Special Issue "Advances in Genetics of Psychiatric Disorders"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Margarita Rivera
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Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, Faculty of Pharmacy and Institute of Neurosciences, Biomedical Research Centre (CIBM), University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: psychiatric disorders; genetics; GWAS studies; comorbid physical disorders
Dr. Esther Molina
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Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences and Institute of Neurosciences, Biomedical Research Centre (CIBM), University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: psychiatric disorders; genetics; epidemiology; health sciences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Psychiatric disorders are very common and a leading cause of worldwide disability. They have significant impacts on health and major social, human rights and economic consequences in all countries around the world.

They are highly polygenic, and multifactorial disorders with both genetic and environmental factors contribute to their development. Since the beginning of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), a large number of genetic risk variants has been linked to the presence of psychiatric disorders and has provided insights into the biological pathways involved in their susceptibility. Despite the increased availability of innovative techniques and new approaches for genetic studies, the complex genetic architecture of the psychiatric disorders has not yet been fully elucidated.

Nowadays, multiple studies and research projects are being carried out worldwide on the implications of genetic aspects in the development of psychiatric disorders. All this effort could improve the diagnosis and prediction of the disorder risk and help to identify new specific drug targets, as well as enhance the prediction of individual response to drugs.

This Special Issue “Advances in Genetics of Psychiatric Disorders” in Genes will present recent advances in the study of the genetic underpinnings of different psychiatric disorders and a general overview of new challenges in this field.

Prof. Dr. Margarita Rivera
Dr. Esther Molina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Psychiatric disorders
  • Genetic variants
  • GWAS studies
  • Candidate genes studies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Common and Unique Genetic Background between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Excessive Body Weight
Genes 2021, 12(9), 1407; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12091407 - 13 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Comorbidity studies show that children with ADHD have a higher risk of being overweight and obese than healthy children. This study aimed to assess the genetic alternations that differ between and are shared by ADHD and excessive body weight (EBW). The sample consisted [...] Read more.
Comorbidity studies show that children with ADHD have a higher risk of being overweight and obese than healthy children. This study aimed to assess the genetic alternations that differ between and are shared by ADHD and excessive body weight (EBW). The sample consisted of 743 Polish children aged between 6 and 17 years. We analyzed a unique set of genes and polymorphisms selected for ADHD and/or obesity based on gene prioritization tools. Polymorphisms in the KCNIP1, SLC1A3, MTHFR, ADRA2A, and SLC6A2 genes proved to be associated with the risk of ADHD in the studied population. The COMT gene polymorphism was one that specifically increased the risk of EBW in the ADHD group. Using the whole-exome sequencing technique, we have shown that the ADHD group contains rare and protein-truncating variants in the FBXL17, DBH, MTHFR, PCDH7, RSPH3, SPTBN1, and TNRC6C genes. In turn, variants in the ADRA2A, DYNC1H1, MAP1A, SEMA6D, and ZNF536 genes were specific for ADHD with EBW. In this way, we confirmed, at the molecular level, the existence of genes specifically predisposing to EBW in ADHD patients, which are associated with the biological pathways involved in the regulation of the reward system, intestinal microbiome, and muscle metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Genetics of Psychiatric Disorders)
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Article
Genetic Variations Associated with Long-Term Treatment Response in Bipolar Depression
Genes 2021, 12(8), 1259; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12081259 - 18 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Several pharmacogenetic-based decision support tools for psychoactive medication selection are available. However, the scientific evidence of the gene-drug pairs analyzed is mainly based on pharmacogenetic studies in patients with major depression or schizophrenia, and their clinical utility is mostly assessed in major depression. [...] Read more.
Several pharmacogenetic-based decision support tools for psychoactive medication selection are available. However, the scientific evidence of the gene-drug pairs analyzed is mainly based on pharmacogenetic studies in patients with major depression or schizophrenia, and their clinical utility is mostly assessed in major depression. This study aimed at evaluating the impact of individual genes, with pharmacogenetic relevance in other psychiatric conditions, in the response to treatment in bipolar depression. Seventy-six patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder and an index major depressive episode were included in an observational retrospective study. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, and all patients were genotyped using a commercial multigene pharmacogenomic-based tool (Neuropharmagen®, AB-Biotics S.A., Barcelona, Spain). Multiple linear regression was used to identify pharmacogenetic and clinical predictors of efficacy and tolerability of medications. The pharmacogenetic variables response to serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (ABCB1) and reduced metabolism of quetiapine (CYP3A4) predicted patient response to these medications, respectively. ABCB1 was also linked to the tolerability of SNRIs. An mTOR-related multigenic predictor was also associated with a lower number of adverse effects when including switch and autolytical ideation. Our results suggest that the predictors identified could be useful to guide the pharmacological treatment in bipolar disorder. Additional clinical studies are necessary to confirm these findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Genetics of Psychiatric Disorders)
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Review

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Review
Association and Genetic Expression between Genes Involved in HPA Axis and Suicide Behavior: A Systematic Review
Genes 2021, 12(10), 1608; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12101608 - 13 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Background: Suicide behavior (SB) has been highly associated with the response to stress and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. The aim of this study was to summarize the results obtained in genetic studies that analyzed the HPA axis—stress pathway and SB through a systematic [...] Read more.
Background: Suicide behavior (SB) has been highly associated with the response to stress and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. The aim of this study was to summarize the results obtained in genetic studies that analyzed the HPA axis—stress pathway and SB through a systematic review. Methods: We performed an online search in PubMed, EBSCO, Web of Science, Scopus, and PsycoInfo databases up to May 2021. We followed the PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews. We included case-control and expression studies that provided data on mRNA expression and single-nucleotide polymorphisms of genes associated with SB. Results: A total of 21,926 individuals participated across 41 studies (not repeats); 34 studies provided data on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 21,284 participants and 11 studies reported data on mRNA expression in 1034 participants. Ten genes were identified: FKBP5, CRH, CRHBP, CRHR1, CRHR2, NR3C1, NR3C2, SKA2, MC2R, and POMC. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that key stress pathway genes are significantly associated with SB and show potential as biomarkers for SB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Genetics of Psychiatric Disorders)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. title: Exploring the Contribution to Adhd of Genes Involved in Mendelian Disorders (OMIM) Presenting with Hyperactivity and/or Inattention
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