Special Issue "Geocomputation and Remote Sensing for Modelling in Landscape Archaeology"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Maria Danese
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CNR, Istituto di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale, Contrada Santa Loja, Tito (Potenza), Italy
Interests: geographic information science; archaeology; cultural heritage; territorial and urban planning; anthropic and natural risks
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geocomputation and remote sensing became fundamental instruments for landscape archaeology over the last few decades. Today large availability of data and efficient tools has promoted the development and application of many quantitative techniques for modelling in landscape archaeology issues. Geocomputation and remote sensing became very important also to develop Support Decision System for archaeological researches, because they are able to support the specialist in each step of the archaeological thinking, from the field survey to the creation of archaeological probabilistic maps, but also as instruments to support result validation.

However advance in knowledge about the reliability and robustness of different methods and a systematic comparison to expert-based maps, methods and interpretations are always required. In this volume contributions regarding the development and application of remote sensing and geocomputation methods (spatial analysis, machine learning, cellular automata, agent-based) for the modelling in landscape archaeology are welcome.


Dr. Maria Danese
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Remote sensing
  • GIS
  • Geocomputation
  • Machine learning
  • Cellular automata
  • Agent-based models
  • Spatial analysis
  • Landscape archaeology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Different Models, Different Outcomes? A Comparison of Approaches to Land Use Modeling in the Dutch Limes
Heritage 2021, 4(3), 2081-2104; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4030118 - 01 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Current advances in spatial simulation bring unprecedented possibilities for spatio-temporal modeling. In this paper, we focus on modeling the impact of settlement on land use in the Roman period in the Dutch river area, on the northern frontier of the Roman Empire. During [...] Read more.
Current advances in spatial simulation bring unprecedented possibilities for spatio-temporal modeling. In this paper, we focus on modeling the impact of settlement on land use in the Roman period in the Dutch river area, on the northern frontier of the Roman Empire. During this period, the area witnessed a strong population increase that put more demands on the available land to produce food, not only for the local population, but also for the soldiers stationed on the frontier and the citizens of the newly founded towns. We compare an agent-based model (ABM) of agricultural production in the region (ROMFARMS), and a model using the Past Land Use Scanner (PLUS. Both were used to estimate the effects of increased agricultural demand through simulations of food production, taking into account the available workforce and the productivity and availability of suitable land. However, how should we evaluate the model outcomes? What are the advantages and limitations of each? We discuss issues of scale, temporal resolution and model inputs, together with questions of technical implementation and validation. In this way, we aim to point the way to future researchers to implement these approaches effectively in other contexts. Full article
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Article
Late Roman Forest in the Delta of the River Po (Italy): Remote Sensing and 3D Maps Computation for Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction
Heritage 2020, 3(3), 782-795; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage3030043 - 13 Jul 2020
Viewed by 870
Abstract
Literary and historical sources provide information about Late Roman forests in the Delta of the River Po, in the district of Ferrara (Italy), between Vicus Aventiae (Voghenza), Sandalo, Gambulaga, Caput Gauri (Codigoro) and Castrum Cumiacli (Comacchio). Toponymy, archaeological excavations and geoarchaeological studies support [...] Read more.
Literary and historical sources provide information about Late Roman forests in the Delta of the River Po, in the district of Ferrara (Italy), between Vicus Aventiae (Voghenza), Sandalo, Gambulaga, Caput Gauri (Codigoro) and Castrum Cumiacli (Comacchio). Toponymy, archaeological excavations and geoarchaeological studies support the palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of this land. In this work, after a brief examination of the ancient texts, we are going to introduce some new data concerning archaeobotanical evidence, detected by remote sensing in combination with direct surveys (on land and underwater). On the technical side, we are going to present a geomatic application for underwater measurements of ancient trunks related to discoveries in the palaeo-watercourses of the River Po (geomatic measurements, thanks to remote sensing surveys, allows us to have detailed length and diameters of trunks and trees, which are not always visible and detectable while diving) together with some satellite elevation measurement of the river banks and 3D map supported by geocomputation. Thanks to botanical data, we are able to illustrate the local context of the paleoenvironmental/archaeological sites, offering a reconstruction of the landscape and of the use of the wood. Full article
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