Special Issue "New Advances in Research on the Role of Abscisic Acid in Plant Development"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sonia Gazzarrini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological Sciences and Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
Prof. Dr. Eiji Nambara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates various aspects of plant growth and development in addition to its well-known role in abiotic stress responses. ABA is primarily synthesized in the vasculature and transported to various organs, where it can either promote or inhibit growth and development depending on its concentration and the tissue type. ABA’s core signaling pathway, which has been well studied in angiosperms, has evolved with the colonization of terrestrial environments by plants. Although numerous studies have furthered our understanding of ABA biosynthesis and signaling, the spatiotemporal distribution of ABA during plant development, cell and tissue-specific responses to ABA, and the evolution of the ABA signaling pathway are less understood.

This Special Issue seeks submissions that advance our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of ABA regulation of plant development, including seed development and germination, seed and bud dormancy, root and shoot growth, plant reproduction, and fruit development. Contributions that describe new advances in the evolution of the ABA signaling pathway, the spatiotemporal localization of ABA during plant development using reporters and genetically encoded biosensors, and mapping cellular responses to ABA by single-cell and tissue-type-specific transcriptomics and other technologies are welcome. 

Dr. Sonia Gazzarrini
Prof. Eiji Nambara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • abscisic acid signaling evolution
  • transcriptional responses to ABA signaling
  • ABA in plant development
  • cell-specific responses
  • tissue-specific responses

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Arabidopsis NPF4.6 and NPF5.1 Control Leaf Stomatal Aperture by Regulating Abscisic Acid Transport
Genes 2021, 12(6), 885; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12060885 - 08 Jun 2021
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Abstract
The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is actively synthesized in vascular tissues and transported to guard cells to promote stomatal closure. Although several transmembrane ABA transporters have been identified, how the movement of ABA within plants is regulated is not fully understood. In [...] Read more.
The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is actively synthesized in vascular tissues and transported to guard cells to promote stomatal closure. Although several transmembrane ABA transporters have been identified, how the movement of ABA within plants is regulated is not fully understood. In this study, we determined that Arabidopsis NPF4.6, previously identified as an ABA transporter expressed in vascular tissues, is also present in guard cells and positively regulates stomatal closure in leaves. We also found that mutants defective in NPF5.1 had a higher leaf surface temperature compared to the wild type. Additionally, NPF5.1 mediated cellular ABA uptake when expressed in a heterologous yeast system. Promoter activities of NPF5.1 were detected in several leaf cell types. Taken together, these observations indicate that NPF5.1 negatively regulates stomatal closure by regulating the amount of ABA that can be transported from vascular tissues to guard cells. Full article
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Review

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Review
ABA and Bud Dormancy in Perennials: Current Knowledge and Future Perspective
Genes 2021, 12(10), 1635; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12101635 (registering DOI) - 18 Oct 2021
Abstract
Bud dormancy is an evolved trait that confers adaptation to harsh environments, and affects flower differentiation, crop yield and vegetative growth in perennials. ABA is a stress hormone and a major regulator of dormancy. Although the physiology of bud dormancy is complex, several [...] Read more.
Bud dormancy is an evolved trait that confers adaptation to harsh environments, and affects flower differentiation, crop yield and vegetative growth in perennials. ABA is a stress hormone and a major regulator of dormancy. Although the physiology of bud dormancy is complex, several advancements have been achieved in this field recently by using genetics, omics and bioinformatics methods. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role of ABA and environmental signals, as well as the interplay of other hormones and sucrose, in the regulation of this process. We also discuss emerging potential mechanisms in this physiological process, including epigenetic regulation. Full article
Review
Roles of Glutathione in Mediating Abscisic Acid Signaling and Its Regulation of Seed Dormancy and Drought Tolerance
Genes 2021, 12(10), 1620; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12101620 - 14 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Plant growth and development and interactions with the environment are regulated by phytohormones and other signaling molecules. During their evolution, plants have developed strategies for efficient signal perception and for the activation of signal transduction cascades to maintain proper growth and development, in [...] Read more.
Plant growth and development and interactions with the environment are regulated by phytohormones and other signaling molecules. During their evolution, plants have developed strategies for efficient signal perception and for the activation of signal transduction cascades to maintain proper growth and development, in particular under adverse environmental conditions. Abscisic acid (ABA) is one of the phytohormones known to regulate plant developmental events and tolerance to environmental stresses. The role of ABA is mediated by both its accumulated level, which is regulated by its biosynthesis and catabolism, and signaling, all of which are influenced by complex regulatory mechanisms. Under stress conditions, plants employ enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant strategies to scavenge excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitigate the negative effects of oxidative stress. Glutathione (GSH) is one of the main antioxidant molecules playing a critical role in plant survival under stress conditions through the detoxification of excess ROS, maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and regulating protein functions. GSH has recently emerged as an important signaling molecule regulating ABA signal transduction and associated developmental events, and response to stressors. This review highlights the current knowledge on the interplay between ABA and GSH in regulating seed dormancy, germination, stomatal closure and tolerance to drought. Full article
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