Special Issue "Sports or/and Special Populations: Training Physiology in Health and Sports Performance"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Factors and Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Felipe Aidar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physical Education Department, Federal University of Segipe, São Cristóvão, Sergipe 49100-000, Brazil
Interests: environmental and exercise physiology; including physiological responses; simulated and real adaptations to training as well as exercise performance for athletes and para-athletes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several factors have been identified as interfering with the success, rehabilitation, and fitness of athletes from childhood to adulthood, as well as in para-sport, and special populations, according to research. The performance and health of this population are affected by the relationships between stress, maturation, training load, and recovery. Environmental approaches aim to increase efficiency and physiological adaptations in this sense. In various situations and conditions, however, this stimulus–performance–adaptation relationship varies.

As a result, we look forward to receiving contributions related (but not limited) to the following topics: training load monitoring; stress and physiological responses during exercise or sports; recovery process after exercise; changes after stress and/or training load; physiology of training in health and sports performance.

All manuscripts will be reviewed by experts in the field by June 30, 2022.

Prof. Dr. Felipe Aidar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health promotion
  • fatigue monitoring
  • training load monitoring
  • sports
  • biological maturation
  • psychobiological changes
  • imune and edocrine responses
  • neuromuscular performance
  • adaptation to training
  • stress
  • recovery
  • fatigue
  • sleep
  • delayed onset muscle soreness
  • psychobiological changes
  • immunological responses
  • neuromuscular performance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effect of an Alternative Swimming Learning Program on Skills, Technique, Performance, and Salivary Cortisol Concentration at Primary School Ages Novice Swimmers
Healthcare 2021, 9(9), 1234; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/healthcare9091234 - 19 Sep 2021
Viewed by 573
Abstract
The playful training method shows positive effects on sports learning, thus the aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two different swimming learning programs. In an 8-week intervention with a training frequency of three times per week, 23 healthy [...] Read more.
The playful training method shows positive effects on sports learning, thus the aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two different swimming learning programs. In an 8-week intervention with a training frequency of three times per week, 23 healthy primary school-aged novice swimmers (13 boys, 10 girls) aged 9.0 ± 0.9 participated. They were split into control (CG) and alternative (AG) groups and evaluated on skills (Start, Sink), backstroke (BK) and breaststroke (BR) technique, performance (Skills time, Kicks Time), and salivary cortisol concentration. According to the results, “Start” had a greater percentage of success in AG, at the first (CG = 9.1% vs. AG = 58.3%, p = 0.027) and third (CG = 63.6% vs. AG = 100%, p = 0.037) measurement. Additionally, greater scores were found in technique for AG in both BK (p = 0.009, η2 = 0.283) and BR (p = 0.020, η2 = 0.231). Salivary cortisol concentration was decreased for both groups (p < 0.001) and greater in CG at the second measurement (p < 0.001). The alternative swimming learning program was found to be more efficient or equally effective, compared with the standardized method in-water skills, swimming technique and performance, and in salivary cortisol concentration. Full article
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Article
Are Strength Indicators and Skin Temperature Affected by the Type of Warm-Up in Paralympic Powerlifting Athletes?
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 923; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/healthcare9080923 - 22 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 593
Abstract
(1) Background: the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different types of warm-ups on the strength and skin temperature of Paralympic powerlifting athletes. (2) Methods: the participants were 15 male Paralympic powerlifting athletes. The effects of three different types of warm-up [...] Read more.
(1) Background: the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different types of warm-ups on the strength and skin temperature of Paralympic powerlifting athletes. (2) Methods: the participants were 15 male Paralympic powerlifting athletes. The effects of three different types of warm-up (without warm-up (WW), traditional warm-up (TW), or stretching warm-up (SW)) were analyzed on static and dynamic strength tests as well as in the skin temperature, which was monitored by thermal imaging. (3) Results: no differences in the dynamic and static indicators of the force were shown in relation to the different types of warm-ups. No significant differences were found in relation to peak torque (p = 0.055, F = 4.560, η2p = 0.246 medium effect), and one-repetition maximum (p = 0.139, F = 3.191, η2p = 0.186, medium effect) between the different types of warm-ups. In the thermographic analysis, there was a significant difference only in the pectoral muscle clavicular portion between the TW (33.04 ± 0.71 °C) and the WW (32.51 ± 0.74 °C) (p = 0.038). The TW method also presented slightly higher values than the SW and WW in the pectoral muscles sternal portion and the deltoid anterior portion, but with p-value > 0.05. (4) Conclusions: the types of warm-ups studied do not seem to interfere with the performance of Paralympic Powerlifting athletes. However, the thermal images showed that traditional warm-up best meets the objectives expected for this preparation phase. Full article
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Article
Cut-Off Points of Visceral Adipose Tissue Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Military Men
Healthcare 2021, 9(7), 886; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/healthcare9070886 - 14 Jul 2021
Viewed by 747
Abstract
Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) has high metabolic activity and secretes a larger number of adipokines that are related to the inflammatory process. Quantifying VAT could estimate the risk of developing Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). This study was designed to determine the VAT cut-off points [...] Read more.
Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) has high metabolic activity and secretes a larger number of adipokines that are related to the inflammatory process. Quantifying VAT could estimate the risk of developing Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). This study was designed to determine the VAT cut-off points assessed by DXA associated with MetS in military men. In total, 270 (37.5 ± 6.9 years) military men from the Brazilian Army (BA) participated in the study. Anthropometric measurements, assessment of body composition by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), hemodynamics and biochemical tests were performed. The Student’s t test, independent samples, Person’s correlation, ROC curve, Youden Index and positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were used. The MetS prevalence was 27.4%, which means that 74 (38.0 ± 7.3 years) military men had at least three risk factors of MetS present. The cutoff point of VAT with the highest balance between sensitivity (77.0%) and specificity (69.9%) was 1025.0 cm3 (1086.0 g). An area on the ROC curve was 0.801 (p < 0.000), which was very good precision. VAT ≥ 1025.0 cm3 (1086.0 g) is associated with the risk factors of MetS and is, therefore, a predictor of the disease with good indicators of sensitivity and specificity and a robust indicator of MetS. Full article
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