Special Issue "2nd Edition: Wearable Technology and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jennifer L. Scheid
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health Promotion and Physical Therapy, Daemen College, Amherst, NY 14226, USA
Interests: female athlete triad; metabolsim; exercise; fitness; food intake; measuring physical activity; wearable technology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical activity level, sedentary behavior, and sleep are risk factors that impact health and wellness. Wearable fitness technology has been a top three fitness trend since 2016 (ACSM, 2021). Wearable technology typically includes devices worn on the wrist, chest, arm, hip, or any other part of the body that can measure physical activity, sedentary behavior, and/or sleep. Fitness watches (e.g., those made by Apple, Fitbit, Garmin, Misfit, and Polar) have become particularly popular and can measure physical activity and sleep. At a basic level, most fitness watches and activity monitors are a type of pedometer or accelerometer. Pedometers measure the steps taken, while accelerometers measure movement in multiple directions. Upgraded fitness watches and activity monitors also determine the heart rate and employ the Global Positioning System (GPS). This information can be integrated with the accelerometer data to obtain a detailed knowledge of daily physical activity and sedentary behavior.  In addition, these fitness watches and activity monitors can be integrated with diet apps to promote healthy eating. 

For this New Special Issue “2nd Edition: Wearable Technology and Health” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, we invite submissions that examine the impact of using wearable technology on physical activity or other aspects of health (physiological or psychosocial). We also welcome submissions that validate the use of wearable technology to measure variables related to physical activity or other health outcomes. High-quality narrative and systematic reviews will also be considered. All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field and are due by July 31, 2022.

Dr. Jennifer L. Scheid
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wearable technology
  • fitness watch
  • exercise
  • physical activity
  • sleep

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Exploring the Use of Fitbit Consumer Activity Trackers to Support Active Lifestyles in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Methods Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11598; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182111598 - 04 Nov 2021
Viewed by 449
Abstract
Background: People with type 2 diabetes are less active than those without the condition. Physical activity promotion within diabetes health care is limited. This project explored the use of Fitbit activity trackers (Fitbit, San Francisco, CA, USA) to support active lifestyles in adults [...] Read more.
Background: People with type 2 diabetes are less active than those without the condition. Physical activity promotion within diabetes health care is limited. This project explored the use of Fitbit activity trackers (Fitbit, San Francisco, CA, USA) to support active lifestyles in adults with type 2 diabetes through a mixed-methods study. Methods: Two stages were conducted. In stage 1, adults with type 2 diabetes used a Fitbit Charge 4 (Fitbit, San Francisco, CA, USA) for 4 weeks. Fitbit and self-reported physical activity data was examined through quantitative analysis. Qualitative analysis was conducted to explore the experiences of participants. In stage 2, health professionals were interviewed to examine their views on using Fitbit activity trackers within type 2 diabetes care. Results: Adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited for stage 1 and adult health care and fitness professionals were recruited for stage 2. Stage 1 participants’ self-reported increases in physical activity (mean weekly minutes of walking increased from 358.75 to 507.50 min, p = 0.046) and a decrease in sedentary behaviour (mean daily hours of sedentary behaviour decreased from 10.65 to 10.05 h, p = 0.575). Fitbit activity data ranges identified individuals who led inactive and sedentary lifestyles below levels recommended and in need of physical activity support to reduce the risk to their health. During interviews, participants stated that the Fitbit activity tracker motivated them to be more active. Stage 2 participants intimated that Fitbit activity trackers could improve the promotion of physical activity within type 2 diabetes care. Interventions involving the Fitbit premium service, community prescription and combined use of Fitbits with physical activity behaviour change models were recommended by stage 2 participants. Conclusions: This study found that there is future scope for using Fitbit activity trackers to support active lifestyles in adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition: Wearable Technology and Health)
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