Special Issue "Advances in Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (CRC)"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Revital Kariv
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cancer Biology Research Center, Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box 39040, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
Interests: hereditary GI cancers; colorectal cancer; next-generation sequencing; whole exome analysis; APC gene

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the Guest Editor of the Special Issue “Advances in the Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (CRC)” by the journal Genes, I am delighted to invite you to contribute an original research or review article that addresses this evolving topic.

Colorectal cancer genetics research has taken a sharp turn since the era of next-generation sequencing (NGS), with an incredible volume of information and the discovery of new genetic alterations related to colorectal neoplasia, risk prediction algorithms, interaction of genetics with lifestyle, and more. However, clinical practice is trying to catch up with the vast information in order to give sound screening and surveillance recommendations, predict risks, and personalize treatment.

Due to your professional interest in this topic, we would be privileged to receive a manuscript from your group related to the above topic. Papers submitted will be subjected to peer review.

I anticipate your positive response.

Sincerely,

Prof. Revital Kariv
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • colorectal cancer
  • colonic polyps
  • polyposis
  • hereditary CRC
  • lynch syndrome
  • mismatch repair
  • next generation sequencing
  • mutation
  • genetic variants
  • SNP
  • gene panel
  • whole exome and genome sequencing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
The Second Allele: A Key to Understanding the Timing of Sporadic and Hereditary Colorectal Tumorigenesis
Genes 2021, 12(10), 1515; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12101515 - 26 Sep 2021
Viewed by 381
Abstract
Our understanding of the molecular basis of colorectal neoplasia is derived from Mendelian genetics, with tumor suppressor genes contributing more to the deregulation of growth than oncogenes. In patients with hereditary syndromes, expression of one allele of a key tumor suppressor gene is [...] Read more.
Our understanding of the molecular basis of colorectal neoplasia is derived from Mendelian genetics, with tumor suppressor genes contributing more to the deregulation of growth than oncogenes. In patients with hereditary syndromes, expression of one allele of a key tumor suppressor gene is absent at birth. The loss of the expression of the second allele precipitates tumorigenesis. However, there are multiple ways in which the expression of the second allele of a tumor suppressor gene is lost. Here, we review these ways and their possible effect on phenotype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (CRC))
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