Special Issue "2nd Edition of Sport Modalities, Performance and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. José Alberto Frade Martins Parraca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Comprehensive Health Research Center (CHRC), Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia – Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Universidade de Évora, 7000-727 Évora, Portugal
Interests: exercise intervention; exercise physiology; exercise science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Bernardino Javier Sánchez-Alcaraz Martínez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Murcia, 30720 San Javier, Spain
Interests: performance analysis; health; physical education; racket sports; training methodology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Diego Muñoz Marín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sport modalities are highly practiced in order to improve many aspects of the human being, including performance and health. The increasing interest in quantitative and qualitative aspects of sport training is ascribable to the fact that several training systems and new methodologies are appearing in all sport modalities. These methodologies can have different effects on the organism depending on the degree of training.

Some of the main objectives in sport research are to describe match activity and to detect effective performance indicators. A better knowledge of players’ performance adaptations and game dynamics during competition is extremely useful for optimizing the training process. The need to develop training methodologies according to actions occurring during the game is essential for each sport.

Since a systematic and well-conducted sport practice is essential for performance and human health, in this Special Issue, the submission of papers focused on performance analysis in sport modalities and the effect of continuous and systematic training on the organism is encouraged.

Dr. José Alberto Frade Martins Parraca
Dr. Bernardino Javier Sánchez-Alcaraz Martínez
Dr. Diego Muñoz Marín
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • exercise
  • training
  • sports performance
  • behavior analysis
  • tactical
  • physiological adaptations
  • biochemical parameters
  • urinary excretion
  • trace elements

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Level of Physical Activity and Its Relationship to Self-Perceived Physical Fitness in Peruvian Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1182; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph19031182 - 21 Jan 2022
Viewed by 174
Abstract
Background: Physical activity and physical fitness play an important role in adolescence. Both are considered to be indicators of the current and future health status of young adults. The main objective of this article was to report the normative values of the Physical [...] Read more.
Background: Physical activity and physical fitness play an important role in adolescence. Both are considered to be indicators of the current and future health status of young adults. The main objective of this article was to report the normative values of the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A) and the International Fitness Scale (IFIS) instruments in Peruvian school adolescents. Methods: A sample of 1229 participants (622 girls and 607 boys) aged between 12 and 17 years was used. The type of study was descriptive-comparative. All measures used were obtained by means of self-administered instruments. The PAQ-A was used to assess the level of physical activity and the IFIS to assess the self-perceived physical fitness level of the adolescents. Results: It was observed that the PAQ-A questionnaire results obtained from the total sample was 2.34; significantly higher for boys (2.41) compared with girls (2.27). For the IFIS, the total score was 3.07, with boys obtaining 3.13 and girls 2.97. Conclusions: It was concluded that there was a direct relationship between the level of PA and self-perceived PF in Peruvian adolescents. Furthermore, adolescent boys were more physically active than girls and they had a better self-perceived PF with the exception of flexibility. Finally, there was a higher weight category involved at the lower level of PA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Sport Modalities, Performance and Health)
Article
Ecological and Construct Validity of a New Technical Level Cuban Dance Field Test
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(24), 13287; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182413287 - 16 Dec 2021
Viewed by 473
Abstract
The study aimed to explore the sensitivity and specificity of a new methodological approach related to the musical rhythm for discriminating a competitive Cuban dancer’s (CDCs) level. Thirty CDCs (Age 23.87 ± 1.76 years, body mass 60.33 ± 9.45 kg, stature 1.68 ± [...] Read more.
The study aimed to explore the sensitivity and specificity of a new methodological approach related to the musical rhythm for discriminating a competitive Cuban dancer’s (CDCs) level. Thirty CDCs (Age 23.87 ± 1.76 years, body mass 60.33 ± 9.45 kg, stature 1.68 ± 0.07 m) were divided into three groups: beginner (BEG, n = 10), intermediate (INT, n = 10), and advanced (ADV, n = 10) according to their training experience/level. Each dancer was assessed while dancing at three different musical rhythms: fast (118 BPM), medium (96 BPM), and slow (82 BPM). The assessed variables were average heart rate (HRM), peak (HRP), and dancing time (DCT). The ADV group succeeded at all three musical combinations (317, 302, 309 s for 82, 96, 118 BPM). The INT group correctly performed only the first two combinations (304, 304 s for 82, 96 BPM), while a significant time difference was shown at the fast musical rhythm (198 ± 6.64 s) compared to the medium (p < 0.001) and slow rhythms (p < 0.001) respectively. As the speed of the musical rhythms increased, the BEG group was not able to follow the rhythm: their results were 300 ± 1.25 s for the slow musical rhythm, 94.90 ± 12.80 s for the medium musical rhythm and 34.10 ± 5.17 s for the fast musical rhythm (p < 0.001). The HRM and HRP grew along with the increase in musical rhythm for all groups (p < 0.001). The ROC analysis showed a high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating the groups for each rhythm’s condition. The BEG and INT groups showed an AUC = 0.864 (95% CI = 0.864–0.954); INT and ADV showed an AUC = 0.864 (95% CI = 0.864–0.952); BEG and ADV showed an AUC = 0.998 (95% CI = 0.993–1.000). The results of this study provided evidence to support the construct and ecological validity of the time of the musical rhythms related to competitive CDCs. Furthermore, the differences in the performances according to various musical rhythms, fast (118 BPM), medium (96 BPM), and slow (82 BPM), succeeded in discriminating a dancer’s level. Coaches and strength and conditioning professionals should include the Cuban Dance Field Test (CDFT) in their test battery when dealing with talent detection, selection, and development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Sport Modalities, Performance and Health)
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Article
Influence of the Pedagogical Model and Experience on the Internal and External Task Load in School Basketball
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 11854; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph182211854 - 12 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 469
Abstract
The methodology used by the teacher in Physical Education sessions conditions the physical fitness of the students, since the design of the tasks determines the physical and physiological demands to which they are exposed. This study aimed to quantify and compare, according to [...] Read more.
The methodology used by the teacher in Physical Education sessions conditions the physical fitness of the students, since the design of the tasks determines the physical and physiological demands to which they are exposed. This study aimed to quantify and compare, according to the teaching methodology and students’ previous experience, the external (eTL) and internal (iTL) load resulting from the application of three intervention programmes that follow different teaching methodologies to teach school basketball: the Tactical Games Approach (TGA), Direct Instruction (DI) and Service Teacher’s Basketball Unit (STBU). The Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPEs) recorded in the assessments (pre-test/post-test) were also studied. A total of 49 students, aged 11 to 12 and divided into three class groups, from the sixth grade of primary education at a state school in Spain, participated in the study. Teaching–learning programs were randomly assigned to student groups. All the sessions were monitored with inertial devices that made it possible to record physical activity and convert the information into kinematic parameters. The results indicated that during the sessions, the students who followed the TGA method recorded higher values of eTL (player load; DI = 4.92, TGA = 6.95, STBU = 2.99) and iTL (mean heart rate; DI = 142.94, TGA = 157.12, STBU = 143.98). In addition, during the evaluation tests, they presented heart rate levels similar to those obtained by the students in the other programmes. However, they spent more time doing high-intensity activity, working longer in the running (DI = 3.42, TGA = 11.26, STBU = 8.32) and sprinting speed ranges (DI = 0.00, TGA = 0.12, STBU = 0.11), and presenting better physical fitness. During the assessments, students with no prior basketball experience showed higher levels of top speed; experienced students had higher levels of heart rate. The TGA method favours the physical condition and health of primary education students, which is why this method is recommended when planning Physical Education sessions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2nd Edition of Sport Modalities, Performance and Health)
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