Special Issue "Advances in Addiction and Alcohol Abuse"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Addiction and alcohol abuse are pervasive diseases with important medical consequences, including in terms of public health. The mortality and morbidity associated with drug use are very high, and their impact on society is enormous, both in terms of quality of life and economic costs. The cause and consequences of addiction and alcohol abuse are multifaceted, complex, and diverse and often transcend many aspects of personal, social, and societal platforms. Therefore, an effective, socially mobilizing, and multiplatform approach is urgently required if the burdens associated with drug use are to be addressed.

This Special Issue aims to provide an overview of the latest research on the cause, consequences and treatment, control/policies of addiction and alcohol abuse, and the economic, legislative, health, and medical impact of addiction and alcohol abuse.

Dr. Joris C Verster
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • alcohol abuse
  • addiction
  • drug abuse
  • drug addiction
  • hangover and next-day effects
  • COVID-19, alcohol, and drug use
  • drug legislation impact (health, economics)
  • psychosocial impact of drug abuse
  • effects of drugs on cognitive functioning, driving and traffic safety
  • drug use and health outcomes
  • economic impact of drug abuse

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Risk-Taking Behavior and the Consumption of Alcohol Mixed with Energy Drink among Australian, Dutch and UK Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5315; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105315 - 17 May 2021
Viewed by 506
Abstract
The relationship between risk-taking behavior, alcohol consumption and negative alcohol-related consequences is well known. The current analyses were conducted to investigate whether alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) is related to risk-taking behavior and if there is a relationship between the amount of [...] Read more.
The relationship between risk-taking behavior, alcohol consumption and negative alcohol-related consequences is well known. The current analyses were conducted to investigate whether alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) is related to risk-taking behavior and if there is a relationship between the amount of energy drink mixed with alcohol consumed, risk-taking behavior and negative alcohol-related consequences. Data from N = 1276 AMED consuming students from the Netherlands, UK and Australia who completed the same survey were evaluated. The analysis revealed that, compared to AMED occasions, on alcohol only (AO) occasions significantly more alcohol was consumed and significantly more negative alcohol-related consequences were reported. On both AO and AMED occasions, there was a strong and positive relationship between amount of alcohol consumed, level of risk-taking behavior and number of reported negative alcohol-related consequences. In contrast, the level of risk-taking behavior was not clearly related to energy drink consumption. Across risk-taking levels, differences in the amount of energy drink consumed on AMED occasions did not exceed one 250 mL serving of energy drink. When correcting for the amount of alcohol consumed, there were no statistically significant differences in the number of energy drinks consumed on AMED occasions between the risk-taking groups. In conclusion, alcohol consumption is clearly related to risk-taking behavior and experiencing negative alcohol-related consequences. In contrast, energy drink intake was not related to level of risk-taking behavior and only weakly related to the number of experienced negative alcohol-related consequences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Addiction and Alcohol Abuse)
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Article
The Relationship between Pain Sensitivity, Pain Catastrophizing and Hangover Severity
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2047; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042047 - 19 Feb 2021
Viewed by 760
Abstract
Recent research found a significant and positive correlation between hangover severity and pain catastrophizing. The current study aimed to verify these findings. Data from N = 673 subjects with a mean (SD) age of 42.2 (19.1) years old (range: 18 to 87 years [...] Read more.
Recent research found a significant and positive correlation between hangover severity and pain catastrophizing. The current study aimed to verify these findings. Data from N = 673 subjects with a mean (SD) age of 42.2 (19.1) years old (range: 18 to 87 years old) was evaluated. An online survey collected data on alcohol consumption and hangovers related to their heaviest drinking occasion between 15 January and 14 March 2020. When correcting for the amount of alcohol consumed, significant correlations were found between hangover severity and both sensitivity to pain (r = 0.085, p = 0.029) and pain catastrophizing (r = 0.095, p = 0.015). In addition, subjective intoxication correlated significantly with sensitivity to pain (r = 0.080, p = 0.041) and pain catastrophizing (r = 0.099, p = 0.011). Overall, the results were more pronounced in men than women, and the associations with pain catastrophizing were strongest for the subscale assessing rumination. In conclusion, although statistically significant, the observed correlations were of small magnitude. Nevertheless, the observations confirm previous findings that suggest a link between pain perception, alcohol consumption, and hangover severity, which warrants further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Addiction and Alcohol Abuse)
Article
The Relationship between the Family Functioning of Individuals with Drug Addiction and Relapse Tendency: A Moderated Mediation Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 625; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020625 - 13 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1142
Abstract
To explore the relationship between family functioning, psychological capital, life history strategy, and relapse tendency of individuals with drug addiction, 842 individuals with drug addiction completed a questionnaire. The results showed that (1) there was a significant negative correlation between the family functioning [...] Read more.
To explore the relationship between family functioning, psychological capital, life history strategy, and relapse tendency of individuals with drug addiction, 842 individuals with drug addiction completed a questionnaire. The results showed that (1) there was a significant negative correlation between the family functioning of individuals with drug addiction and their relapse tendency; (2) psychological capital played an intermediary role between family functioning and relapse tendency; and (3) life history strategy regulated the mediating effect of psychological capital. The results of this study suggest that family members should collaborate with drug addiction treatment centers and participate in the education and treatment process to help reduce drug relapse tendency. Increasing the psychological capital and self-efficacy of individuals with drug addiction through group psychological counseling and psychological education courses could also reduce drug relapse tendency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Addiction and Alcohol Abuse)
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