Special Issue "Heritage as a Driver of the Sustainable Development Goals"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Claire Smith
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Humanities, Arts and Social Science, Flinders University, Adelaide 5042, Australia
Interests: cultural heritage; globalization; indigenous communities; gender; sustainable development goals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Lilia Lucia Lizama
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Arqueólogos Sin Fronteras Del Mundo Maya Mexico, Puerto Morelos, Mexico
Interests: cultural heritage; cultural tourism; globalization
Dr. Israel Herrera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Investigaciones Juríricas, Universidad Autónoma de Campeche, Campeche, Mexico
Interests: cultural heritage and the law; globalization; sustainable development
Dr. Alok Kumar Kanungo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Gandhinagar, India
Interests: cultural heritage preservation; indigenous heritage; ethnography; Indian heritage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Across the world, heritage is being placed under increasing stress as globalization accelerates, tourism diversifies, cultural diversity is eroded, the environment changes, and development pressure increase. However, heritage is powerful. The material objects and traces created by past and present people, and the social memory that is woven around them, anchors individual people and their memories to broader, societal understandings of the past. These cultural objects are embedded in environments that have their own histories and trajectories and within the context of a global environmental crisis that disproportionally affects Indigenous communities. In an increasingly fragmented world, heritage can strengthen a sense of community by fortifying its relationship to place. It can boost a regional economy through sustainable tourism. Moreover, heritage is an important resource for fostering cultural resilience, reducing disaster risk, and supporting social cohesion.

Since the 1970s, sustainable development was viewed through an environmental lens, usually in terms of environmental degradation. However, there is a sea change in relation to the way in which cultural heritage is envisaged in this process. In 2013, UNESCO convened the Culture: Key to Sustainable Development international conference in Hangzhou, China. Since then, momentum has built. UNESCO (2015) outlines the challenge in Introducing Cultural Heritage into the Sustainable Development Agenda:

The cultural heritage has been absent from the sustainable development debate despite its crucial importance to societies and the wide acknowledgment of its importance at national level ... Globalization, urbanization and climate change can threaten the cultural heritage and weaken cultural diversity. What measures are needed to promote the safeguarding of the cultural heritage in the global development agenda? What are the concrete actions that need to be taken in order to integrate cultural heritage conservation and promotion into the sustainable development debate? (UNESCO 2015).

A watershed occurred when the Sustainable Development Goals came into effect in January 2016. The 17 goals that were identified are supported by 169 targets. While cultural heritage was not identified as a specific goal, it can be used to further all 17 goals.

