Special Issue "Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer"

A special issue of Gastrointestinal Disorders (ISSN 2624-5647).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Matjaz Rokavec
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Experimental and Molecular Pathology, Institute of Pathology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany
Interests: colorectal cancer; therapeutic targets; microRNA; EMT; p53; bioinformatics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer mortality, responsible for about 900,000 deaths worldwide annualy. The 5-year survival rate of CRC patients is ~64%, but drops to ~12% for metastatic CRC. Treatment consists of surgery, and is combined with radio-, chemo- and targeted therapy for advanced CRCs. Targeted therapy is directed against proteins that drive tumor growth and progression. The advantage of targeted treatment is its ability to block the growth and spread of cancer cells while limiting damage to healthy cells. Today, therapies targeting EGFR and VEGF, as well as the immune-checkpoints have been approved for CRC treatment, while many more are in clinical or pre-clinical development. This special issue will focus on the identification and validation of therapeutic targets for CRC as well as on the development and management of therapeutic approaches for their inhibition. In addition, inovative therapeutic approaches to target currently undrugable proteins, such as synthetic lethality, aptamers, or targeted protein degradation will be discussed.

Dr. Matjaz Rokavec
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gastrointestinal Disorders is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Therapeutic targets
  • Targeted therapy
  • Precision oncology
  • Personalized treatment
  • Metastasis
  • EGFR
  • VEGF
  • Synthetic lethality
  • Small molecules
  • Biologics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Tribbles Gene Expression Profiles in Colorectal Cancer
Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3(4), 218-236; https://doi.org/10.3390/gidisord3040021 - 09 Nov 2021
Viewed by 552
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the world. Therefore, the identification of novel druggable targets is urgently needed. Tribbles proteins belong to a pseudokinase family, previously recognized in CRC [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the world. Therefore, the identification of novel druggable targets is urgently needed. Tribbles proteins belong to a pseudokinase family, previously recognized in CRC as oncogenes and potential therapeutic targets. Here, we analyzed the expression of TRIB1, TRIB2, and TRIB3 simultaneously in 33 data sets from CRC based on available GEO profiles. We show that all three Tribbles genes are overrepresented in CRC cell lines and primary tumors, though depending on specific features of the CRC samples. Higher expression of TRIB2 in the tumor microenvironment and TRIB3 overexpression in an early stage of CRC development, unveil a potential and unexplored role for these proteins in the context of CRC. Differential Tribbles expression was also explored in diverse cellular experimental conditions where either genetic or pharmacological approaches were used, providing novel hints for future research. This comprehensive bioinformatic analysis provides new insights into Tribbles gene expression and transcript regulation in CRC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer)
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Review

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Review
Surveillance of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Patients
Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3(2), 84-95; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3020009 - 25 May 2021
Viewed by 1250
Abstract
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the commonest inherited genetic disorder in Caucasians due to a mutation in the gene CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator), and it should be considered as an Inherited Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Syndrome. In the United States, physicians of CF [...] Read more.
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the commonest inherited genetic disorder in Caucasians due to a mutation in the gene CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator), and it should be considered as an Inherited Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Syndrome. In the United States, physicians of CF Foundation established the “Developing Innovative Gastroenterology Speciality Training Program” to increase the research on CF in gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary diseases. The risk to develop a CRC is 5–10 times higher in CF patients than in the general population and even greater in CF patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy due to organ transplantation (30-fold increased risk relative to the general population). Colonoscopy should be considered the best screening for CRC in CF patients. The screening colonoscopy should be started at the age of 40 in CF patients and, if negative, a new colonoscopy should be performed every 5 years and every 3 years if adenomas are detected. For transplanted CF patients, the screening colonoscopy could be started at the age of 35, in transplanted patients at the age of 30 and, if before, at the age of 30. CF transplanted patients, between the age of 35 and 55, must repeat colonoscopy every 3 years. Our review draws attention towards the clinically relevant development of CRC in CF patients, and it may pave the way for further screenings and studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer)
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