Special Issue "Complete Rectal Prolapse: Etiopathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment"

A special issue of Gastroenterology Insights (ISSN 2036-7422). This special issue belongs to the section "Gastrointestinal Disease".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gaetano Gallo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dr. Ugo Grossi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IV Surgery Unit, Treviso Regional Hospital, University of Padua, 35122 Padua, Italy
Interests: liver transplantation; surgical oncology; cirrhosis; laparoscopic surgery; hepatocellular carcinoma; liver; liver surgery; gastrointestinal diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Atsushi Sakuraba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Inflammatory bowel disease center, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
Interests: inflammatory bowel disease; Crohn's disease; ulcerative colitis; microscopic colitis; colon cancer; gastrointestinal endoscopy; fecal transplant; clinical trials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

External rectal prolapse, rectal procidentia, or “complete” rectal prolapse (CRP), can be defined as a circumferential, full-thickness intussusception of the rectal wall which protrudes outside the anal canal. It occurs at the extremes of age with an incidence of approximately 2.5 per 100,000 inhabitants and a clear predominance among elderly women.

The precise aetiology of rectal prolapse is not completely understood, but it seems to be multifactorial and includes weakness of the pelvic floor, chronic constipation, multiple pregnancies, previous pelvic surgery, and a deep pouch of Douglas.

The most common symptom is protrusion of rectum following defecation, together with mucous discharge, and rectal bleeding. Constipation, faecal incontinence, and obstructive defecation syndrome (ODS) are also frequently seen.

The diagnosis is often clinical and anoperineal examination, including proctoscopy, is mandatory. More recently, endoanal ultrasound, MRI, anorectal manometry, defecography, and neurophysiological testing are also being utilized to assess the severity of the disease.

Surgical treatments are divided into abdominal and perineal approach, but minimally invasive procedures (laparoscopic or robotic approaches) are found to be safe and effective when performed by experienced surgeons. However, the available evidence does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions about the best treatment for CRP.

Furthermore, despite anatomical correction, patients frequently complain of persisting pelvic floor symptoms and recurrences. For this reason, the management of CRP is challenging for all coloproctologists specializing in anatomo-functional disorders of the pelvic floor.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a series of state-of-the-art manuscripts, including both original contributions and review articles, in order to reach a complete understanding of the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CRP.

Dr. Gaetano Gallo
Dr. Ugo Grossi
Dr. Atsushi Sakuraba
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gastroenterology Insights is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rectal prolapse
  • perineal approach
  • abdominal approach
  • minimally invasive treatment
  • laparoscopic ventral rectopexy
  • Delorme
  • Altemeier
  • perineal stapler resection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
An Age-Old Problem: The Surgical Treatment of Complete Rectal Prolapse
Gastroenterol. Insights 2021, 12(3), 347-349; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gastroent12030032 - 19 Aug 2021
Viewed by 593
Abstract
Dear Editor, [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Complete Rectal Prolapse: Etiopathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment)

Review

Jump to: Editorial

Review
Surgical Techniques for Rectal Prolapse
Gastroenterol. Insights 2021, 12(3), 310-318; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gastroent12030028 - 01 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1558
Abstract
Complete rectal prolapse or rectal procidentia is a debilitating disease that presents with fecal incontinence, constipation, and rectal discharge. Definitive surgical techniques described for this disease include perineal procedures such as mucosectomy and rectosigmoidectomy, and abdominal procedures such as rectopexy with or without [...] Read more.
Complete rectal prolapse or rectal procidentia is a debilitating disease that presents with fecal incontinence, constipation, and rectal discharge. Definitive surgical techniques described for this disease include perineal procedures such as mucosectomy and rectosigmoidectomy, and abdominal procedures such as rectopexy with or without mesh and concomitant resection. The debate over these techniques regarding the lowest recurrence and morbidity rates, and the best functional outcomes for constipation or incontinence, has been going on for decades. The heterogeneity of available studies does not allow us to draw firm conclusions. This article aims to review the surgical techniques for complete rectal prolapse based on the current evidence base regarding surgical and functional outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Complete Rectal Prolapse: Etiopathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment)
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