Special Issue "Shipwreck Archaeology"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408). This special issue belongs to the section "Underwater Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Deborah Cvikel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies and Department of Maritime Civilizations, University of Haifa, Haifa 3498838, Israel
Interests: Mediterranean; nautical archaeology; ship construction; shipwreck; underwater archaeology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This volume is dedicated to shipwreck archaeology, a discipline evolving over the last 70 years. A shipwreck and its artifacts represent a moment frozen in time, and underwater archaeology can offer a unique opportunity to explore it, contributing new and valuable information, and enriching our understanding of the past.

The construction of an ancient wooden ship combined traditional shipbuilding design, techniques and skills: choosing and felling the trees, the carpentry of the timbers, shaping the hull, fastenings and assembly, leading to the launch and fitting out of the seaworthy ship.

The underwater excavation of a shipwreck is an expensive and demanding task, influenced by the time available and weather constraints. Its aim, based on its archaeological remains and that of its contents, is to provide not only a detailed description of its construction, but also to describe the original ship, life aboard, the ship’s origin, the route of its last voyage and information on trade.

Original research articles or comprehensive reviews are invited on the following or related topics:

  • Cargoes and special artifacts
  • The human factor: shipwrights, crew, passengers
  • In-situ conservation and preservation of shipwrecks
  • Studies in ancient ship construction
  • Underwater excavation and documentation methods

Dr. Deborah Cvikel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Conservation
  • Maritime heritage
  • Ship construction
  • Underwater archaeology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Master Frame and Flat Floor-Timber: An ‘Architectural Signature’ of the Mediterranean Shipyards?
Heritage 2021, 4(4), 2623-2642; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4040148 - 23 Sep 2021
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Abstract
This article is an attempt to analyse the master frame form characterised by a flat floor-timber, a sharp or shaped turn of the bilge, and more or less straight sides. This form of master frame is associated with the Mediterranean architecture of the [...] Read more.
This article is an attempt to analyse the master frame form characterised by a flat floor-timber, a sharp or shaped turn of the bilge, and more or less straight sides. This form of master frame is associated with the Mediterranean architecture of the ‘frame-based’ principle, as attested from the end of the 5th century to the beginning of the 6th century AD Dor 2001/1 shipwreck (Israel), which is considered as one of the five origins (Root 4: Nilotic-riverine) of the ‘frame-based’ architecture. A series of medieval and modern wrecks of coastal ships and galleys bear witness to this form of master frame linked more generally to the Mediterranean whole moulding. In view of the consistency of these archaeological as well as ethnographic evidence on traditional Mediterranean shipbuilding, this form of master frame with a flat floor-timber appears to be one of the most revealing ‘architectural signatures’ of the practices of Mediterranean shipyards. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shipwreck Archaeology)
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Article
Synthetic 3D Recording of a Shipwreck Embedded in Seafloor Sediments: Distinguishing Internal Details
Heritage 2021, 4(2), 541-553; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4020032 - 24 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1009
Abstract
3D recording of shipwrecks completely buried in seafloor sediments has great potential as an important aspect of maritime archaeological surveys and management. Buried shipwrecks have been recorded directly with seismic 3D Chirp sub-bottom profilers on an experimental basis. This method is, however, expensive, [...] Read more.
3D recording of shipwrecks completely buried in seafloor sediments has great potential as an important aspect of maritime archaeological surveys and management. Buried shipwrecks have been recorded directly with seismic 3D Chirp sub-bottom profilers on an experimental basis. This method is, however, expensive, time-consuming and complicated. This article outlines the application of a faster, cheaper, and less complicated method of synthetic 3D recording, which is also less sensitive to weather conditions. It involves the acquisition of a larger number of seismic 2D high-resolution sub-bottom profiles in a dense grid that does not need to be regular. The method is based on the results of survey work conducted in the Akko Harbour area, on the Carmel coast of Israel, which shows that the shape of the hull of a shipwreck can be precisely determined, and that the sedimentary units bounding it can be outlined and interpreted. Based on an interpretation of the shape of the hull, the depth of the structure was measured, and a 3D image of the shipwreck was subsequently generated. Samples of the sub-seafloor were obtained across the area, and the sample located within the area of the mapped shipwreck was found to contain wood fragments and a piece of rope. This article demonstrates that 2D surveying is a viable and cost-effective alternative to 3D surveying that is able to produce good results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shipwreck Archaeology)
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