Special Issue "Plant-Soil Interactions under Abiotic or Biotic Stresses"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Soil".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 7 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Zuoqiang Yuan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China
Interests: forest ecology; biodiversity and ecosystem functioning
Dr. Guigang Lin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China
Interests: mycorrhizal ecology; soil biogeochemistry
Dr. Cristina Aponte
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dept Forest & Ecosystem Sci, Melbourne Sch Land & Environment, Univ Melbourne, Richmond, VIC 3121, Australia
Interests: biogeochemistry (nutrient cycling, nutrient stoichiometry, litter decomposition and nutrient release); forest ecology (plant and soil interactions, functional traits, feedback processes); soil ecology (soil microbial biomass, mycorrhizal fungal communities, molecular techniques); soil seed bank ecology (characterization and distribution of seedbank species)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue intends to gather the latest studies on plant-soil interactions under a broad range of biotic or abiotic stresses in forest ecosystems, aiming to address and further improve our knowledge of this interdisciplinary topic.

Plant–soil interactions describe a wide range of physical, biological, and chemical effects exerted by soils on plant performance, growth, and reproduction, as well as reciprocal effects of plants on soil formation, physical structure, and the activities of the soil biota, which would occur over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Forests, as a vital part of the terrestrial biosphere, not only provide valuable ecosystem goods and services but also support a vast biodiversity of organisms. The complex interplay of soils and plants in forest ecosystems has commanded attention for a long time, and a deep (improved) understanding is necessary to explore the impacts of the concurrent occurrence of abiotic and biotic stresses on plant-soil interactions. We encourage studies from all fields, including experimental studies, monitoring approaches, and models, to contribute to this Special Issue in order to promote knowledge and adaptation strategies for the preservation, management, and future development of forest ecosystems. 

Dr. Zuoqiang Yuan
Dr. Guigang Lin
Dr. Cristina Aponte
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • extreme climatic events
  • disturbances
  • carbon sequestration
  • plant community composition
  • soil biota
  • plant–enemy coevolution
  • rhizosphere
  • plant-enemy coevolution
  • plant-soil feedbacks

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Effects of Different Soils on the Biomass and Photosynthesis of Rumex nepalensis in Subalpine Region of Southwestern China
Forests 2022, 13(1), 73; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/f13010073 - 05 Jan 2022
Viewed by 125
Abstract
The performance of Rumex nepalensis, an important medicinal herb, varies significantly among subalpine grasslands, shrublands and forest ecosystems in southwestern China. Plant–soil feedback is receiving increasing interest as an important driver influencing plant growth and population dynamics. However, the feedback effects of [...] Read more.
The performance of Rumex nepalensis, an important medicinal herb, varies significantly among subalpine grasslands, shrublands and forest ecosystems in southwestern China. Plant–soil feedback is receiving increasing interest as an important driver influencing plant growth and population dynamics. However, the feedback effects of soils from different ecosystems on R. nepalensis remain poorly understood. A greenhouse experiment was carried out to identify the effects of different soil sources on the photosynthesis and biomass of R. nepalensis. R. nepalensis was grown in soils collected from the rooting zones of R. nepalensis (a grassland soil, RS treatment), Hippophae rhamnoides (a shrub soil, HS treatment), and Picea asperata (a forest soil, PS treatment). The chlorophyll contents, net photosynthetic rates, and biomasses of R. nepalensis differed significantly among the three soils and followed the order of RS > HS > PS. After soil sterilization, these plant parameters followed the order of RS > PS > HS. The total biomass was 16.5 times higher in sterilized PS than in unsterilized PS, indicating that the existence of soil microbes in P. asperata forest ecosystems could strongly inhibit R. nepalensis growth. The root to shoot biomass ratio of R. nepalensis was the highest in the sterilized PS but the lowest in the unsterilized PS, which showed that soil microbes in PS could change the biomass allocation. Constrained redundancy analysis and path analysis suggested that soil microbes could impact the growth of R. nepalensis via the activities of soil extracellular enzymes (e.g., β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG)) in live soils. The soil total soluble nitrogen concentration might be the main soil factor regulating R. nepalensis performance in sterilized soils. Our findings underline the importance of the soil microbes and nitrogen to R. nepalensis performance in natural ecosystems and will help to better predict plant population dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Soil Interactions under Abiotic or Biotic Stresses)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Anthropogenic Disturbances Shape Soil Capillary and Saturated Water Retention Indirectly via Plant Functional Traits and Soil Organic Carbon in Temperate Forests
Forests 2021, 12(11), 1588; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/f12111588 - 18 Nov 2021
Viewed by 334
Abstract
Soil’s water-physical properties support essential soil water retention functions for driving water distribution and availability, which is vital for plant growth and biogeochemical cycling. However, the question concerning how tree compositions and their interactions with other abiotic factors modulate soil’s water-physical properties in [...] Read more.
Soil’s water-physical properties support essential soil water retention functions for driving water distribution and availability, which is vital for plant growth and biogeochemical cycling. However, the question concerning how tree compositions and their interactions with other abiotic factors modulate soil’s water-physical properties in disturbed forests remains poorly understood. Based on observational data from nine permanent forest sites (18,747 trees and 210 plots) in the northeast of China, where forests once undergone three different levels of anthropogenic logging disturbance, we evaluated how multiple biotic (i.e., tree diversity and functional trait composition) and abiotic (soil texture and soil organic carbon) factors influence water-physical properties (i.e., in terms of soil capillary water retention (WC) and soil saturated water retention (WS)) in temperate forests. We found that the impacts of logging disturbance on soil water-physical properties were associated with improved tree diversity, acquisitive functional traits, and SOC. These associated attributes were also positively related to WC and WS, while there was no significant effect from soil texture. Moreover, disturbance indirectly affected soil water-physical properties mainly by functional traits and SOC, as acquisitive functional traits significantly mediate the effect from disturbance on WC and SOC mediates the influence from disturbance on WS. Finally, our results emphasize the potential relationships of tree composition with SOC and soil water retention as compared with soil texture and hence suggest that plants can actively modulate their abiotic contexts after disturbance, which is meaningful for understanding forest health and resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Soil Interactions under Abiotic or Biotic Stresses)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop