Special Issue "Transposable Elements and Non-Traditional Model Organisms"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Population and Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. David A. Ray
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University, Box 43131, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA
Interests: transposon; mobile DNA; evolution; genomics; genome defense
Dr. Federico G. Hoffmann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology, and Plant Pathology, Box 9655, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA
Interests: transposon; mobile DNA; evolution; genomics; genome defense

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Because of their ubiquity, studies of transposable elements (TEs) are relevant to nearly all organisms. They often represent the single major recognizable genomic component. For many years, however, many of the detailed analyses of TEs have focused on model organisms such as Drosophila, maize, human, and mouse models. In the early years of genomics, this was often necessary because the tools needed to perform detailed analyses and experimental manipulations were restricted to those well-worn models. However, with the massive increase in sequencing capability, the expansion of computational capacity, and the introduction of CRISPR and other genetic manipulation techniques, the range of organisms available to TE researchers is essentially unlimited. This allows TE researchers to expand our research frontiers to the study of the entire array of biological impacts and interactions that the natural world experiences with regard to mobile DNAs, rather than restricting ourselves to a limited variety of laboratory models.

This Special Issue invites research articles, reviews, and short communications including but not limited to methods of TE discovery and analysis, examination of TE impacts including evolutionary innovation, defenses against TEs, population genomics of TEs, and novel approaches to the study of TE–genome interactions, all within the context of non-traditional model organisms.

Prof. Dr. David A. Ray
Dr. Federico G. Hoffmann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Transposon
  • Mobile DNA
  • Evolution
  • Genomics
  • Genome defense

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Suggested Absence of Horizontal Transfer of Retrotransposons between Humans and Domestic Mammal Species
Genes 2021, 12(8), 1223; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12081223 - 08 Aug 2021
Viewed by 381
Abstract
Transposable element sequences are usually vertically inherited but have also spread across taxa via horizontal transfer. Previous investigations of ancient horizontal transfer of transposons have compared consensus sequences, but this method resists detection of recent single or low copy number transfer events. The [...] Read more.
Transposable element sequences are usually vertically inherited but have also spread across taxa via horizontal transfer. Previous investigations of ancient horizontal transfer of transposons have compared consensus sequences, but this method resists detection of recent single or low copy number transfer events. The relationship between humans and domesticated animals represents an opportunity for potential horizontal transfer due to the consistent shared proximity and exposure to parasitic insects, which have been identified as plausible transfer vectors. The relatively short period of extended human–animal contact (tens of thousands of years or less) makes horizontal transfer of transposons between them unlikely. However, the availability of high-quality reference genomes allows individual element comparisons to detect low copy number events. Using pairwise all-versus-all megablast searches of the complete suite of retrotransposons of thirteen domestic animals against human, we searched a total of 27,949,823 individual TEs. Based on manual comparisons of stringently filtered BLAST search results for evidence of vertical inheritance, no plausible instances of HTT were identified. These results indicate that significant recent HTT between humans and domesticated animals has not occurred despite the close proximity, either due to the short timescale, inhospitable recipient genomes, a failure of vector activity, or other factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transposable Elements and Non-Traditional Model Organisms)
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