Special Issue "Carbon and Water Cycles in Coastal Forests under Climate Change and Variability"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. John King
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
Interests: carbon and water cycling; tree physiology; genetics; drought stress and sea-level rise; productivity and sustainability of short-rotation woody cropping systems for bioenergy
Dr. Ge Sun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center, US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
Interests: forest hydrology; carbon and water fluxes; watershed hydrology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Maricar Aguilos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
Interests: atmospheric carbon measurement; biometeorology; biogeochemistry; hydrology; carbon and water fluxes; drought; flooding; sustainability science; ecology; silviculture; forestry; forest disturbances
Dr. Ning Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center, USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Research Triangle, NC, USA
Interests: ecohydrology; modeling; water and carbon cycling; ecosystem service

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As coastal regions face extensive development, the role of coastal forests in providing ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration, provisioning of clean water, mitigating flooding and erosion, and providing wildlife habitats and recreation, is becoming increasingly important. Climate change and the variability associated with hurricanes, sea-level rise, drought, fire, and urbanization all threaten coastal forest function. Understanding how water and carbon cycles in coastal forests respond to interacting chronic and episodic stressors is essential to the sustainable management of these crucial forest resources.

This Special Issue focuses on ecosystem carbon and water cycles in the coastal forests in the southeastern United States and globally. We solicit studies on the following topics:

  • carbon, water, and energy interactions in coastal forests;
  • effects of episodic climate disturbances (e.g., hurricanes, droughts, wildfire) on water and carbon cycles and forest functions and services at multiple scales; and
  • effects of chronic climate stressors (sea-level rise, increasing temperature, changes in hydrology, salinization, etc.) on water and carbon cycles at the ocean–land interface and beyond.

Prof. Dr. John King
Dr. Ge Sun
Dr. Maricar Aguilos
Dr. Ning Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • climate variability
  • drought
  • hurricanes
  • forests
  • carbon
  • hydrology
  • sea-level rise

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Ecosystem Productivity and Evapotranspiration Are Tightly Coupled in Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.) Plantations along the Coastal Plain of the Southeastern U.S.
Forests 2021, 12(8), 1123; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/f12081123 - 22 Aug 2021
Viewed by 642
Abstract
Forest water use efficiency (WUE), the ratio of gross primary productivity (GPP) to evapotranspiration (ET), is an important variable to understand the coupling between water and carbon cycles, and to assess resource use, ecosystem resilience, and commodity production. Here, we determined WUE for [...] Read more.
Forest water use efficiency (WUE), the ratio of gross primary productivity (GPP) to evapotranspiration (ET), is an important variable to understand the coupling between water and carbon cycles, and to assess resource use, ecosystem resilience, and commodity production. Here, we determined WUE for managed loblolly pine plantations over the course of a rotation on the coastal plain of North Carolina in the eastern U.S. We found that the forest annual GPP, ET, and WUE increased until age ten, which stabilized thereafter. WUE varied annually (2–44%), being higher at young plantation (YP, 3.12 ± 1.20 g C kg−1 H2O d−1) compared to a mature plantation (MP, 2.92 ± 0.45 g C kg−1 H2O d−1), with no distinct seasonal patterns. Stand age was strongly correlated with ET (R2 = 0.71) and GPP (R2 = 0.64). ET and GPP were tightly coupled (R2 = 0.86). Radiation and air temperature significantly affected GPP and ET (R2 = 0.71 − R2 = 0.82) at a monthly scale, but not WUE. Drought affected WUE (R2 = 0.35) more than ET (R2 = 0.25) or GPP (R2 = 0.07). A drought enhanced GPP in MP (19%) and YP (11%), but reduced ET 7% and 19% in MP and YP, respectively, resulting in a higher WUE (27–32%). Minor seasonal and interannual variation in forest WUE of MP (age > 10) suggested that forest functioning became stable as stands matured. We conclude that carbon and water cycles in loblolly pine plantations are tightly coupled, with different characteristics in different ages and hydrologic regimes. A stable WUE suggests that the pine ecosystem productivity can be readily predicted from ET and vice versa. The tradeoffs between water and carbon cycling should be recognized in forest management to achieve multiple ecosystem services (i.e., water supply and carbon sequestration). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Three proposed manuscripts

  1. Aguilos et al. Water use efficiency of intensively managed forests in the SE US
  2. McNulty, S. et al. Effects of hurricanes on carbon and water cycling in the SE US
  3. He, K. et al. Impacts of sea level rise on forested wetland degradation in North Carolina, US
Back to TopTop