015 to 2019. Recent changes in consumer behavior, global commerce, food processing technologies, and population aging are driving the current foodborne disease emergences. In a new era of food safety, underpinned by a risk-based approach, omics data and quantitative tools are the most promising assets to combat enteric foodborne diseases. This Special Issue is seeking original manuscripts covering novel approaches for the detection, control, and prevention of enteric foodborne microorganisms. Papers combining quantitative and molecular methods applied to the study of emergence and reemergence foodborne pathogens are particularly welcome. We also invite works that deploy a quantitative risk assessment approach, based on computational tools, to examine existing microbial food safety problems in more depth.

Dr. Fernando Pérez-Rodríguez
Dr. Arícia Possas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • predictive microbiology
  • quantitative microbial risk assessment
  • next generation sequencing
  • food hygiene
  • food inspection
  • foodborne outbreaks
  • foodborne viruses
  • mycotoxins
  • foodborne bacteria
  • epidemiology
  • risk analysis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Developing Qualitative Plasmid DNA Reference Materials to Detect Mechanisms of Quinolone and Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens
Foods 2022, 11(2), 154; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/foods11020154 - 07 Jan 2022
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to develop homogeneous and stable plasmid DNA reference materials for detecting the mechanisms of resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones in foodborne pathogens. The DNA fragments of 11 target genes associated with quinolone and fluoroquinolone resistance were artificially [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to develop homogeneous and stable plasmid DNA reference materials for detecting the mechanisms of resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones in foodborne pathogens. The DNA fragments of 11 target genes associated with quinolone and fluoroquinolone resistance were artificially synthesized, inserted into plasmid vectors, and transferred into recipient cells. PCR and sequencing of DNA were performed to assess the genetic stability of the target DNA in recombinant Escherichia coli DH5α cells during subculturing for 15 generations. The limit of detection (LOD) of the target DNA was determined using PCR and real-time qualitative PCR (qPCR). The homogeneity and storage stability of plasmid DNA reference materials were evaluated in terms of plasmid DNA quantity, PCR-measured gene expression, and qPCR threshold cycle. All 11 target DNAs were successfully synthesized and inserted into vectors to obtain recombinant plasmids. No nucleotide mutations were identified in the target DNA being stably inherited and detectable in the corresponding plasmids during subculturing of recombinant strains. When the target DNA was assessed using PCR and qPCR, the LOD was ≤1.77 × 105 and 3.26 × 104 copies/μL, respectively. Further, when the reference materials were stored at 37 °C for 13 days, 4 °C for 90 days, and −20 °C for 300 days, each target DNA was detectable by PCR, and no mutations were found. Although the threshold cycle values of qPCR varied with storage time, they were above the LOD, and no significant differences were found in the quantity of each plasmid DNA at different timepoints. Further, the homogeneity and stability of the materials were highly consistent with the requirements of standard reference materials. To summarize, considering that our plasmid DNA reference materials conformed to standard requirements, they can be used to detect the mechanisms of quinolone and fluoroquinolone resistance in foodborne pathogens. Full article
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