Special Issue "Advantages and Applications of Mobile and Wearable Technologies for Health and Care"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dario Salvi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University, Nordenskiöldsgatan 1, 211 19 Malmö, Sweden
Interests: mobile health; digital health; e-Health; biomedical engineering; ambient assisted living (AAL); assistive technologies
Dr. Andreas Triantafyllidis
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Centre for Research and Technology, Information Technologies Institute, 57001 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: mobile health; medical informatics; pervasive computing; artificial intelligence; computerised decision support
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Elena Villalba Mora
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Ageing Lab. Centre for Biomedical Technology & Department of Languages And Computer Systems And Software Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Madrid, Spain
Interests: wearable and ambient monitoring of functions as gait speed; functional tests as chair-to-stand tests; health related signals related to chronic conditions as heart failure; diabetes; frailty; parki; IoT and smart homes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At present, wearable and mobile technologies are widespread in most parts of the world. These technologies continuously collect data about our physiology (e.g., physical activity) and our lives (e.g., social interactions through messaging and calls). These data contain ecologically assessed information about our health and wellbeing that can be harnessed for better healthcare provision or for assisting people with special needs. However, the significance of the collected mobile data as well as the efficacy of interventions conducted through the application of wearable and mobile technologies is still uncertain, which limits their adoption in everyday care practice. Other factors affecting the widespread use of these technologies include usability, long-term acceptance, and trust.

In this Special Issue, we aim to collect examples of applications of mobile and wearable technologies within health and care. These include studies that make use of tele-monitoring/tele-care platforms through mobile phone and portable devices, assistive technologies, artificial intelligence, or smart appliances based on the Internet of Things. By sharing both success stories and limitations, we want to bring evidence about how these technologies can or should not be used in health and care settings.

The addressed topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Pilot studies and clinical trials involving wearable and mobile technologies for healthcare.
  • Studies involving assistive technologies for users with special needs.
  • Methods for harnessing data generated by wearable devices and mobile phones in health and care.
  • Artificial intelligence for mobile health.
  • User aspects, usability, acceptance, and trust.

Dr. Dario Salvi
Dr. Andreas Triantafyllidis
Dr. Elena Villalba Mora
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • m-Health
  • e-Health
  • wearable technology
  • digital health
  • fitness trackers
  • assistive technologies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
The Association of Mobile Health Applications with Self-Management Behaviors among Adults with Chronic Conditions in the United States
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10351; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph181910351 - 30 Sep 2021
Viewed by 623
Abstract
Background: Mobile applications related to health and wellness (mHealth apps) are widely used to self-manage chronic conditions. However, research on whether mHealth apps facilitate self-management behaviors of individuals with chronic conditions is sparse. We aimed to evaluate the association of mHealth apps with [...] Read more.
Background: Mobile applications related to health and wellness (mHealth apps) are widely used to self-manage chronic conditions. However, research on whether mHealth apps facilitate self-management behaviors of individuals with chronic conditions is sparse. We aimed to evaluate the association of mHealth apps with different types of self-management behaviors among patients with chronic diseases in the United States. Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational study. We used data from adult participants (unweighted n = 2340) of the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2018 and 2019. We identified three self-management behaviors: (1) resource utilization using electronic personal health records; (2) treatment discussions with healthcare providers; and (3) making healthcare decisions. We analyzed the association of mHealth apps to self-management behaviors with multivariable logistic and ordinal regressions. Results: Overall, 59.8% of adults (unweighted number = 1327) used mHealth apps. Adults using mHealth apps were more likely to use personal health records (AOR = 3.11, 95% CI 2.26–4.28), contact healthcare providers using technology (AOR = 2.70, 95% CI 1.93–3.78), and make decisions on chronic disease management (AOR = 2.59, 95% CI 1.93–3.49). The mHealth apps were associated with higher levels of self-management involvement (AOR = 3.53, 95% CI 2.63–4.72). Conclusion: Among individuals with chronic conditions, having mHealth apps was associated with positive self-management behaviors. Full article
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