Special Issue "Organic Materials in Heritage Science"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Massimo Lazzari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Research in Biological Chemistry and Molecular Materials (CIQUS), University of Santiago de Compostela, c. Jenaro de la Fuente s/n—Campus Vida, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: block copolymers; nanomaterials; functional materials; soft lithography; material science for cultural heritage
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic materials, in form of natural resins or synthetic polymers, also including cellulosic and proteinaceous materials, are part of a wide variety of artworks, historical and archaeological objects. They may be constituent materials of cultural heritage objects, as in the case of paintings, graffiti, books and paper materials, parchments, leather artefacts, design and wooden objects, or are used for the conservation and preservation of tangible cultural heritage in form of organic (mostly polymeric) consolidants, adhesives and coatings.

In the context of heritage and conservation studies, this special issue focuses on:

  1. general aspects related with the development and critical assessment of organic materials for the conservation of cultural heritage, also including those used for cleaning treatments;
  2. identification, characterization, development of new analytical techniques and methods for diagnostics, prediction of long-term ageing of organic materials in historical, modern and contemporary artwork, and objects of cultural significance.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect contributions highlighting recent achievements in the field of organic materials in/for cultural heritage, in form of original papers and short communications. Reviews, mini-reviews and papers reporting case studies will also be evaluated.

Do not hesitate to contact me before the submission!

Prof. Dr. Massimo Lazzari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural resins
  • Terpenic resins
  • Polysaccharides
  • Oil paints
  • Plastics
  • Acrylic polymers
  • Contemporary artworks
  • Street art
  • Ancient paintings
  • Wooden sculptures
  • Archaeological objects
  • Textiles
  • Paper conservation
  • Stone conservation
  • Heritage cleaning
  • Organogels
  • Adhesives
  • Deterioration
  • Weathering
  • Restoration products
  • Spectroscopic techniques
  • Pyrolysis-gas chromatography

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Multi-Analytical Assessment of Bodied Drying Oil Varnishes and Their Use as Binders in Armour Paints
Heritage 2021, 4(4), 3402-3420; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4040189 - 14 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 476
Abstract
The characteristics of commercially available refined and bodied linseed and tung oils, used as binders in the production of armour paints after historic recipes, are explored. Employed as anticorrosive paints mainly from the 1920s to 1960s, armour paints are greener alternatives that can [...] Read more.
The characteristics of commercially available refined and bodied linseed and tung oils, used as binders in the production of armour paints after historic recipes, are explored. Employed as anticorrosive paints mainly from the 1920s to 1960s, armour paints are greener alternatives that can be used for protection in industrial heritage conservation. Using a multi-analytical approach, chemical and physical properties of the fresh oils and solid films before and after accelerated ageing (ISO 16474-2:2013) were investigated to better understand which features are beneficial for the technical function of armour paints. Tests included measurements of density, the refractive index, insoluble impurities, alkaline impurities, the water content, the iodine value, the saponification value, the free fatty acid concentration, the acid value, the peroxide value and colour (Lovibond) and cold tests. The characterisation of the fresh oils using molecular analysis with FTIR and GC-MS revealed the complexity of the commercial formulations, for which additions of semi- and non-drying oils were detected. The results show that organic paint binders follow complex chemical reactions (such as oxidation and decrease of unsaturation being variable or swelling following water-immersion tests), with implications for their suitability for use in protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Materials in Heritage Science)
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Article
Identification of Coatings on Persian Lacquer Papier Mache Penboxes by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Luminescence Imaging
Heritage 2021, 4(3), 1962-1969; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage4030111 - 24 Aug 2021
Viewed by 454
Abstract
In this study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and luminescence imaging were used to identify the coatings of seven Persian lacquer papier mache penboxes, of which two were contemporary, one was from the Pahlavi era, and four belonged to the Qajar era. First, [...] Read more.
In this study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and luminescence imaging were used to identify the coatings of seven Persian lacquer papier mache penboxes, of which two were contemporary, one was from the Pahlavi era, and four belonged to the Qajar era. First, FTIR was used to identify the nature of the coating. Then, UV-induced visible luminescence imaging at the spectral ranges of 420–680 nm (UVL), 425–495 nm (UVIBL), and 615–645 nm (UVIRL) was performed for further examination. The FTIR results showed that the coatings were made of alkyd resin, oil-resin varnish (Kaman oil), and shellac. In UV-induced visible luminescence images, synthetic alkyd resin showed no fluorescence, which made it distinguishable from the natural organic coatings. While it is slightly challenging to differentiate Kaman oil from shellac based on FTIR results, these two coatings can be easily distinguished by their fluorescence in UVL and UVIBL images. The results suggest that the combined use of spectroscopy and spectral imaging methods can provide substantial information about the organic coatings of historical objects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Materials in Heritage Science)
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