Special Issue "Understanding and Representation of the Intangible and Tangible Dimensions of Traditional Crafts for Their Safeguarding and Valorization"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408). This special issue belongs to the section "Cultural Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nikolaos Partarakis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Computer Science, Vassilika Vouton, GR-700 13 Heraklion, Crete, Greece
Interests: X-reality applications; intelligent environments; adaptive and intelligent distributed user interfaces for interaction in intelligent environments; design for all and universal access; universally accessible platforms and online communities; serious games; 3D reconstruction technologies; automation; micro-controllers and robotics
Dr. Xenophon Zabulis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Computer Science, Heraklion, Crete, Greece
Interests: stereo and multiple-view computer vision; pose estimation and motion estimation for objects and persons; medical and industrial image analysis; applications of computer vision in interactive environments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Lucia Pannese
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Imaginary srl, Milan, Italy
Interests: digital interactive technologies
Dr. Anne-Laure Carré
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Musée des Arts, Paris, France
Interests: glass technology history
Dr. Carlo Meghini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell’Informazione “A.Faedo”, Via G. Moruzzi 1, Località S. Cataldo, I-56124 Pisa, IT, Italy
Interests: information systems
Dr. Sotiris Manitsaris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
MINES ParisTech, PSL Université Paris, Paris, France
Interests: machine/deep learning; action and gesture recognition; data analysis and modeling; human-centred AI
Prof. Dr. Arnaud Dubois
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Paris and Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Art, Limoges, France
Interests: anthropology of color; relations between aesthetic technology and society; link between art craft and industry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Traditional Crafts (TCs) are part of Cultural Heritage (CH) and involve tangible craft artefacts and products, traditional materials and tools, while encompass craftsmanship as a form of Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH)1. Intangible TC dimensions include knowledge about materials, dexterity, know-how, and skilled use of tools, as well as, tradition, structure, and a common sense of identity of the communities in which they are, or were, practiced. HCs are part of the history and economic life of the areas and communities in which they flourished. Their nature, diversity, excellence and significance vary over time and they are part of the CH and history of local societies, nations, and continents. HCs are objects of cultural exchange or may be secret and can be decisive to the economic or military dominance of a nation.

The technical, historical, and social knowledge about a TC, its temporal evolution over time, and the way that it is taught are parts of humanity’s Cultural Heritage. The significance and urgency to the preservation of TCs is underscored by UNESCO2, as several are threatened with extinction, due to the declining numbers of practitioners and apprentices”, in combination with demotivation, lack of interest in younger generations and urbanization.

This special issue will focus on the means to establish representations of TCs based on digital assets and semantic annotations, in a way that captures and preserves both tangible and intangible CH dimensions.  Meaningful and documented experiential presentations of TC are envisioned to be provided through narratives. These presentations may address a range of uses including, personalized storytelling, interactive Augmented Reality (AR) and Mixed Reality (MR), and through the Internet. Engaging cultural experiences are expected to have a direct impact in interest growth and tourism, which can support HC communities and institutions. Furthermore, the attraction of new apprentices to guarantee long-term TC preservation and the combination old crafts techniques with cutting-edge new technologies have the potential on valorisation.  

More specifically this special issue welcomes contributions focused on one or more from the following domains and disciplines:

  • Protocols, methods and approaches for the Representation and presentation of TCs
  • Advanced digitization technologies for TCs
  • Semantic representation of Tradition Crafts including the socio historic context of their evolution
  • Technologies and applications of Semantic Narratives in TCs
  • Technologies for understanding human motion in HCs
  • Methods and tools for understanding the techniques of TCs
  • Combination of TCs techniques with new and emerging cutting-edge technologies.
  • Applications of radical new approaches for vocational training on HCs powered by X-Reality
  • Thematic tourism powered by rich TC experiences
  • Innovation, growth and sustainability
  • New social platforms to connect TCs stakeholders with the objective of business innovation and sustainability.
  • Games and gamification technologies to enhance the presentation of TC processes and techniques
  • User Engagement and Motivation
  • Authoring environments to support novel TC visualizations
  • 3D virtual humans for TC presentation and training
  • Immersive visualization of the socio-historic content of Traditional Crafts
  • Reproduction of traditional artefacts, techniques and know-how and combination with new technologies

1 UNESCO, Intangible Cultural Heritage Domains, 2003.

2 UNESCO, Text of the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, 2003.

Dr. Nikolaos Partarakis
Dr. Xenophon Zabulis
Dr. Lucia Pannese
Dr. Anne-Laure Carré
Dr. Carlo Meghini
Dr. Sotiris Manitsaris
Prof. Dr. Arnaud Dubois
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Supporting Online and On-Site Digital Diverse Travels
Heritage 2021, 4(4), 4558-4577; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4040251 - 02 Dec 2021
Viewed by 202
Abstract
Cultural-heritage research has created a vast amount of information regarding heritage objects and sites. At the same time, recent efforts on the digitization of cultural heritage have provided novel means of documenting tangible cultural resources including digital images, videos, audio testimonies, and 3D [...] Read more.
Cultural-heritage research has created a vast amount of information regarding heritage objects and sites. At the same time, recent efforts on the digitization of cultural heritage have provided novel means of documenting tangible cultural resources including digital images, videos, audio testimonies, and 3D reconstructions. Furthermore, ethnographic research is nowadays combined with advanced capturing technologies such as motion capture to record the intangible dimensions of heritage as these are manifested through human expression in dance, heritage crafts, etc. This amount of information is now available and should be used to create novel forms of experiential access to cultural heritage powered by the web and mobile technologies mixed with novel interaction paradigms such as virtual and augmented reality. In this article, a platform is presented that facilitates a cloud-based web application to support location-based narratives on cultural-heritage resources provided through map-based or story-based representation approaches. At the same time, the platform through the power of modern mobile devices can provide these experiences on the move using location-based and image recognition-based augmented reality to facilitate multiple usage contexts. The platform was implemented to support the goal of the project CuRe, in the context of the “Greece-Germany” bilateral collaboration action. Full article
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Article
Realistic Virtual Humans for Cultural Heritage Applications
Heritage 2021, 4(4), 4148-4171; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/heritage4040228 - 01 Nov 2021
Viewed by 374
Abstract
Virtual Humans are becoming a commodity in computing technology and lately have been utilized in the context of interactive presentations in Virtual Cultural Heritage environments and exhibitions. To this end, this research work underlines the importance of aligning and fine-tuning Virtual Humans’ appearance [...] Read more.
Virtual Humans are becoming a commodity in computing technology and lately have been utilized in the context of interactive presentations in Virtual Cultural Heritage environments and exhibitions. To this end, this research work underlines the importance of aligning and fine-tuning Virtual Humans’ appearance to their roles and highlights the importance of affective components. Building realistic Virtual Humans was traditionally a great challenge requiring a professional motion capturing studio and heavy resources in 3D animation and design. In this paper, a workflow for their implementation is presented, based on current technological trends in wearable mocap systems and advancements in software technology for their implementation, animation, and visualization. The workflow starts from motion recording and segmentation to avatar implementation, retargeting, animation, lip synchronization, face morphing, and integration to a virtual or physical environment. The testing of the workflow occurs in a use case for the Mastic Museum of Chios and the implementation is validated both in a 3D virtual environment accessed through Virtual Reality and on-site at the museum through an Augmented Reality application. The findings, support the initial hypothesis through a formative evaluation, and lessons learned are transformed into a set of guidelines to support the replication of this work. Full article
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