Special Issue "Foods: 10th Anniversary"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Joana S. Amaral
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CIMO, Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, Bragança, Portugal
Interests: food authenticity; food chemistry; molecular biology approaches applied to food authentication and GMO detection; plant food supplements; bioactive compounds; antioxidant activity; antimicrobial activity; chromatography; development of analytical methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Derek V. Byrne
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Food Quality Perception and Society, iSenseLab, Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Agro Food Park 48, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark
Interests: sensory science; consumer science; food and beverage product quality; nutrition and eating; multisensory effects; crossmodal interactions; sensory methods; food uniqueness
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Theodoros Varzakas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Peloponnese, 24100 Antikalamos, Kalamata, Greece
Interests: food technology; food engineering; food safety; food quality; extra virgin olive oil; mycotoxins, fermented foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Esther Sendra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
AgroFood Technology Department, Escuela Politécnica Superior de Orihuela, Miguel Hernández University, Orihuela, Spain
Interests: dairy foods; functional dairy products: probiotics, prebiotics and fibers; effect of animal feeding on milk quality and properties; foods of animal origin; quality and product development and improvement; fatty acid analysis of foods; gas chromatography
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Benu P. Adhikari
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
Interests: food emulsions; structure-function in foods; biodegradable packaging; food engineering; micro/nano encapsulation; food powders/food drying
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2021, we will celebrate the tenth volume of the journal Foods (ISSN 2304-8158), and we would be happy if you join us on this wonderful occasion.

The first volume of Foods was launched in 2012. Since its launch in 2012, the journal has established an excellent reputation as demonstrated by the rapid increase in its Impact Factor. Over the decade that has passed since the first issue, the journal has achieved a remarkable increase in the number of papers submitted to it and the papers published. Importantly for authors and publishers, this growth has been accompanied by a significant increase in citations.

The considerable success of the journal would not have been possible without the work of the journal’s professional staff, the oversight of its editors, and the quality of the authors who have chosen to publish with us. To continue this story of success and to provde authors with a journal which is recognised internationally for its quality, the publishers wish to mark this anniversary and to thank all those involved in the journal’s achievments at all levels by producing a prestigous Special Issue.

Therefore, to mark this significant milestone, a Special Issue entitled “Foods: 10th Anniversary” is being launched. This Special Issue will include high-quality papers which fall under the broad scope of the Foods Journal’s remit. We thus would like to invite you to contribute an original research paper or a comprehensive review article on a trendy or hot topic for peer-review and possible publication.

At the same time, we are pleased to announce that a “Best Paper Award” will be offered for entries submitted to the Special Issue. For more details about the award, please visit https://0-www-mdpi-com.brum.beds.ac.uk/journal/foods/awards.pdf/0/pdf_169_2020_4_award.pdf.