Prof. Dr. Claire Smith
Dr. Lilia Lucia Lizama
Dr. Israel Herrera
Dr. Alok Kumar Kanungo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Alutiiq Fish Skin Traditions: Connecting Communities in the COVID-19 Era
Heritage 2021, 4(4), 4249-4263; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4040234 - 06 Nov 2021
Viewed by 224
Abstract
The Alutiiq, Indigenous inhabitants of the coastal regions of Southwest Alaska, created garments made from fish skins, especially salmon, expertly sewn by women from Kodiak Island. Traditionally, Alutiiq education focused on acquiring survival skills: how to navigate the seas in all weathers, hunting, [...] Read more.
The Alutiiq, Indigenous inhabitants of the coastal regions of Southwest Alaska, created garments made from fish skins, especially salmon, expertly sewn by women from Kodiak Island. Traditionally, Alutiiq education focused on acquiring survival skills: how to navigate the seas in all weathers, hunting, fishing and tanning animal skins. Today, many Alutiiq people continue to provide for their families through subsistence fishing, honouring the ocean and navigating difficult times by listening to their collective wisdom. This paper describes the series of fish skin tanning workshops taught by June Pardue, an Alutiiq and Inupiaq artist from Kodiak Island that connected participants in Alaska Native communities during the COVID-19 isolation months. Through an online platform, June passed on expert knowledge of the endangered Arctic fish skin craft, assisting participants in coping with the pandemic crisis by tapping into their knowledge of the natural world, cultural resourcefulness, storytelling abilities and creative skills. Brought into the digital age, the fish skin workshops strengthened connections among Alutiiq and Alaskan craftspeople while establishing new connections with an expanded network of fashion designers, museum curators, conservators and tanners. Finally, the paper highlights how fish skin Indigenous practices address the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) regarding poverty, health and well-being, gender equality, clean water and sanitation, decent work and economic growth, social inequality, responsible consumption and production, climate change and maritime issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage as a Driver of the Sustainable Development Goals)
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Article
Analysis and Identification of Sustainable Public Policy for Management of Cultural and Natural Heritage in the Maya Region in Line with the Sustainable Development Goals
Heritage 2021, 4(4), 4172-4183; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4040229 - 02 Nov 2021
Viewed by 324
Abstract
The present study identifies suitable sustainable public policy for the administration of archaeological zones in Mexico, particularly in the states of Yucatán, Campeche and Quintana Roo (Maya region). Given the rapid economic growth of the Southeastern region of Mexico, it is necessary to [...] Read more.
The present study identifies suitable sustainable public policy for the administration of archaeological zones in Mexico, particularly in the states of Yucatán, Campeche and Quintana Roo (Maya region). Given the rapid economic growth of the Southeastern region of Mexico, it is necessary to implement a comprehensive and sustainable form of administration for the cultural and archaeological heritage. Key components of the ideal policy are aligned to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Data is based on researchers’ own experiences on how these SDGs can act as a base for the much needed change in the management of Mexico´s archaeological zones. We are looking at a policy that has clear goals, objectives, concrete strategies and actions including: (1) Comprehensive plan, (2) Regional plan, (3) Land use plan—master plan, (4) Cultural tourism plan which covers ecotourism and nature based tourism, art centers, museums and monuments. The resource management plan should cover aspects like: (1) disaster planning, (2) operations and marketing, (3) interpretation, (4) budgetary issues and (5) financing. Success in the implementation of such a policy requires the strengthening of regional and local federalism, transparency, accountability, corporate governance and planning for sustainable cultural tourism development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage as a Driver of the Sustainable Development Goals)
Article
Yagan Heritage in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina): The Politics of Balance
Heritage 2021, 4(4), 3790-3805; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4040208 - 21 Oct 2021
Viewed by 440
Abstract
This paper analyses the tangible and intangible Yagan heritage contents exhibited by the Museo del Fin del Mundo (MFM, Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) and presented during its guided tour led by Yagan Community Counsellor Victor Vargas Filgueira. We show how the critical [...] Read more.
This paper analyses the tangible and intangible Yagan heritage contents exhibited by the Museo del Fin del Mundo (MFM, Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) and presented during its guided tour led by Yagan Community Counsellor Victor Vargas Filgueira. We show how the critical outlook of Fuegian history offered in the latter challenges the traditional past-only fossilized view of the Yagan, building past–present links and helping to overcome biased hegemonic discourses. We also discuss how employing a member of the Yagan Community at the MFM has been an efficient and low-budget strategy that helps to comply with some Goals of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which are difficult to attain in developing countries. Significant outcomes of this process include: (a) providing a full-time formal job to a member of an Indigenous Community who has been traditionally dispossessed of/in their own territory; (b) acknowledging him as a knowledge holder and valuable member of society; (c) moving the role of Yagan People from subject to agent of the MFM. This process has fostered the dialogue between Yagan voices and academic discourses, challenging traditional Western dichotomies-ecology/economy, natural/cultural heritage, and so forth, and contributing to the discussion of key concepts on sustainability and engagement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage as a Driver of the Sustainable Development Goals)
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Article
Globalization, Cultural Heritage Management and the Sustainable Development Goals in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Nigeria
Heritage 2021, 4(3), 1703-1715; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4030094 - 11 Aug 2021
Viewed by 538
Abstract
This paper addresses the impacts of globalization on cultural heritage conservation in sub-Saharan Africa. The homogenization and commodification of Indigenous cultures as a result of globalization and it’s impacts on the devaluation of heritage sites and cultural properties is discussed within a Nigerian [...] Read more.
This paper addresses the impacts of globalization on cultural heritage conservation in sub-Saharan Africa. The homogenization and commodification of Indigenous cultures as a result of globalization and it’s impacts on the devaluation of heritage sites and cultural properties is discussed within a Nigerian context. Additionally, the ongoing global demand for African art objects continues to fuel the looting and destruction of archaeological and historical sites, negatively impacting the well-being of local communities and their relationships to their cultural heritage. Global organizations and institutions such as UNESCO, the World Bank, and other institutions have been important stakeholders in the protection of cultural heritage worldwide. This paper assesses the efficacy of the policies and interventions implemented by these organizations and institutions within Africa and makes suggestions on how to advance the protection of African cultural heritage within the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Furthermore, cultural heritage conservation is explored as a core element of community well-being and a tool with which African nations may achieve sustainable economic development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage as a Driver of the Sustainable Development Goals)
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Article
Ongoing Colonization and Indigenous Environmental Heritage Rights: A Learning Experience with Cree First Nation Communities, Saskatchewan, Canada
Heritage 2021, 4(3), 1388-1399; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4030076 - 20 Jul 2021
Viewed by 639
Abstract
Ongoing colonization of the environment and natural resources has negatively impacted environmental heritage rights in many parts of the world, particularly Indigenous environmental rights and their relationships with the environment. For many Indigenous communities, the history of colonialism became a history of dispossession [...] Read more.
Ongoing colonization of the environment and natural resources has negatively impacted environmental heritage rights in many parts of the world, particularly Indigenous environmental rights and their relationships with the environment. For many Indigenous communities, the history of colonialism became a history of dispossession for Indigenous peoples, their land, water, traditional knowledge, and practices. This paper addresses the ongoing environmental heritage conflict between the Cree First Nation communities’ traditional environmental heritage practices and developmental energy projects in Saskatchewan, Canada. Drawing from a relational research framework, we (Cree First Nation Knowledge Keeper and settler scholar of color) shared our learning reflections from Cree First Nation communities on how energy projects (particularly pipeline leaks) have negatively impacted Indigenous land, water, and traditional heritage and practices. In this paper, we focus our learnings from the Cree First Nation communities on the following questions: Why and how do developmental projects neglect Indigenous heritage rights, particularly environmental heritage rights? What can be or should be done about it? What are our responsibilities as researchers and educators? In this study, we learned about traditional-knowledge-based consultation and solutions to the ongoing challenges of incorporating Indigenous interests into environmental heritage to foster Indigenous environmental heritage rights. We also highlight how Indigenous perspectives on their environmental heritage rights are interconnected with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) from our learning reflections, particularly Goal 3, Good Health and Wellbeing, Goal 10, Reduced Inequalities, Goal 13, Climate Action, Goal 15, Life on Land, and Goal 16, Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage as a Driver of the Sustainable Development Goals)
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