Special Issue "External Validity and Choice-Process Data of Lab Measures on Social Preference Games"

A special issue of Games (ISSN 2073-4336). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Experimental Game Theory".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jan Stoop
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Erasmus University Rotterdam, Department of Applied Economics, Postbus 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Interests: behavioral and experimental economics; social preferences; cooperation; other-regarding behavior; field experiments; tournaments; external validity
Dr. Georg Granic
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Erasmus University Rotterdam, Department of Applied Economics, Postbus 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Interests: behavioral and experimental economics; behavioral game theory; voting behavior; voting methods; judgement and decision making; choice-process data

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Laboratory experiments on social preferences have a long tradition in social sciences. They have delivered many important insights into when and how people are motivated to consider the consequences of their actions on the well-being of others in the lab. Two important questions arise from this setting. First, to which extent do findings from the laboratory generalize to a more ‘realistic’ setting? Second, can we use recent advances in the measurement of choice-process data to gain new insights in the lab?

The aim of this Special Issue is to gather research from economics and related fields that studies the external validity of laboratory measures of social preferences or uses choice-process data to learn about social preferences. The definition of social preferences can be taken quite broadly, but examples are cooperation, trust, and altruism.

For external validity, we are particularly interested in studies that compare lab measures to field measures, in one way or another. For the choice-process part, we welcome any study on process measurements in lab or field (for example, using process data to discriminate among competing theories or to estimate social preferences more accurately.)

We welcome submissions that report null results, if design and setting would suggest strong effects otherwise. Please use Bayesian techniques in that case, so that we learn about the likeliness of the null.

Dr. Jan Stoop
Guest Editor

Dr. Georg Granic
co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Games is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • social preference games
  • cooperation games
  • trust games
  • external validity of lab games
  • choice process data
  • field experiments

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Trusting the Trust Game: An External Validity Analysis with a UK Representative Sample
Games 2021, 12(3), 66; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/g12030066 - 03 Sep 2021
Viewed by 827
Abstract
Using a nationally representative sample of 1052 respondents from the United Kingdom, we systematically tested the associations between the experimental trust game and a range of popular self-reported measures for trust, such as the General Social Survey (GSS) and the Rosenberg scale for [...] Read more.
Using a nationally representative sample of 1052 respondents from the United Kingdom, we systematically tested the associations between the experimental trust game and a range of popular self-reported measures for trust, such as the General Social Survey (GSS) and the Rosenberg scale for self-reported trust. We find that, in our UK representative sample, the experimental trust game significantly and positively predicts generalised self-reported trust in the GSS. This association is robust across a number of alternative empirical specifications, which account for multiple hypotheses corrections and control for other social preferences as measured by the dictator game and the public good game, as well as for a broad range of individual characteristics, such as gender, age, education, and personal income. We discuss how these results generalise to nationally representative samples from six other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries (France, Germany, Italy, Korea, Slovenia, and the US). Full article
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