Prof. Dr. Arun K. Bhunia
Prof. Dr. Joana S. Amaral
Prof. Dr. Derek V. Byrne
Prof. Dr. Theodoros Varzakas
Dr. Esther Sendra
Prof. Dr. Benu P. Adhikari
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Influence of Transglutaminase Crosslinking on Casein Protein Fractionation during Low Temperature Microfiltration
Foods 2021, 10(12), 3146; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/foods10123146 - 18 Dec 2021
Viewed by 571
Abstract
Low temperature microfiltration (MF) is applied in dairy processing to achieve higher protein and microbiological quality ingredients and to support ingredient innovation; however, low temperature reduces hydrophobic interactions between casein proteins and increases the solubility of colloidal calcium phosphate, promoting reversible dissociation of [...] Read more.
Low temperature microfiltration (MF) is applied in dairy processing to achieve higher protein and microbiological quality ingredients and to support ingredient innovation; however, low temperature reduces hydrophobic interactions between casein proteins and increases the solubility of colloidal calcium phosphate, promoting reversible dissociation of micellar β-casein into the serum phase, and thus into permeate, during MF. Crosslinking of casein proteins using transglutaminase was studied as an approach to reduce the permeation of casein monomers, which typically results in reduced yield of protein in the retentate fraction. Two treatments (a) 5 °C/24 h (TA) and (b) 40 °C/90 min (TB), were applied to the feed before filtration at 5 °C, with a 0.1 µm membrane. Flux was high for TA treatment possibly due to the stabilising effect of transglutaminase on casein micelles. It is likely that formation of isopeptide bonds within and on the surface of micelles results in the micelles being less readily available for protein-protein and protein–membrane interactions, resulting in less resistance to membrane pores and flow passage, thereby conferring higher permeate flux. The results also showed that permeation of casein monomers into the permeate was significantly reduced after both enzymatic treatments as compared to control feed due to the reduced molecular mobility of soluble casein, mainly β-casein, caused by transglutaminase crosslinking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foods: 10th Anniversary)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Intention to Purchase Milk Packaged in Biodegradable Packaging: Evidence from Italian Consumers
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2068; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/foods10092068 - 02 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 764
Abstract
The dairy industry generates large volumes of liquid waste that can be used to produce biopolymers, potentially employable for the creation of milk biodegradable bottles. In that regard, this paper aims to explore the consumers’ intention to purchase sustainable packages, as well as [...] Read more.
The dairy industry generates large volumes of liquid waste that can be used to produce biopolymers, potentially employable for the creation of milk biodegradable bottles. In that regard, this paper aims to explore the consumers’ intention to purchase sustainable packages, as well as to assess the willingness to pay for it considering renewable packages made using organic waste feedstocks from the dairy industry (e.g., whey) and plant-based material (e.g., corn, sugarcane, etc.). To reach the stated objectives, we collected individual-level information (e.g., age, gender, education, income) from a convenient sample of 260 Italian consumers and a modified version of the Theory of Planned Behavior estimated using a structural equation model. Findings show that attitudes and perceived behavioral control are the most important drivers of the consumers’ intention to purchase sustainable packages. Finally, statistics show that respondents slightly prefer to purchase products packaged using plant-based biodegradable material, as well as most of the respondents show a low willingness to pay for milk offered in biodegradable packaging, regardless of the raw material used. Then, policymakers and companies should invest in educational/informational campaigns pointing out the beneficial effects on the environment from the purchase of foods in sustainable packaging. This may potentially increase the consumers’ intention to purchase, as well as their willingness to pay for plant-based and dairy whey-based packages by increasing the sustainability of the dairy supply chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foods: 10th Anniversary)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Evaluation of the Ability of Nutri-Score to Discriminate the Nutritional Quality of Prepacked Foods Using a Sale-Weighting Approach
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1689; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/foods10081689 - 22 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1107
Abstract
The implementation of mandatory front-of-pack nutrition labelling is currently being discussed in the European Union (EU). The Nutri-Score (NS) was developed in France to empower consumers to make informed and healthier food choices. Based on strong evidence of its efficacy in supporting healthy [...] Read more.
The implementation of mandatory front-of-pack nutrition labelling is currently being discussed in the European Union (EU). The Nutri-Score (NS) was developed in France to empower consumers to make informed and healthier food choices. Based on strong evidence of its efficacy in supporting healthy choices, it has already been implemented for voluntary use in some EU member states, making it relevant to developing a harmonised EU scheme. This study aimed to evaluate the NS’s discriminating ability on products available in the food supply and compare it with Slovenian national nutritional recommendations based on an adapted WHO Europe (WHOE) profile. The innovative approach of the study is that we used sale-weighting to address the public health importance of available foods, with consideration of market share. We profiled 15,822 products available in the Slovenian food supply in 2017. The NS had a high ability to discriminate food products based on nutritional composition. Products that are generally encouraged in dietary recommendations (fruits, vegetables, cereals) had, in most cases, better NS grades than less favourable products (confectionery, snack foods, added fats), which is also in line with the national nutrition policy programme. The discriminating ability of the model was also shown within food (sub)categories (e.g., plain and flavoured yoghurt). Sale-weighting showed that offerings do not always reflect sales. Major differences between offerings and sales were observed for beverages, dairy, fruits/vegetables, and edible oils/emulsions. Additionally, sale-weighted distribution tended towards less favourable nutritional composition, particularly in categories with overall smaller offerings of products with favourable composition. The NS showed moderate agreement with the WHOE profile (κ = 0.57); differences were particularly observed in flavoured yoghurts, juices, cooking oils, and cheeses. Modelling the operation of the NS with representative real-life food samples provided insight valuable for developing and implementing harmonised mandatory front-of-pack nutrition labelling in Europe. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foods: 10th Anniversary)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop